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Top 50 NFL Draft Prospects

The 2021 NFL Draft Class is filled with amazing talent, and we are breaking it all down here by profiling the Top 50 players of the 2021 NFL Draft Class. These are our top 50 picks for the very best college football players that will be entering the NFL this coming year. We are breaking down their college statistics, film, strengths, weaknesses, intangibles, and possible NFL landing spots on this list. We also went ahead and mocked every player to a team based on need, talent, and the general consensus of draft range. A reminder that these picks and analyses are subjective. You can head over to Twitter @lineups, where we will be announcing each player live during the 2021 draft.

trevor lawrence
1
Trevor Lawrence
Pick #1 – Jaguars
Clemson, Junior, #1 QB, #1 OVR
21 yrs | 6’6″ | 220 lbs
Vision
9.5
Accuracy
10
Arm
9.5
Pocket IQ
9
Mechanics
9
Mobility
8.5
GP
40
COMP%
67%
PASS YDS
10,098
TDs
90
INT
17
RTG
164.3

Trevor Lawrence has been one of, if not the most hyped quarterback in the history of the NFL Draft. Ever since his sophomore season in high school, he has had eyes on him and people claiming that he is the next generational talent. The only names that can be said in the same sentence when it comes to QB hype and talent entering the draft are John Elway, Peyton Manning, and Andrew Luck. Two Hall of Fame QBs, and one Hall of Fame talent that had his career cut short in Andrew Luck. After crushing Deshaun Watson’s Georgia State High School records, he followed in his footsteps in attending Clemson University. After just one season as a true freshman, many general managers and owners believed he would be the first overall pick in the draft if it were possible for him to enter, even at just 19 years of age. This was after leading the Clemson Tigers to a 15-0 season and a National Championship. Lawrence continued to dominate in his sophomore and junior seasons. Trevor Larence is a special talent that only comes along once a decade.

Strengths

•  IQ
•  Accuracy
•  Leadership
•  Mobile
•  Mechanics
•  Arm Strength
•  Incredible Frame
•  Quick Decision Making

The strengths are evident all over Trevor Lawrence’s tape. He has the arm strength to fit the ball in tight windows all over the field, and he can zip the ball whenever it is needed. With that arm, he consistently places the ball in perfect spots where only his guy can make a play. Lawrence can throw on the run, rolling out to either side with power, accuracy, and ease. Lawrence can be compared to Aaron Rodgers in this way, but with much more speed. Trevor has demonstrated a mastery but also growth in both pre and post-snap reads, something that really reminds you of Andrew Luck and Peyton Manning, creating favorable matchups and finding those matchups after the snap. All-in-all, Lawrence is a complete talent that literally checks every scouting box imaginable.

Weaknesses

•   Locked on Primary WR
•   Extreme Confidence

When it comes to cons, it is extremely hard to find any. The one thing you may run into is the fact that Lawrence is so good he is overconfident. You can find this apparent in two ways. The first is attempting deep passes with almost no space. The crazy thing is that Lawrence often hits these throws, but in the NFL, he will most likely run into a much harder time beating defensive backs off of pure talent and confidence. The second time overconfidence comes into play is every so often locking into one read. See, Lawrence is so good he only needs the tiniest window to hit the throw, so it was often not an issue to only look at one guy and wait for that window to develop. This will need some improvement at the next level.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 10, COMP%: 69.2, PASS YDS: 3,153, PASS TD: 24, INT: 5, RTG: 169.2
Overall stats – GP: 40, COMP%: 66.6, PASS YDS: 10,098, PASS TD: 90, INT: 17, RTG: 164.3

Trevor Lawrence’s production in college was fantastic. In his final season, Lawrence hit almost a 70% completion percentage, maintained a 5 to 1 TD to interception ratio, and averaged a career-high 9.4 yards per attempt. While Lawrence numbers are not quite Joe Burrow’s from last year, you have to keep in mind that none of Lawrence WR’s weapons are projected to be top picks. Amari Rodgers was the best receiving threat, and he is not expected to be a Day 1 or Day 2 pick. In context, Lawrence was outstanding and had ridiculously efficient numbers.

Best Landing Spot

Trevor Lawrence is the one exception to the rule here, as he is not going anywhere but Jacksonville. Urban Meyer, the new Head Coach of the Jaguars, was even given a front-row seat to Lawrence’s workout at Clemson. You do not pass on a generational talent, and for better or worse, there is only one place Lawrence is going. DraftKings has Lawrence at -2,000 or roughly a 95% chance of being 1st overall. I would put that number at 99%, and the only way the Jaguars give up this pick is for 4+ first-round picks, another generational talent, and a solid QB.

The Jaguars have a solid core, with tons of draft capital and cap space. Lawrence will be stepping into the NFL with good weapons in James Robinson, DJ Chark, and Laviska Shenault. However, I peg the Jags to add even more talent in free agency or the draft. This is not a bad landing spot, and Lawrence will make it work, regardless.

Worst Landing Spot

Not Addressed

Draft Range

Pick 1

NFL Comparison

It is very hard to compare Trevor Lawrence to an NFL quarterback. Only three guys even come to mind when it comes to this big of an NFL prospect in Manning, Luck, and Elway. However, his game is nothing like any of theirs. His style and play will remind you a bit of Deshaun Watson and Rookie of The Year Justin Herbert. The thing is, Lawrence is more mobile than Herbert and has a much stronger arm than Watson. It is almost like taking the best of each of these incredibly talented QBs, and then sprinkling on more talent, a bigger frame, and topping it off with one of the best football IQs many have ever seen.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 9.5 – Extremely quick decision-maker that can find open WRs, or throw them open
Accuracy: 10 – Incredible accuracy, especially short to intermediate-range, with precise
Arm Strength: 9.5 – One of the strongest arms to come out of college, but can control the speed at which he throws
Pocket Presence: 9 – Very aware in the pocket, knows how to move around, and keeps his eyes up
Mechanics: 9 – Mechanics are incredible; his long frame may be an issue in the NFL if he does not keep it tight
Mobility: 8.5 – Insanely mobile for his size, he is no Lamar Jackson, but he will pick up plenty of yards on the ground


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Zach Wilson
2
Zach Wilson
Pick #2 – Jets
BYU, Junior, #2 QB, OVR #2
21 yrs | 6’3″ | 210 lbs
Vision
7.5
Accuracy
8.5
Arm
8.5
Pocket IQ
9
Mechanics
7.5
Mobility
9
GP
30
COMP%
67%
PASS YDS
7,652
TDs
56
INT
15
RTG
162.6

Zach Wilson is a QB whose draft stock exploded during the 2020 season. While many prospects chose to sit out or did not do much in the way of changing the perception of their abilities, Wilson took full advantage of the year. Many had Zach Wilson as a draftable QB who was intriguing coming into 2020, but leaving it, he is now in the conversation for the 2nd best prospect, alongside Justin Fields and Trey Lance, for the QB position. Wilson did not take on the toughest competition at BYU during 2020, but he did showcase time and time again a knack for both ball placement and arm strength that was incredible, irrelevant to his competition.

Strengths

• Mobile
• Powerful Arm
• Leadership
• Pocket Presence
• Ball Placement

Zach Wilson’s strengths are very apparent when watching his 2020 tape. Wilson consistently made unbelievable plays with his arm that were NFL quality. He showed off incredible arm strength with multiple 30+ yard passes that looked effortless. His ball placement was also something that looked drastically improved from 2019 to 2020. Wilson was able to do things such as lead his receiver or protect them by throwing away from contact. The best part of Wilson’s tape may be his mobility. He was able to scramble away from pressure on so many occasions I lost count. The best part is that Wilson does not instantly take off with his legs; he keeps his eyes up and makes plays with his arm out of the pocket on a consistent basis.

Weaknesses

• Did not face elite competition
• Errors throwing when under pocket pressure
• Post-snap IQ could be better

When it comes to negatives, there was not a ton in 2020. If you go back to 2019, you could point to some accuracy problems, some bad reads, and some odd pocket awareness. However, this was all improved in 2020. Wilson still struggles with a hand in his face, but he was better at avoiding that in 2020. Now, some may chalk this up to the fact that he did not play great competition in 2020, but that is hardly a knock. One thing I do want to see improvement from with Wilson is his post-snap reads. Faster progressions and faster reads would be something that can lead Wilson to become an elite QB, not just a good one.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 12, COMP%: 73.5, PASS YDS: 3,692, PASS TD: 33, INT: 3, RTG: 196.4
Overall stats – GP: 30, COMP%: 67.6, PASS YDS: 7,652, PASS TD: 56, INT: 15, RTG: 162.9

Zach Wilson’s college production was not very impressive until 2020. However, in 2020 he had the very best year, statically speaking, out of any QB in the nation. He sported an 11:1 TD to INT ratio while completing over 73% of his passes. On top of this, his yards per attempt was a staggering 11.0, and his yards per completion was 12.6. Zach Wilson has a phenomenal season, one of the best that I have ever seen.

Best Landing Spot

I believe that the best case for Zach Wilson would be the Carolina Panthers trading up for him. The Panthers’ offensive system under Matt Rhule would be perfect for the mobile skill set that Zach Wilson offers. He could easily run the system and utilize the incredible deep threats at his disposal in Robby Anderson and DJ Moore. While I do believe that Carolina needs to improve the offensive line, this is something Zach Wilson can make up for as that line is built up. I could see Zach Wilson easily claiming OROY on this Carolina Panthers team and leading them to a playoff berth.

Worst Landing Spot

The Houston Texans are undoubtedly the worst destination for just about any player in the NFL right now; however, there is a real possibility that the Texans trade Watson to the Jets or Dolphins and use that pick on Zach Wilson. If Zach Wilson goes to the Texans, not only is he going to be limited with only Brandin Cooks as his only real weapon, but he is going to be behind a horrible offensive line. On top of both these points, the Texans’ organization is in shambles, the management is inept, and I would not blame Wilson if he refused to sign. That is how bad of shape this team is in.

Draft Range

Pick 1-4

NFL Comparison

I believe that Zach Wilson can be the next Russell Wilson. I mean that as in both are extremely mobile QBs who can hold onto the ball longer due to their legs. Both of them love to air it out deep, and both can pass with extreme accuracy. I think that Zach Wilson is a winner and a leader like we see out of Russell Wilson. When I watch the college tape, I really do see a younger version of Russell Wilson in most things that Zach Wilson is able to accomplish. It can be argued that Russell Wilson is the ceiling for Zach Wilson, but I think that talent is already somewhat comparable, and their play styles are shockingly similar.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 7.5 – This is a place where he can work on getting better at the next level, progressing through reads quicker
Accuracy: 8.5 – Clearly has a mastery over his ball placement and can hit guys all over the field
Arm Strength: 8.5 – Not the biggest cannon, but he is strong and can hit deep throws with ease
Pocket Presence: 9 – Very good at escaping pressure and avoiding the rush
Mechanics: 7.5 – Minor tweaks could be made to his lower body mechanics
Mobility: 9 – Very mobile outside the pocket and could be a big threat to run with the football


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

JaMarr Chase
3
Ja’Marr Chase
Pick #3 – Dolphins
LSU, Senior, #1 WR, #4 OVR
20 yrs | 6’0″ | 208 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
9
Agility
9.5
Speed
7
Jumping
8.5
Size
6
GP
24
REC
107
REC YDS
2,093
TD
23
YDS/REC
19.6

Ja’Marr Chase’s journey to the NFL was anything but ordinary. Beginning in Florida and ending with a year away from football in Louisiana, it’s been a long road to reach his dream of playing on Sundays. Nevertheless, on April 29th, the 6’0 tall, 208-pound star wideout, from 87 miles southwest of Baton Rouge, is expected to be the first wide receiver taken in the 2021 NFL Draft. After briefly committing to Kansas, Chase changed his mind and spent his freshman year playing for Florida before returning home to play for LSU his sophomore season. He impressed in his first year with the Gators, putting up 313 receiving yards on 23 catches in seven starts as a true freshman, but his sophomore year is where he really started to shine. Chase teamed up with the eventual number one draft pick, Joe Burrow, and the Tigers and became virtually unstoppable. They put up video-game-like-numbers on their way to a National Championship, and Chase set single-season SEC records for both receiving yards with 1,780 and touchdown receptions with 20. After winning the Biletnikoff Award for the most outstanding receiver and being named First-Team All-American, Chase decided to opt-out of the 2020 season to preserve his draft stock and health. They say sell high. Well, that’s exactly what Ja’Marr did. We’ll find out if the decision paid off come the end of April.

Strengths

• Route-running
• Hands·
• Ball skills
• Blocking
• Body control
• Contested receptions

Weaknesses

• Speed
• Size

It’s difficult to find any weaknesses with Ja’Marr Chase unless you look with a magnifying glass. If you must nitpick, it has been said that he is quick, but he is not exceptionally fast. His high 4.4 or low 4.5 speed won’t burn by cornerbacks in the NFL, but with his body control, expect Chase to be featured heavily in the slant game. Another weakness of his has been attributed to his reliance on contested catches. Beating the defender to a jump ball was the bread and butter for Chase and Burrows in 2019. Just glancing at his game log, you can see he had receptions of 50, 61, and 78 yards in his last five games, including a 56-yard play in the National Championship. These big plays will be tougher to come by in the National Football League, but he can make up for that in his ability after the catch, where he can extend the play and be tough to tackle. It might be a slow start for the wideout from Baton Rouge, but the future is bright, and he will improve every season.

College Production

2019 stats – 13 GP, 77 receptions, 1,163 receiving yards, 15.1 YPR, 10 TD
Overall stats – 36 GP, 159 receptions, 2,742 receiving yards, 17.2 YPR, 26 TD

Ja’Marr Chase embarrassed every defensive back that lined up across from him in 2019. He put together one of the best seasons a wide receiver has ever had in the history of the SEC, en route to winning a National Championship, the Biletnikoff Trophy, and being named a unanimous First-Team All-American. Chase compiled 1,780 yards, which was the most in college football by over 200 yards. He also led the league in touchdown receptions with 20, beating out his teammate and eventual 22nd overall draft pick, Justin Jefferson, who had 18 TD grabs. Chase had an outstanding 24 receptions over 20 yards, and his exceptional body controlled to a 69.5% catch percentage out of 105 targets in 2019. His record-setting season could be partially attributed to the talent of his gunslinger, Joe Burrow, and the mastermind of their offense Joe Brady. However, if he ends up in the right system, don’t be surprised to see another huge jump in production this year, just like from his freshman to sophomore season.

Best Landing Spot

Several teams could benefit from landing what some think is the top wideout in the 2021 NFL draft. Between his sure hands, solid route-running ability, and contested-catch strength, there is a lot to like. But, in sitting out a year, Chase allowed the gap between him and other wide receivers in the draft to narrow some. Names like Jaylen Waddle and DeVonte Smith have muddied the waters at the top of the WR draft board, but I still expect we will see Chase’s name called first. If it comes in the first ten picks, like expected, the best place for Ja’Marr is the Cincinnati Bengals. The Bengals have the fifth overall pick in this year’s draft, and it would be incredible to see it used to reunite Ja’Marr Chase and Joe Burrow. If they were to draft Chase, they would be adding to a strong receiving core made up of Tyler Boyd and Tee Higgins, and he would be filling a void with AJ Green with one foot out the door. Although Cincinnati would probably be better off drafting an offensive lineman to protect Burrow, it would be a lot more fun to see what the two LSU Tigers could do if they teamed up again.

Worst Landing Spot

Although all teams would love to have a prodigy wide receiver like Ja’Marr Chase on their roster, he isn’t a great fit for everyone. Because of cap space and a few other reasons, the worst landing spot for Chase is the Cleveland Browns. The Browns are already paying their two wideouts, Beckham and Landry, over $30 million dollars, which is 14% of their cap space. In the short term, it might help the team, but it would hurt the organization. Not to mention Cleveland has the 26th pick in this year’s draft, so they would have to make some drastic plays to move up into the top ten to have a chance at Chase.

Draft Range

Picks 3-7

NFL Comparison

When you watch the film of the sure-handed, route-running sensation, Ja’Marr Chase is most similar to legend and future Hall of Famer Larry Fitzgerald. Body control is the name of the game for these two wideouts. Fitzgerald is infamous for boxing out a defender in the corner of the endzone and coming down with every ball thrown his way. Ja’Marr Chase does the same thing, using his body to win jump balls and to break tackles across the middle. They are also both very smart on and off the field. Fitz is one of the most football-savvy guys out there and has invested in 40 to 50 companies, including his own travel company. Chase is the same way. On the field, he can find the soft spot in the zone defense and time a jump ball perfectly. He also wisely opted out of the 2020 season, preserving his health and draft stock for a lengthy, successful NFL career.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 7.0 – Chase is more quick than fast, he is not a burner, but he won’t have any trouble getting open in the league.
Agility: 9.5 – is his best attribute. He knows exactly where to position his body to have an advantage on the defender on every ball thrown his way
Routes: 9.0 – He is a fluid route runner and has a great ability to get open
Hands: 9.0 – He is a natural ball catcher and has great hands. His last season in action he had a drop rate of 5.9 percent while averaging 14.3 yards per target.
Jumping: 8.5
Size: 6


By: Russ Thomas @Rusty_Bill

Justin Fields
4
Justin Fields
Pick #4 – Falcons
Ohio State, Senior, #3 QB, #3 OVR
22 yrs | 6’3″ | 228 lbs
Vision
5
Accuracy
8.5
Arm
8
Pocket IQ
7.5
Mechanics
7.5
Mobility
8.5
GP
34
COMP%
68%
PASS YDS
5,701
TDs
67
INT
9
RTG
178.8

Justin Fields was an elite High School prospect who chose to go to Georgia. Fields actually won the Elite 11 MVP, a High School QB competition where he went up against the likes of Trevor Lawrence. However, after one year at Georgia, Justin Fields transferred to Ohio State, where he immediately became the starting QB. It was at Ohio State where Fields would flourish, slowly turning himself into the agreed-upon #2 QB in the draft. That was until 2020 when Zach Wilson blew up onto the scene. The waters were further muddied when Fields took down Trevor Lawrence in the semi-finals of the CFB playoffs. At this point, Fields looks like a great prospect who ranges from being a starting to elite NFL QB, depending on what scout you ask. He ranges between 2-4 when it comes to the QB slot in the class.

Strengths

• Arm talent
• Accuracy
• Very Mobile
• Keeps Head Up
• Bootlegs

Justin Fields’ strengths are very easy to see when flipping on the tape. You do not have to look hard. He has great arm strength that can laser the ball all over the field. He has excellent accuracy and can often lead receivers and pick out his spots when passing. This accuracy does not take a huge hit when he throws on the run as he is an outstanding mobile QB who does a good job of keeping his head up. This means that Fields will not always take off and run, which he can do very well, but instead often extends plays and picks up huge chunks with his arm.

Weaknesses

• Locks onto One Read
• Holds onto the Ball too Long
• Attempts Risky Throws
• Slow on Progressions
• The Deep Ball Could be Better

The cons for Justin Fields mostly revolve around the time he takes to throw the ball. While some use Russell Wilson as a comparison, I do not believe that Fields has the same scramble ability as Wilson. The NFL is going to be much faster, and the schemes more complex than what Ohio State ran. Fields will need to learn to make reads faster, move on from his first read quicker, and get the ball out. If he cannot do this, I do not believe that he can become a great NFL QB. Fields also often attempts some high-risk throws that he will not get away with at the NFL level. Weirdly enough, despite making high-risk throws with pressure, he at times will refuse to throw the ball unless his guy is wide open. He needs to find a better middle ground in this area. My final complaint is a bit nitpicky; however, I would rate his deep ball as average. While he makes a lot of good throws deep, he often misses out on completing the touchdown as he fails to lead the WR or ends up overshooting them. I would rate both of his fellow peers in Zach Wilson and Trevor Lawrence over him when it comes to the deep ball.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 8, COMP%: 70.2, PASS YDS: 2,100, PASS TD: 22, INT: 6, RTG: 175.6
Overall stats – GP: 34, COMP%: 68.4, PASS YDS: 5,701, PASS TD: 67, INT: 9, RTG: 178.8

Justin Fields’ college production was fantastic, especially in 2019. However, in 2020 you need to look no further than the semi-final game against Clemson to see how good Fields can be if he gets the time for his long reads. The throws he can make are fantastic, and it is clear that he has the physical ability to be an elite NFL player. Fields constantly sported a good completion percentage and good TD to INT ratio.

Best Landing Spot

The Atlanta Falcons are a perfect landing spot for Fields for a multitude of reasons. The first is the fact that Fields would get the opportunity to sit behind Matt Ryan and learn. I believe that Fields could benefit greatly, similarly to Patrick Mahomes, if he can sit out for a year or two and learn the game more. During practice, he can be tested and learn how to read NFL defenses, get that ball out quick, and really hone in on all that physical talent. On top of this, Atlanta will be building the team up a bit more over the course of the next year or two as I do not project them to be playoff-bound. This means that Fields may be able to get game time late in the season, and it also means that he can be the face of the newly built Falcons team as they cash in on some good draft stock. All-in-all I think that the Falcons are the very best franchise for Fields’ long-term success.

Worst Landing Spot

The New York Jets would be the worst scenario for Fields. Now, I do not believe that this would ruin Fields’ career. However, ideally, I would have Fields sit a year, and if he goes to the Jets he will be starting year one. On top of this, the Jets do not have many weapons. While I love Denzel Mims, there is nothing very promising beyond that. There are redeeming features about the Jets, the offensive line is trending up, the team has a good amount of cap space and draft capital, and Robert Saleh brought over offensive coaches from the 49ers. The Jets will most likely run a similar system to what the 49ers currently run, a system that I think can suit Fields’ physical abilities. The issue really lies in the fact that, mentally speaking, I do not know if Fields is ready right away. I am worried that he will have a very poor first season, and it will cause him to lose confidence or, even worse, the team to move on right away.

Draft Range

Picks 1-9

NFL Comparison

While many consider this a bit of a hot take, I am going to compare Justin Fields to Kirk Cousins. Now, let me say that Kirk Cousins does not get the credit he is due for how amazing of a passer he is. That is a compliment to Fields. They both are accurate passers who can throw on the run and from play-action. They both can hit the deep ball consistently. Ignoring the obvious mobility difference between the two, the similarities really pick up when it comes to the mental game. Cousins often fails to move on from his first read quick enough, he holds onto the ball too long, and you see minimal pre-snap adjustments from him. I believe that Fields fits all of these categories. One thing that these two also share is waiting for their WR to be wide open instead of throwing them open. Now, Fields could get over these issues, but if he does not, I think that he ends up being a mobile version of Kirk Cousins. Still a good QB, just not an elite Super Bowl-winning QB.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 5 – If Fields’ vision was better, there could be a case for him being near Trevor Lawrence’s level, but it is not. This where he needs to improve.
Accuracy: 8.5 – Extremely accurate; however, he often waits for his WR to be wide open to pass
Arm Strength: 8 – Good arm strength, not quite Josh Allen, or even Herbert/Lawrence level, but it is a strong arm
Pocket Presence: 7.5 – In college, he seemed very aware of the pocket, though I am worried about this at the next level.
Mechanics: 7.5 – He could make some adjustments to quicken his release and stay consistent
Mobility: 8 – Very mobile in and out of the pocket; this is a strong part of his game


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Penei Sewell
5
Penei Sewell
Pick #5 – Bengals
Oregon, Junior, #1 OL, OVR #5
20 yrs | 6’6″ | 325 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
9
Mechanics
8
Pass Blk
6
Run Blk
9
Strength
7

Talented, game-changing skill position players and physical edge rushers are coveted draft day targets for every NFL team. However, finding that once in a decade player to man a spot on the offensive line is equally important. Penei Sewell is one of those special linemen. The good news for teams a few spots down the draft board is the need for, and availability of skill players who team officials ahead of them just cannot pass up. Sewell has continued to fulfill lofty expectations since his high school playing days in Utah. Almost by default, a special player, the clear consensus as the top offensive lineman in the 2021 NFL Draft, may be the target of the team who drafted Joe Burrow first in 2020. With the importance of the left offensive tackle position in the NFL, it will be hard to pass on the lineman who was one of the highest-graded offensive tackles in NCAA history.

Strengths

• Devastating run blocker
• Powerful upper body
• Tremendous balance
• Excellent hand technique
• Extremely quick feet

Weaknesses

• Experience against the versatility of NFL edge rushers and the blitz
• Pass protection footwork
• Occasional lack of focus

Sewell has excellent balance and outstanding coordination. His biggest strength on film is his ability to use this stability from initial contact through the block. This is partly responsible for Sewell’s solid blocking technique. His balance and good use of his hands help prevent him from compensating by getting flagged for holding. Another huge strength of Sewell’s game is the ability to avoid unnecessary penalties from being out-positioned. As one of the highest-rated linemen in recent memory, Sewell’s weaknesses are minimal. One perceived weakness is the lack of experience against highly skilled edge rushers. He will need to improve his pass blocking footwork to avoid getting beat off the edge.

College Production

Sewell came out of Desert Hills High School in Utah as one of the highest rated offensive guards in the country. He passed on offers from such programs as Alabama and Notre Dame to play for the Oregon Ducks. Sewell did not disappoint. Through his production on the field, he has actually improved his rank. Sewell lost over 20 pounds between his freshman and sophomore seasons at Oregon. During the 2019 season, he did not allow a single sack. In nine of his games, Sewell did not allow the Oregon quarterback to be touched. After starting 13 of Oregon’s 14 games in 2019, Sewell elected to sit out the 2020 season and prepare for the NFL Draft.

Best Landing Spot

Cincinnati looks to be the beneficiary of an off-the-charts performance by DeVonta Smith in front of a nationally televised audience. Any team with even the slightest need at wide receiver will earn an F grade if they pass up Smith. The Bengals would come close to earning the same poor marks if they pass up Penei Sewell. Sewell will need some time to develop his pass protection skills, but he is a physical specimen at left tackle and just too talented for Cincinnati not to take with the fifth overall selection.

Worst Landing Spot

Ironically, if the Bengals’ offensive line staff cannot help Sewell master NFL pass blocking skills, it could lead to a rough honeymoon in Cincinnati. Sewell will be entrusted with keeping the NFL’s voracious pass rushers off Joe Burrow’s blindside. He proved worthy of the challenge when he protected former teammate and LA Chargers QB Justin Herbert at Oregon. However, Cincinnati still holds the best potential for this young offensive lineman. Don’t be surprised if his versatility, plus previous experience at the position, allows him to shift down a spot to offensive guard at some point in his career.

Draft Range

Picks 3-5

Prior to the BCS National Championship game, there was a better-than-average chance that the Miami Dolphins would snag Sewell at number three. The Dolphins want to strengthen their offensive line in front of their young quarterback as do the Bengals. However, both teams would benefit tremendously by adding a superstar pass-catcher like Alabama’s DeVonta Smith. With the Falcons at number four, heavily leaning towards someone to replace the aging Matt Ryan at quarterback, this should land the massive offensive tackle in the Bengals’ lap. Sewell will be a gift for the Bengals if they don’t decide to throw it away.

NFL Comparison

Sewell is the same height with a similar body build to a former Cincinnati Bengals offensive tackle. Cincinnati’s scouts would certainly love to add someone in the mold of a player viewed as one of the greatest, if not the best, offensive tackle in NFL history. While there are distinct differences in their physical appearance, Sewell’s devastating run-blocking style has also been compared to the technique of Orlando Pace.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8
Physical: 9 – Might be difficult to fathom, but Sewell was bigger in high school. He has matured into his massive body in a way that has dramatically enhanced his quickness while maintaining the physical size and strength to play offensive line in the NFL.
Mechanics: 8 – Theoutstanding center of gravity that makes Sewell a devastating run blocker will help him master pass protection technique.
Pass Blocking: 6 – Good enough to warrant a top-10 rank on the NFL Draft board. This will be the single most important area Sewell must develop.
Run Blocking: 9 – Powerful leg drive and an uncanny center of gravity. Has the physical capacity to emulate the pancake blocks leveled on defensive backs aka Orlando Pace.
Strength: 7 – Sewell may not rank as the strongest offensive lineman in the class, but he has enough brute strength to overpower defenders.


By: Sam Sherfin @samshefrin

DeVonta Smith
6
DeVonta Smith
Pick #6 – Eagles
Alabama, Senior, #2 WR, #7 OVR
22 yrs | 6’1″ | 175 lbs
Hands
8.5
Routes
9.5
Agility
9
Speed
6
Jumping
8.5
Size
6
GP
47
REC
235
REC YDS
3,965
TD
46
YDS/REC
16.9

DeVonta Smith came out of Amite High School in Louisiana as the #9 ranked WR recruit in 2017. At Alabama, Smith would play a part in one of the greatest WR cores in college history over his 4-year collegiate career as he played alongside Calvin Ridley, Henry Ruggs, Jerry Jeudy, Jaylen Waddle, and Irv Smith. However, after an injury to Waddle was sustained in 2020, he exploded and rocketed up draft boards as he took home the 2020 Heisman as a WR, becoming the first to do so since Desmond Howard in 1991. DeVonta Smith is a unique talent that continued to produce, even as the clear #1 against top-tier competition. He goes into this draft firmly as a top-3 WR talent and has a high chance of being drafted in the top 10 picks.

Strengths

• Route Running
• Leaping Ability
• Finds Soft Spot in Zone
• Hands
• Tons of Production
• Acceleration
• Release

DeVonta Smith has a lot going for him as a wide receiver. First of all, he can accelerate extremely fast as he is explosive in and out of breaks. He is one of the top route runners in college football, arguably the best over the past few seasons besides his teammate Jerry Jeudy. However, unlike Jeudy, Smith has had zero issues with dropped passes and has often made incredible catches in the air, contested or not, despite only being 6’1 175lbs. His release off the ball is one of the best in college and often gives him an advantage in the route that the defensive back cannot recover from. Another thing I personally love about Smith is his ability to find the soft spot in zones and between the safety and corner, something that you can create a successful career off of on its own.

Weaknesses

• Average Top Speed
• Lean frame

The negatives with Smith all revolve around physical worries at the next level. While a decent height at 6’1, he is extremely lean at only 175 pounds. He also does not have elite top speed, with most predicting a low 4.5 forty time. However, guys like Devante Adams and DeAndre Hopkins also ran 4.5 forties and look where they are now. Some are simply worried he is not fast or big enough for the NFL, and while, of course, ideally, he would be bigger and faster, I do not see these as huge negatives.

College Production

2020 stats – 13 GP, 117 receptions, 1,856 receiving yards, 15.9 YPR, 23 TD
Overall stats – 47 GP, 235 receptions, 3,965 receiving yards, 16.9 YPR, 46 TD

What can you say about DeVonta Smith? He won the Heisman, and he maybe had the most dominant WR season in the history of college football. He was literally unguardable, especially in big games. He had 130 yards and 3 touchdowns in the CFB semifinals and 215 yards and 3 touchdowns in the CFB Championship against Ohio State. He was a massive part of this National Title win for Alabama, and I cannot picture a more perfect season for Smith.

Best Landing Spot

The very best case scenario for Smith is that he drops to the Los Angeles Chargers and gets drafted to play alongside Justin Herbert and Keenan Allen. While Allen is a somewhat comparable WR, the amount of talent that would be on the field with Allen in the slot and Mike Williams/DeVonta Smith on the boundaries would be terrifying for opposing defenses. Herbert just put up the best statistical season of all time from a rookie QB. He looked flawless at times, and, to be honest, he was as good as many people expect Trevor Lawrence to be, which is an All-Pro top-5 QB. Smith could go to the Chargers without the stress of having to be the day one #1 WR for the team. I honestly believe that with Herbert supplying the passes, I could envision a Justin Jefferson-like rookie campaign for Smith.

Worst Landing Spot

There are no redeeming qualities about going to the Philadelphia Eagles. Jalen Hurts is the starting quarterback for the team, and he is simply an off-brand version of rookie Carson Wentz, in my opinion. While he can rush the football and has a strong arm, this is one of the worst QB situations that Smith could find himself in. On top of that, there are literally no other weapons on this team receiving-wise. He would be more than just a #1, and he would have to be “the guy” for this offense from day one. While Smith is more than capable of that, he does need some kind of QB, with some kind of offensive line to produce, the curse of being a WR.

Draft Range

Picks 3-14

NFL Comparison

The more and more I watched the tape, the more I realized I was watching Justin Jefferson’s rookie NFL tape mimicked in Smith’s college film. While Jefferson’s college tape is a lot different from Smith’s, when you compare what Jefferson did during his rookie season and how he played the game, it looks exactly the same as DeVonta Smith’s college tape. These two both excel by having a great release, which they then build off of with great routes. Both players have a good vertical and extremely solid hands. Justin Jefferson is faster, but they have about the same explosive acceleration. Even the small things like finding the soft spot in the zone are scarily similar when comparing Jefferson’s NFL tape to Smith’s college tape. These two are very similar WR’s in the way that they achieve success beating DBs.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 6 – Average speed with plus acceleration
Agility: 9 – great at stopping and starting, elusive, and can make plays
Routes: 9.5 – An elite route runner coming out of college
Hands: 8.5 – Smith’s hands are a plus; he’s great at plucking the ball out of the air
Jumping: 8 – Can jump very high, has brought multiple catches in from over 10 ½ feet in the air

Size: 6 – A good height at 6’1 but a very lean frame that many worry about at the next level


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Jaylen Waddle
7
Jaylen Waddle
Pick #7 – Lions
Alabama, Junior, #3 WR, #9 OVR
22 yrs | 5’10” | 182 lbs
Hands
8
Routes
8.5
Agility
9
Speed
9.5
Jumping
7
Size
4.5
GP
34
REC
106
REC YDS
1,999
TD
17
YDS/REC
18.9

For the past five years, Alabama football has been better known as Wide Receiver University. Cooper, Ridley, Jeudy, and Ruggs are all young star wideouts from Alabama playing in the NFL, and Jaylen Waddle is looking to add his name to the list. The 5’10”, 182 lb. wideout from Houston had his choice of colleges after coming out of the tough terrain of high school football in Texas, with offers from 25 different schools. He was the fifth-ranked receiver in the 2018 recruiting class and the second-ranked overall player in the state of Texas. He chose to play for Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide over Texas A&M, Texas, TCU, Oregon, and Florida State. Given Alabama’s deep rotation of wide receivers, that meant he would have to fight for any playing time. Waddle impressed immediately and worked his way up to fifth in the depth chart. As a true freshman, he put up 848 yards on 45 catches and seven touchdowns. He averaged an electric 18.8 yards per play and added a punt return for a touchdown. Playing alongside future first-round draft picks Jerry Jeudy and Henry Ruggs, Waddle saw the field less during his sophomore season. The wideout’s numbers dropped to 33 catches for 560 yards, but the dip didn’t seem to affect his draft stock. NFL scouts were dazzled when Waddle ended the season with a punt return against LSU, where he shook a defender off his facemask and took it 77 yards up the sideline for a touchdown. Unfortunately, his junior and final season at Alabama was cut short due to an ankle injury, but that was not before putting up exceptional numbers to start the year. In Waddle’s first four games, he had 557 yards on 25 catches and four touchdowns. He returned to contribute to the national championship game, testing the ankle injury and helping the Tide win their 18th title. If scouts deem him healthy enough, I don’t see Waddle being available past the 15th pick of the draft.

Strengths

• Speed
• Deep threat ability
• Route-running
• Hands
• Open field agility
• Kick return ability
• Scoring threat

Weaknesses

• Size
• Strength
• Injury issues

Jaylen Waddle has one attribute that trumps all else, pure God-given speed. With a 4.27 40-yard dash time, he makes defenders look like they are standing in glue and is a threat to take every catch to the house. Whether it’s catching the ball or returning kicks, Waddle is dangerous in space and can change the game in an instant. To go with his speed, he has great hands and good route-running discipline. He is excellent at setting up his breaks and shaking defenders with his eyes or a head fake. All of these things combined with his open-field ability will make Waddle one of the best young deep threats in the game. If there is one negative about Waddle, it is his size. At just 5’10”, he is the shortest of the top three wide receivers in the draft by two inches. He will have to make up for what he lacks in size with his elusiveness. His ability to take the top off the defense and his skill after the catch is what will get him those chunk yards, not his size.

College Production

2020 stats – 6 GP, 28 receptions, 591 receiving yards, 21.1 YPR, 4 TD
Overall stats – 34 GP, 106 receptions, 1,999 receiving yards, 18.9 YPR, 17 TD

Although Waddle’s college stats didn’t break any records, scouts are convinced his skills will translate well to the NFL. He is projected to go in the top-fifteen in most mock drafts and after seeing the success of Tyreek Hill in Kansas City, many teams are making a spot for a burner like him on their roster. Aside from his receiving production, Waddle made a big impact returning the ball. During his sophomore season he was buried behind world-class wide receivers on the depth chart, but he contributed on special teams, with 20 punt returns for 487 yards and a touchdown, as well as five kick returns for 175 yards and a touchdown. Before his injury, in his final season at Alabama, his stats began to mirror his elite skills, and he compiled 557 yards in his first four games. Waddle is lethal in the open field, and with many of his former teammates playing on Sundays, he knows what it takes to play at the next level.

Best Landing Spot

Although many teams would love to have a dangerous deep threat like Jaylen Waddle on their roster, he fits some organizations better than others. One of the best spots for the speedy wideout is in South Beach with his college quarterback Tua Tagovailoa. Miami would be a perfect home for Waddle, and his speed would be a nice compliment to opposite WR Devante Parker’s size. Brian Flores has been building something special in Miami, and Waddle would fit into his plans well. His open-field quickness and deep threat ability would add an element that the Dolphins need to make that coveted playoff push they’ve been looking for.

Worst Landing Spot

Worst Landing Spot:
I’m sure they wouldn’t mind having another player like Tyreek Hill, but the worst spot for Waddle to land would be the Chiefs. It would make the most dangerous offense in the NFL even more dangerous, but it simply doesn’t make sense. Kansas City has the 31st pick in the 2021 NFL draft, so they would have to make big moves to have a chance at drafting the Alabama speedster. Not to mention they are paying Tyreek Hill a potential $22.8 million over the next two seasons. I don’t think we will see Waddle in KC.

Draft Range

Picks 7-15

NFL Comparison

When you watch Jaylen Waddle play football, a few different comparisons come to mind. John Ross, Brandin Cooks, DeSean Jackson, even his old teammate Henry Ruggs, whom he has the exact same 40-yard dash time as and is one of the fastest wide receivers to come through Alabama. But the best comparison in the NFL right now is Jaylen Waddle to Tyreek Hill. Their pure speed and ability to create separation are unmatched. Get them the ball, and the chase begins. Just like Hill, he has the spark to turn any play into a touchdown, and once he gets in the open field, everyone watching holds their breath. It is high praise to compare Waddle to one of the great game-changers in the NFL, but he has that kind of talent.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9.5 – Waddle is a pure burner. He has elite speed and will already be one of the fastest players in the NFL. With a good QB and a solid offensive scheme, he will have no problem succeeding at the next level.
Agility: 9.0 – Other than speed, agility is one of his top attributes. Get this kid the ball in the open field and the fireworks start. He will be dangerous in the screen game and slants across the middle.
Routes: 8.5 – His ability to trick a defender with his eyes or a headshake makes him tough to stay with off the line of scrimmage. He is good at getting the defender to open his hips, and then blowing by him.
Hands: 8.0 – He has good hands but has been critiqued for letting the ball get in to close to his body. With proper coaching and reps, this will improve.
Jumping: 7.0 – The jump ball is not one of his strong suits. Because of his 5’10” height and uncanny quickness, he is better utilized in open space, making defenders miss.
Size: 4.5


By: Russ Thomas @Rusty_Bill

Trey Lance
8
Trey Lance
Pick #8 – Panthers
NDSU, Sophomore, #4 QB, #6 OVR
20 yrs | 6’3″ | 224 lbs
Vision
7.5
Accuracy
7.5
Arm
7.5
Pocket IQ
7
Mechanics
7
Mobility
9.5
GP
16
COMP%
66.9%
PASS YDS
2,786
TDs
28
INT
0
RTG
180.6

Trey Lance is an extremely young QB who is coming out after just his sophomore season, in which he only played one game as the NDSU football season was canceled. Out of High School, Trey Lance did not have many offers; however, after just one starting season at NDSU, many slotted him as a first-round pick for the 2021 Draft. This was following a season in which Lance had a ridiculous 42 total touchdowns, 28 passing, and zero interceptions. At this point, Lance is securely in the conversation for the second through fourth-best QB prospect in the draft, alongside Zach Wilson and Justin Fields.

Strengths

• Good Velocity
• Mobile, Can Extend Plays
• Good Footwork
• Pre-Snap Awareness
• RPO Experience

Lance showed an incredible amount of raw talent in 2019. Despite playing for an FCS school, there is no doubt that Lance has what it takes to compete in the NFL. He displayed a very strong arm and pretty good accuracy. Something that Lance also excelled at was the mental game. I was impressed with his RPO reads and pre-snap adjustments, as well as his post-snap reads. This is something that, when yielded in the right offense, can dominate defenses. On top of all these attributes, Lance is extremely mobile and arguably even more fluid when passing on the run. Lance is a legitimate threat as a runner and also a passer when rolling out. This is something that the defense will have to plan for, as he can eat you alive on the ground.

Weaknesses

• Consistent Mechanics
• Post-snap Progressions Past 1st read
• Deep Accuracy
• Touch
• Vision as a Runner

Lance’s number one complaint coming out of college is the fact that there is only one-year of impressive tape, and that tape was against sub-par competition. However, the complaints I would have with that tape start with his deep accuracy. Lance has a strong arm, but he is not the strongest in this class. He sometimes struggles to make very deep throws. Another thing that Lance needs to work on is his touch on his intermediate to deep passes, as he does not lay the ball into spots like Zach Wilson or Trevor Lawrence. To be fair, those are two incredibly talented QB prospects. Lance can also be somewhat robotic with his motion in the pocket, and I believe he could generate more power with some tweaks in that motion. Lastly, one thing I worry about translating from college to the NFL is his rushing ability. Lance is undoubtedly athletic. However, his vision running the football was rather poor in the games I watched, as he often relied on the fact that he was stronger and faster than the defense to get massive chunk plays.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 16, COMP%: 66.9, PASS YDS: 2,786, PASS TD: 28, INT: 0, RTG: 180.6

Lance played a few snaps in 2018 and opted out in 2020; however, all of these stats are from his 2019 season, where he dominated the competition. There is little arguing with these numbers, as he was flat-out better than every opponent he went against with NDSU. He was efficient, explosive, and great in every game.

Best Landing Spot

I think that any quarterback would be lucky to go to the 49ers. Kyle Shanahan is simply an offensive genius. The team has a good line, good weapons in Ayuk, Samuel, and Kittle. The run game is consistently good no matter who the RB is due to Shanahan’s elite system. Simply put, the 49ers are a great offensive team for quarterbacks to thrive. I believe that Lance could start year one on the 49ers because I trust Shanahan to put Lance in positions to succeed. He could use Lances’ RPO talent, his mobility, and his arm talent extraordinarily well; probably better than anyone else. Almost every other landing spot, I would prefer Lance sit a year and learn, but on the 49ers, he could slot in right in and outplay Jimmy G.

Worst Landing Spot

The Chicago Bears are probably the polar opposite of the 49ers. You have a coach in Matt Nagy who thinks he is Shanahan, but in reality, he is a mediocre play-caller who often puts his QB in horrible spots to succeed. With Allen Robinson likely gone, the Bears do not have a real number one. I do love Anthony Miller’s and Darnel Mooney’s talent; unfortunately, Matt Nagy does not know how to use that talent. Lance would be thrust into a QB competition in a system that is simply not good. This is one path that I absolutely hate for Lance’s career trajectory, and I believe that the Bears would most likely waste, or worse, ruin his talent.

Draft Range

Picks 1-9

NFL Comparison

Yes, it is easy to draw comparisons to Carson Wentz when it comes to having successful careers going to NDSU; however, these two QBs are extraordinarily similar coming out of college. Both ran an RPO offense and had tremendous success. Both of these QBs have large frames, good arms, and were great out of the pocket while extending plays in college. Carson Wentz was an MVP candidate in his second-year and looked very solid as a rookie. I see this as a very plausible outcome for Lance. While Wentz has struggled recently, I chalk that up to poor coaching and injuries. Since Frank Reich left, Wentz has not been the same. I believe that Lance can see the same success that Wentz did early in his career if he is put in the right position with the right coaches.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 7.5 – Great vision pre-snap and makes good reads, will need to progress through targets better
Accuracy: 7.5 – Good, not great accuracy in college. The deep ball needs work
Arm Strength: 7.5 – Lance is strong and can hit a good velocity while throwing
Pocket Presence: 7 – Lance is very aware in the pocket and knows how to escape
Mechanics: 7 – Mechanics on the run are great; however, in the pocket, he could be more fluid and stronger
Mobility: 9.5 – An extremely mobile QB who will be a threat on the ground as well as rolling out to pass


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Micah Parsons
9
Micah Parsons
Pick #9 – Broncos
Penn State, Junior, #1 LB, #8 OVR
21 yrs | 6’3″ | 245 lbs
IQ
9
Athleticism
8.5
Pass Cover
8.5
Tackling
8
Run Def
7.5
Strength
9
GP
25
TACKLES
191
TFL
18
FF
6
INT
0

When you tune into a Penn State football game, one of the first things you notice is the sheer size of their middle linebacker. Weighing in at 245 lbs., standing 6’3”, and lining upright in the middle of the field, it’s hard to miss Nittany Lion LB, Micah Parsons. And NFL scouts haven’t either. After you get past the magnitude of this man, the next thing that takes you by complete surprise is his speed. Clocked at 4.4 in the 40-yard dash, Parsons should not be able to move so quickly for a man of his size. Seemingly running through blockers, he flushes out screens in the blink of an eye, and he stays with tight ends down the field like he’s a cornerback. This remarkable speed makes him a valuable chess piece that defensive coordinators can line up all over the field – which they love.

Since day one, Parsons has impressed on the football field. He is so versatile that with his speed and size, coaches had him running the ball in high school. His senior year, Parsons ran for 1,239 yards on just 109 carries, averaging over 11 yards per rush. Coming out of high school, he was a five-star prospect and ranked seventh overall in the 2018 recruiting class. The success continued as he transitioned into playing for James Franklin at Penn State. Franklin moved Parsons to full-time middle linebacker, and the decision paid off. In 2019, during his sophomore year at Penn State, Parsons made the leap everyone was hoping for. He emerged as one of the best linebackers in the country and amassed 109 tackles, 14 tackles for loss, five sacks, four forced fumbles, and five pass deflections. Parsons also led his team to a Cotton Bowl win over the Memphis Tigers, where he had 14 tackles, two sacks, and two forced fumbles. After ending his sophomore season on such a high note, the star middle linebacker chose to opt-out of the 2020 season and preserve his draft stock.

Strengths

• Strong tackler
• Hard hitter
• Great speed
• Quick step
• Good pass-coverage linebacker
• Great first instinct
• Blitzing ability
• Disciplined off of the field

Weaknesses

• Over-aggressive at times
• Runs around blocks
• Needs work shedding blocks

It’s hard to find weaknesses when profiling potential first-round draft picks, and Parsons is no different. If you use a magnifying glass, the linebacker has been critiqued for being overly aggressive at certain times. Given his speed and his knack for guessing right so often, this flaw is understandable and fixable. With proper coaching, he will learn to time the play better and anticipate the ball carrier instead of flying by him. On the other hand, the list of strengths for Micah Parsons is long. His natural speed gives him an elite blitzing ability, and he can fly to the ball. When he reaches the point of attack, which doesn’t take long, he knows exactly what to do, amassing 18 tackles for loss, 6.5 sacks, and six forced fumbles over his college career. Because of his sideline-to-sideline speed, Parsons is solid in man-to-man pass coverage, and he can cover a large area when in zone. His physicality and size mean he will be tough against tight ends and anything across the middle. Additionally, he is a terrific run defender who demonstrates an innate ability to beat blockers to the spot, often resulting in a tackle for loss. Parsons will be a great fit in a variety of defenses and would be a critical piece in any defensive coordinator’s game plan. He is just as impressive off the field as he is on it. During his opt-out, in between morning workouts, yoga classes, and physical therapy sessions, Parsons continued classes and completed a degree in Criminology.

College Production

2019 Stats – GP: 13, TACKLES: 109, SACKS: 5, TFL: 14, FF: 4, INT: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 25, TACKLES: 191, SACKS: 6.5, TFL: 18, FF: 6, INT: 0

After arriving at Penn State, Parsons saw action immediately. Coach Franklin moved him to middle linebacker exclusively, and the results soon followed. The LB compiled 82 tackles as a true freshman, including four tackles for loss, 1.5 sacks, and two forced fumbles. But his sophomore season is what gained him the attention of NFL scouts. Parsons was named an All-American and Big Ten Linebacker of the Year on his way to leading the Nittany Lions to a 10-2 regular season and a Cotton Bowl victory. He was responsible for an incredible 109 tackles, including 14 for a loss, five sacks, and four forced fumbles. After the Big Ten postponed their fall football schedule due to the pandemic, Parsons chose to preserve his draft stock and opt-out of the 2020 college football season. He is slated to be one of the most highly rated defensive prospects in this year’s NFL draft.

Best Landing Spot

The draft hype is real around the standout linebacker from Pennsylvania. Many analysts are naming him the best defender in the draft and predicting he won’t last past the tenth pick. If that is the case, a solid landing spot for Parsons is the Atlanta Falcons. Under the tutelage of defensive coordinator Dean Pees, Parsons could take the next step up the ladder to becoming an elite defender at the next level. Pees has been quoted saying he wants to implement a versatile defense built around varying surprise blitzes. Parsons can help with that. Also, when looking at Atlanta’s defensive numbers from last season, it is evident that they could use some assistance. The Falcons have the fourth overall pick in the 2021 NFL Draft, and it’s not far-fetched to think Arthur Blank uses it on a defensive game-changer like Micah Parsons.

Worst Landing Spot

Although there’s never a bad spot for an elite linebacker like Parsons, some teams don’t fit the bill because of salary cap issues. One of those teams is the Chicago Bears. The Bears are already paying Khalil Mack over $17 million per year, and he is under contract until 2024. They are also paying Robert Quinn over $12 million per year over the next three years. Not to mention, Chicago doesn’t draft until pick number 20, and I highly doubt Parsons will be available that late.

Draft Range

Picks 9-11

NFL Comparison

A few different linebackers drafted in recent first rounds have similarities to Micah Parsons. He resembles Tampa Bay’s Devin White in the way he flies to the ball. His size and speed are similar to that of the Bear’s young linebacker Roquan Smith. But the best comparison of a long-time NFL star is Micah Parsons to Bobby Wagner. Wagner is one of the best pass covering LBs in the league, and he has the versatility to blitz whenever necessary. The same can be said about Parsons. Also, Wagner is smart. He is the signal-caller and the quarterback of the defense. As mentioned previously, Parsons is the same way. He is a natural-born leader and controls the defense like a music conductor when he’s on the field.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9.0 – Parsons is intelligent on and off the field. On the field, he has a knack for knowing where the ball will go and is usually the first defender to it. Off the field, during his opted-out season, he completed his degree in Criminology.
Athleticism: 8.5 – For his size, Parsons has incredible speed. He will be a great tool for any NFL defensive coordinator.
Pass Coverage: 8.5 – One of his best attributes is his pass coverage. NFL scouts are excited about his ability to stay with physically demanding tight ends.
Tackling: 8.0 – Parsons is a physical tackler. He doesn’t miss many tackles and if he gets to the QB, usually he ends up in the dirt.
Run Defense: 7.5 – Parsons is a stout run defender, not afraid to plug the middle or chase down a screen in the flats. He could use some work timing his pursuit as well as getting off lead blockers.
Strength: 9.0 – Just looking at Parsons, you can tell strength isn’t something he lacks. He has a very disciplined workout regimen and holds power clean and squat lifting records at Penn State.


By: Russ Thomas @Rusty_Bill

Patrick Surtain II
10
Patrick Surtain II
Pick #10 – Cowboys
Alabama, Junior, #1 CB, #12 OVR
20 yrs | 6’2″ | 202 lbs
IQ
10
Speed
5
Agility
7
Man CVGE
9
Zone CVGE
7
TACKLES
8
GP
40
TACKLES
116
PD
25
INT
4
FF
4
FR
1

Patrick Surtain II, son of former NFL great Patrick Surtain Sr., is following his father’s footsteps. Like his father, Surtain is about to become an NFL cornerback. Unlike his father, he is about to be a first-round pick, possibly even Top 10. After three years at Alabama, Surtain is now entering the 2021 NFL Draft and is one of the highest-rated defensive players in his class. Likely the top cornerback and possibly the first defensive player drafted, Surtain finished his collegiate career with three great seasons. He came in as a true freshman and has started all 40 games for Alabama. Highly recruited out of high school, Surtain lived up to his expectations. He totaled 116 tackles, six for loss, four interceptions, and 24 passes defended. He also added in four forced fumbles, one fumble recovery, and a touchdown. In 2020, Surtain went on to win SEC Defensive Player of the Year. At 6’2”, 202 pounds, Surtain is a nice-sized corner who has a great football IQ. He has great field awareness and is capable of both pressing up on receivers and sitting back in coverage. Whether it is in the slot or on the outside, Surtain can move around on defense and is capable of keeping up with a team’s WR1. With his football genetics, athletic ability, and intelligence, Surtain is the best defensive back in this class and may even go on to have a better NFL career than his father, who was a three-time Pro Bowler and a First-Team All-Pro in 2002.

Strengths

• Size
• Football IQ
• Field Vision
• Pedigree
• Discipline

Weaknesses

• Not Overly Athletic
• Deep Ball

As far as 20-year old cornerbacks go, it is hard to really find any major concerns with Patrick Surtain II that should keep NFL teams from taking him early come April. He may not be the most athletic guy, but at his size, he has the potential to be a major part of an NFL secondary. One thing he will need to work on at the next level is his ability to cover the deep ball. His closing speed isn’t the greatest, and in the NFL, that could spell trouble. However, he should also be able to benefit from an NFL offseason as he looks to improve his biggest concerns. As for positives, there are plenty. Surtain played at Alabama, which usually means a smart and disciplined defender who is NFL-ready from the start. All of these are true for Surtain. He has great awareness, and he can play both in the slot and on the outside. He is not afraid to play press coverage and get physical with receivers, which is a must in the NFL. The ceiling is high, and the floor is as well. It’s not out of the question to think that Surtain could be in Canton in 20 years. Worst-case scenario, he is a Top 10 pick and plays 10+ years as an average corner in the NFL, which in today’s game is still very valuable.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 13, Tackles: 37, Sacks: 0, FF: 0, FR: 0, INT: 1, Pass Defended: 10
Overall stats – GP: 40, Tackles: 116, Sacks: 0, FF: 4, FR: 1, INT: 4, Pass Defended: 25

When you look at Patrick Surtain II and his stat sheet, it doesn’t tell the whole story. Surtain is the best defensive back in the 2021 draft class, and he had to play against some of the best offenses in SEC history throughout his career. Unlike a running back or quarterback, a sexy stat sheet doesn’t make a great cornerback. If you watch Surtain in action, it’s his ability to cover some of the best receivers in the country and take them out of their team’s offensive attack.

Best Landing Spot

When you look at the 2021 NFL Draft order, you will notice about nine or ten teams in the first 13 picks could use a player like Surtain. It is unlikely that a team like the Atlanta Falcons will take Surtain with the fourth pick. However, if the Dallas Cowboys are lucky enough to see his name still on the board when their pick rolls around at #10, Surtain should be headed to Jerry World to play on Sundays. The Cowboys’ defense last season was one of the worst in franchise history. While they have numerous holes to plug on that side of the ball, a potential star in Surtain would be a great start. Dallas could elect to go offensive line here to help better protect their franchise quarterback, but Surtain would be the better move right now. Assuming Dak Prescott can return to normal, the Cowboys’ offense will have enough to be a playoff team. It’s the defense that will make or break them in 2021.

Worst Landing Spot

It is hard to say that any team drafting Surtain would be a bad landing spot. Having said that, if the Cincinnati Bengals, who do need to address their cornerback issues, went with Surtain with the 5th overall pick instead of drafting a player like Penei Sewell to address their offensive line, that would be a bad move. For the Bengals, their offensive line has to be their main focus early in this draft. Joe Burrow was looking every bit what was expected of him before his season-ending injury. The Bengals need to protect the franchise. Drafting Surtain would hurt both his and Burrow’s careers, as well as any possibility of being a playoff team in the next three years.

Draft Range

Picks 5-15

NFL Comparison

Conventional wisdom would suggest that a great NFL comparison to Patrick Surtain II would be his father, Patrick Surtain Sr. However, not so much. Surtain II is about three inches and 10 pounds heavier than his father. He is also a better defender against the pass than his father was coming out of college. A better NFL comparison for Surtain would be Richard Sherman. They are similar in size (Surtain 6’2” 205 and Sherman 6’3” 205) and speed (Surtain 4.57 40-yard dash and Sherman 4.56 40-yard dash). Both guys have good length and can get physical at the line and take away a team’s top receiver. Like Sherman, Surtain is prone to getting beat deep on occasion, but other than that, it has very few cons. If Surtain has a career similar to Sherman, then no team will regret drafting him no matter what spot he is taken.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 10 – Great football IQ thanks to Alabama coaching and his father’s NFL experience.
Speed: 5 – His 4.57 speed is far from elite and is average at best.
Agility: 7 – Not the most agile player out there but nothing too concerning either.
Man Coverage: Surtain will play his best football in man coverage.
Zone Coverage: 7 – While he won’t be at his best in zone coverage, he is certainly no liability.
Tackles: 8 – Good tackler that wraps up well.


By: Calvin McAlee @McaleeCalvin

Kwity Paye
11
Kwity Paye
Pick #11 – Giants
Penn State, Junior, #1 EDGE, #14 OVR
22 yrs | 6’4″ | 272 lbs
IQ
8
Athleticism
7
Mechanics
7
Pass Rush
6
Run Def
8
Strength
7
GP
28
TACKLES
97
SACKS
11.5
TFL
23.5
FF
1
FR
0

Michigan continues to churn out these types of defensive prospects of late — the skillset is there and athleticism, but there is missing production. Kwity Paye fits that bill as he is an uber-athletic edge player who has a high motor that has caught the eye of many NFL scouts. Paye was only a 3-star recruit coming out of high school and is now headed to being a likely 1st round pick. He was a running back in high school and also competed in track and field. You can see his versatility in his mobility, which is going to help him a lot at the next level. While Paye is going to have some work to do to elevate his numbers at the next level, landing with a team that can develop good pass-rushers will be key for his rest-of-career outlook. Not only will a team be getting a high-ceiling pass rusher, but they will also be getting a great player off the field.

Strengths

• Hand Technique
• Athleticism
• High Motor
• High Football IQ

Weaknesses

• Lower Half Flexibility
• College Production

Paye is going to have a lot of people drooling over his athletic profile, but those who weigh college production will be looking at the other edge rushers in this draft. Paye was a pest in the backfield, especially on outside runs and read options. We saw him put pressure on the quarterback at a constant rate but not high enough nor with the numbers of some of the recent elite edge rushers like Garrett and Young. He is a little bit too stiff in his tape when it comes to his lower half, yet that shouldn’t be a deal-breaker. His hands and IQ are the two attributes I value the most in Paye. He has a strong bull rush move and combined with his speed and athleticism. It is tough to get around. Paye was not fooled often with play-action or any sort of option at the college level, and his play recognition skills are noteworthy. Coaches will also love the high motor he plays with, and he doesn’t turn off that switch either.

College Production

2019 Stats – GP: 4, TCK: 16, SACKS: 2, TFL: 4, FF: 0, FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 28, TCK: 97, SACKS: 11.5, TFL: 23.5, FF: 1, FR: 0

2020 was a shortened year, and he missed two games with a groin problem. I would point more towards his 2019 numbers, where he had 6.5 sacks and 12.5 tackles for loss. As mentioned above, he was only a 3-star recruit and was starting in Year 2. It is either going to be Paye or Rousseau, who we haven’t seen since 2019.

Best Landing Spot

Paye needs to find himself on a team that can develop him as a true pass-rusher at the next level. The athleticism and hands are there, alongside the IQ, but there are a few extra levels a team can unlock here. For Paye’s sake, landing on a team like Minnesota who has a proven track record of developing some elite pass-rushers.

Worst Landing Spot

The Raiders continue to be the worst landing spot for many players. The constant turnover between players and the staff is a concern. They have also failed to develop quite a few defensive prospects over the last few seasons. Since Paye is not one of those elite prospects like Garrett or Young, I want him to go somewhere where we have seen a staff develop young talent and have a set plan for them.

Draft Range

Mid 1st

NFL Comparison

Olivier Vernon is a name that comes to mind as someone who isn’t elite at any one particular thing but is going to do a lot of positives that might not show up in the box score. Vernon was best utilized in a 4-3 system, and the same would go for Paye. While athletic and speedy, he still lacks to be an edge rusher in a 3-4 system.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Strong IQ on run plays and takes smart routes to the ball.
Athleticism: 7 – Not elite speed but certainly above average and quick to the ball
Mechanics: 7 – Strong bull rush technique but will need to improve in other areas.
Pass Rush: 6 – Needs to develop more in this area.
Run Defense: 8 – Excellent in pursuit and reads plays well.
Strength: 7 – Good strength but will likely need to add a bit more to take the next step.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Caleb Farley
12
Caleb Farley
Pick #12 – 49ers
Virginia Tech, Junior #2 CB, #13 OVR
22 yrs | 6’2″ | 207 lbs
IQ
7
Speed
10
Agility
9
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
7
TACKLES
6
GP
23
TACKLES
43
PD
19
INT
6
FF
0
FR
0

With an influx of high-level quarterback and receiving talent into the NFL in recent years, there seems to be a lack of supply of quality cornerbacks. Several teams have defensive back as one of their top positions of need this offseason. Caleb Farley is a size-speed demon as he reportedly ran a 4.25-second 40-yard dash in high school. He was formerly a quarterback/running back and had 58 total touchdowns in his senior year, ranking third in North Carolina preps history. Farley had no plans to play on defense in college, but he has evolved into one of the best cornerback prospects in the country. He would have been the CB2 in last year’s class, right after Jeffery Okudah, had he declared for the draft, but he decided to return for his senior season before ultimately opting out of the season.

Strengths

• Elite speed
• Length and strength
• Physicality
• Ballhawk
• Fluidity/quickness

Weaknesses

• Clunky footwork
• Tackling
• Lack of press experience
• Never tracked receivers or flipped sides
• Hasn’t played since 2019
• Injury history

Caleb Farley is a top-end physical specimen with ideal speed and size for the cornerback position. He’s also a ballhawk in pass coverage – he had six interceptions across two seasons at Virginia Tech. The biggest concern for Farley will be his limited experience with press defense – he only played 58 snaps of press across two years in college. His footwork can come off a bit clunky at the line of scrimmage, and he needs some fine-tuning. He’s not a player you want running a lot of zone coverage at the moment as his main strength comes in matching all kinds of receivers step-for-step in man coverage. Farley also has a bit of a tackling problem with 21 missed tackles on 80 attempts, but that can be refined over time. One major concern is his injury history, as Farley had a non-contact ACL tear in 2017 and missed the last two games of 2019 with back spasms that bothered him all year long. Farley hasn’t played since 2019, but he clearly stands as an elite prospect at one of the most important positions in the NFL.

College Production

2019 stats – 10 GP, 14 tackles, 0 sacks, 12 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 4 INT
Overall stats – 23 GP, 43 tackles, 1 sack, 19 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 6 INT

Caleb Farley’s basic stats don’t tell the full story of a dynamic downfield coverage player with the ability to keep up with speedy players downfield. He only allowed 4 completions on a career 15 targets against 20+ yards downfield. He isn’t going to line up in the slot and doesn’t provide the same versatility as other defensive back prospects, but he has all of the traits of a high-end, lockdown press corner. Farley’s production may seem a little light, but he missed the entire 2017 season with a torn ACL before switching over from receiver to play cornerback. Farley proved his ability to be an elite cornerback in 2019 as he allowed a completion on less than 50% of his targets, and he was a first-team All-ACC honoree.

Best Landing Spot

There are several teams in the first round that would love to have a cornerback with Farley’s combination of size, speed, and strength. However, Denver stands out as an especially strong landing spot. The Broncos had serious issues at cornerback last season without any injuries, but at certain points of the year, they were down to just three healthy cornerbacks. A.J. Bouye was released prior to the start of free agency, and Denver heads into next season with Bryce Callahan as the only locked-in starting cornerback on the roster. Duke Dawson is listed as a starter in the team’s current depth chart despite playing mostly special teams to this point in his career. Michael Ojemudia, Essang Bassey, and De’Vante Bausby had opportunities to prove themselves last year, but they all disappointed. Vic Fangio’s defense is predicated on elite man-to-man coverage in the secondary, like what Kyle Fuller provided Chicago when they had the #1 scoring defense in the NFL. Farley’s physical profile makes him an ideal fit as a man-to-man boundary cornerback with the ability to cover a diverse variety of opponents.

Worst Landing Spot

It’s unlikely that the Lions will spend a first-round pick on a cornerback for the second-straight year, but that fit doesn’t make a ton of sense for a few reasons. Detroit will likely be in line to draft one of Ja’Marr Chase, Devonta Smith, or Kyle Pitts to add to an offense in desperate need of playmakers. It also wouldn’t help Farley’s early production to play on a defense with such a limited pass-rush as the Lions have – Detroit had just 24 sacks in 16 games last year. An inability to put pressure on opposing quarterbacks forced Jeffery Okudah into constant bad situations as a rookie, and that problem is likely to persist this season. The Lions do need to add a second cornerback alongside Okudah at some point, but that wouldn’t be the best use of their first-round pick at this point in time.

Draft Range

Picks 10-20

NFL Comparison

In looking for a strong comparison for Caleb Farley, I searched for cornerbacks who possess the same level of speed and size – there aren’t many. Baltimore’s Jimmy Smith ran a 4.42 40-yard dash at the combine and stands 6’2”, 210 lbs, so the physical attributes are right in line with Farley. Like Farley, Smith is at his best in press coverage and has the ability to cover a multitude of types of receivers on the boundary. He has the speed to stick with faster receivers downfield, as well as the size and physicality to work against bigger possession receivers. When healthy, Smith has been one of the best cornerbacks in the NFL and has long been underrated in the discussion of the league’s best at the position. Farley has that type of upside as a pro.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Nothing to write home about here. He got caught confused a handful of times in zone coverage and had a tendency to lose sight of his receiver at times. However, this is fixable.
Speed: 10 – Whenever Caleb Farley gave up a step at the line of scrimmage (which was rare), he would always have the ability to recover in coverage. Not even Chase Claypool could burn him.
Agility: 9 – Farley is a remarkably fluid athlete and he moves incredibly well in coverage. He uses his size to his advantage, but he moves much better than most players would at his size.
Man Coverage: 8 – Farley is going to be a very strong man coverage corner in the NFL, but his relative inexperience in press and his static alignment in college hold him back a bit for now.
Zone Coverage: 7 – While he certainly has the fluidity and physicality to play zone defense, his mistakes tended to come more in these sets and he’ll fare better in a man-heavy scheme.
Tackles: 6 – Farley missed 21 of 80 career tackle attempts, and that’s a concern heading into the NFL. It’s something that should be fixable through technique drills over time, but he gets a knock in this category for now.


By: Jacob Wayne @wayne_sports_

Rashawn Slater
13
Rashawn Slater
Pick #13 – Chargers
Northwestern, Senior, #2 OL, #11 OVR
23 yrs | 6’4″ | 305 lbs
IQ
10
PHYSICAL
9
MECHANICS
9
Pass Blk
8
Run Blk
8.5
Strength
7.5

Son of Reggie Slater, a former NBA player, Rashawn Slater was just a three-star recruit coming out of Clements High School in Texas in 2017. He earned just five scholarship offers but instantly became a starter at Northwestern and has been starting ever since. He has the ability to play any position on the offensive line, and in 2019 he was dominant at left tackle. In 787 snaps, he allowed no sacks and just one QB hit. Chase Young was the best pass-rusher in the country that season (and the eventual #1 overall pick), and Slater’s tape against him was better than anyone in the country. It’s unclear if Slater has the size to be a long-term starting tackle in the NFL, however. Slater’s polished technique and cerebral capabilities on the offensive line make him an early first-round pick, and he’s going to be a high-impact player wherever he gets drafted.

Strengths

• Foot quickness
• Processing speed
• Natural athlete
• Positional versatility
• Great cut-off abilities
• Clean footwork

Weaknesses

• Limited size and arm strength
• Doesn’t impose will at LOS
• Not ideal prototype for tackle
• Opted out of 2020

Best Landing Spot

Rashawn Slater is likely going to be forced to play at a tackle spot for one of the teams picking early in the first round with the level of demand at that position. However, his future that provides the highest upside for becoming a perennial Pro Bowl player is in the interior of the offensive line. The Cowboys seem to make the most sense as a potential landing spot for Slater with their transitioning offensive line that is still full of top-level talent. Tyron Smith could be released heading into next year with a $14 million cap hit on his contract, and Slater would make some sense as a replacement at tackle across from La’El Collins. The Cowboys have shown a willingness to play shorter players outside as Collins is 6’4” and Zack Martin, the perennial All-Pro guard, saw some time at tackle last year at 6’4”. In the long-term, after Dallas resolves the future of the tackle spot beyond Smith, Slater can kick inside to form one of the most dominant interior offensive line trios in the NFL with Martin and Joe Looney. The Cowboys have some other significant needs in the draft, but Slater’s versatility and incredible footwork make him a natural fit in Mike McCarthy’s West Coast offense.

Worst Landing Spot

While Rashawn Slater does have the ability to play at offensive tackle, he would be better-served landing on a team that allows him the flexibility to play inside as well. The Patriots likely aren’t that team as their offensive line is not one of their major needs this offseason. Shaq Mason, David Andrews, and Joe Thuney fared very well on the interior last year, while Isaiah Wynn and Michael Onwenu were dominant on the outside. New England also gets Marcus Cannon back after he opted out of the 2020 season. The scheme fit is also a question mark as the Patriots ran much more of a power-rushing scheme last year with Cam Newton under center – that isn’t ideal for a smaller, movement-based player in Slater. Newton is a free agent, but it’s unclear what New England’s offense will look like next season. The combination of a lack of clear-cut playing time right away as well as the potentially bad scheme fit makes this a poor landing spot for Slater.

Draft Range

Top 15 Picks

NFL Comparison

I hate comparing draft prospects to All-Pro players, but for Slater, the comparisons to Marshal Yanda are eerie. Like Slater, Yanda came into the NFL as a player with the versatility to play at tackle but not quite the size or strength to do so. He later became a full-time offensive guard for the Ravens and dominated in their movement-oriented, West Coast offense. Yanda is a future Hall of Famer who started in the NFL for 14 years and was named to two All-Pro teams. However, I truly do believe Slater has that type of upside as an interior offensive lineman. While he may start his career on the outside, Slater just might be a longtime high-level starting offensive guard like Yanda.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 10 – He always seems to be one step ahead of the defense thanks to his remarkable field vision and processing speed.
Physical: 9 – His footwork is absurd on tape and he moves better than some tight ends in the NFL. He will be able to play a major role in spread-out offenses featuring movement on the offensive line.
Mechanics: 9 – Slater is extremely fundamentally sound and it’s easy to project his technique and footwork carrying him for a long time as a starter.
Pass Blocking: 8 – At his somewhat limited size, Slater may struggle against some of the elite pass-rushers in the NFL if he lines up at tackle. If he’s starting at guard, this number goes up.
Run Blocking: 8.5 – A force in open space, Slater will thrive in an offense predicated on spacing the field and utilizing various ball-carriers. He’s not quite a road-grader, but he’s incredibly stout in the run game.
Strength: 7.5 – Slater isn’t going to be breaking any strength records at the combine, but that’s okay – what he lacks in foundational strength and physicality, he makes up for in technique and processing.


By: Jacob Wayne @wayne_sports_

Christian Darrisaw
14
Christian Darrisaw
Pick #14 – Vikings
Virginia Tech, Junior, #3 OL, OVR #16
21 yrs | 6’5″ | 314 lbs
IQ
6
Physical
8
Mechanics
6
Pass Blk
6
Run Blk
7
Strength
7

Just a three-star recruit out of Riverdale Baptist Highschool in Maryland, Christian Darrisaw’s only confirmed offer from a major program was Virginia Tech, with a few others from smaller schools. He hit the recruitment circuit as just the nation’s 171st-ranked offensive tackle and didn’t even crack inside the top-30 in Maryland alone. He has climbed quite a ways from his humble beginnings, however, as he’s got many teams considering using their first-round pick on a young man they see as their franchise left tackle. His experience and durability at Virginia Tech speak volumes alone. He won the starting left tackle job before playing his first career college game in his true freshman year and hasn’t looked back. He started all but one game in 2018, 13 games in 2019, and nine games in 2020, racking up weekly and yearly awards in each of his three seasons along the way. Another trait that impresses NFL scouts is his size. At 6’ 5’’ and 315 pounds, Darrisaw has molded his body to fit the ideal NFL offensive tackle. Perhaps what impresses scouts the most, though, is his athleticism. For his size, Darrisaw moves and bends remarkably well. His first step at snap allows him to quickly get into position, pull on running, plays exceptionally well, and burst to the next level when run blocking downfield. While his footwork could use some work staying in position as he’s pass blocking, his ability to lower his center of gravity and move laterally has NFL teams confidence that he can easily be coached up to a position where he can handle the speed and strength that will be rushing at him off the edge at the next level.

Strengths

• Size
• Quickness
• Athleticism
• Flexibility
• Lateral moving
• Pulling
• Getting to next level run blocking
• Anchoring in pass protection
• Coachable

Weaknesses

• Footwork
• Hand placement
• Awareness & football IQ
• Complacency / giving up on plays
• Aggressiveness

While Darrisaw’s combination of size and athleticism might have teams chomping at the bit, there are some drawbacks to his game that will need to be corrected for him to realize his potential at the next level. First is his footwork. Dropping back in pass protection, Darrisaw can at times attempt to use his upper body and hands more than moving his feet to stay in front of rushers. At the next level, with much tougher competition, that won’t get the job done. However, in theory, this is something that can be improved upon. Perhaps the biggest knock on Darrisaw is his complacency, which at times can look like a lack of football knowledge, and at times it can simply appear as a lack of aggressiveness. Either way, you’ll often see Darrisaw appear to give up on a play after an initial assignment or fail to finish off a block through the whistle. While some might question his awareness on the field, others might label it as being “soft,” or without a “mean streak.” For the sake of his progression as a player, hopefully, it’s the former. A lack of football knowledge is also something that can be improved through training.

Best Landing Spot

The Indianapolis Colts. Having developed one of the best offensive lines in football in recent years, The Colts will need to replace ten-year veteran Anthony Costanzo at left tackle, who announced his retirement after the 2020 season. If drafted by the Colts, Darrisaw would immediately be given the opportunity to win the starting left tackle position, a task that many believe he’s polished enough to handle were he to fall into the right situation. Either he wins the job and seemingly plays well enough to deserve it, or he sits for a bit and learns behind some of the best. Being surrounded by one of the best lines in football and immediately next to arguably the best guard in football, Quenton Nelson, makes it a perfect match.

Worst Landing Spot

The Cincinnati Bengals. I don’t envy the scrutiny that will be placed on the Bengals offensive line next season, as all eyes will be on the health of Joe Burrow’s knee, an injury that the offensive line has already had to take the blame for. While slotting in with the Colts would surround Darrisaw with above-average offensive line play, slotting in with the Bengals would do quite the opposite. The line, much as it has been in recent years in Cincinnati, is currently a disaster. Their promising young left tackle, Jonah Williams, will hopefully be healthy and penciled in at left tackle to start the 2021 season. Drafting Darrisaw would then likely lead to a position change to right tackle, which is not something he has done before and does not seem wise for somebody who might struggle with their football IQ. The positional change, and the weight of the world being put on him from day one to protect Joe Burrow, surrounded by below-average players, would not be setting Darrisaw up for success.

Draft Range

Early-Mid 1st Round

NFL Comparison

Jake Matthews. Many of the traits that Darrisaw is being labeled with are similar to that of Atlanta’s long-time left tackle Jake Matthews. In addition to being a similar size to Darrisaw, Matthews was also lauded for his athletic ability, flexibility, and lateral movement as a prospect coming out of college. The tape showed that he could pull really well, had a quick first step off the snap, could reach the second level well when run blocking, and whose ability to bend and lower their center of gravity made it possible to maximize their strength. Much like Darrisaw, Matthews was also a multi-year, experienced starter upon declaring for the NFL draft. Perhaps the most note-worthy comparison, though, is the lack of a “mean streak.” It didn’t prevent Matthews from being an above-average tackle in the league, and it shouldn’t prevent Darrisaw from being one either.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6
Physical: 8
Mechanics: 6
Pass Blocking: 6
Run Blocking: 7
Strength: 7


By: Zachary Boeder @ZacharyBoeder

Mac Jones
15
Mac Jones
Pick #15 – Patriots
Alabama, Senior, #5 QB, #15 OVR
22 yrs | 6’3″ | 214 lbs
Vision
8
Accuracy
7
Arm
6
Pocket IQ
7
Mechanics
7
Mobility
4
GP
30
COMP%
74%
PASS YDS
6,126
TDs
56
INT
7
RTG
197.6

While Mac Jones isn’t going to go inside the top-five like some of the other quarterbacks in this class, Jones might offer the best value if he falls to the mid-to-late first round. We have only really seen one year out of Mac Jones, where he threw 4,500 yards and 41 touchdowns in a National Championship winning season. There are plenty of strong landing spots for Jones as the top-two picks in the draft will be grabbing the top-two quarterbacks in this class. It will be interesting to see how teams go with Lance, Fields, and Jones. The Alabama quarterback is getting a lot of praise, and some even rate him as the second-best quarterback behind Trevor Lawrence. Jones has shown a high IQ, and his reading of the field might separate him from others in this range.

Strengths

• IQ
• Reading The Field
• Short Range Passes
• In-Pocket Mechanics
• Timing
• Touch Passes

Weaknesses

• Mobility
• Footwork
• One Year College Starter

Like some of the other Alabama quarterbacks who have come out in recent years, they all had exceptional receiving cores around them. Jones was no different, as two of his wide receivers are expected to go inside the top-20. He had his issues with accuracy at times, missing players high or underthrowing on the deep ball. Like Tua, the arm strength looks ideal but isn’t quite as exciting as you might think. While it isn’t a weakness, I wouldn’t call it a strength either. Jones did have throws where he let his receivers run after the catch, which is an overlooked part of his game. Jones reads the field well and has strong pocket mechanics, but we saw some struggles outside the pocket. He doesn’t have much mobility, and footwork became an issue as well. Playing behind the Alabama offensive line, this isn’t going to be notable to the average eye.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 13, COMP%: 77.4, PASS YDS: 4,500, PASS TD: 41, INT: 4, RTG: 203.1
Overall stats – GP: 30, COMP%: 74.3%, PASS YDS: 6,126, PASS TD: 56, INT: 7, RTG: 197.6

In 2019 we were able to see a little bit of Mac Jones as a sophomore. He competed for 68% of his passes over 141 attempts and had 14 touchdowns to 3 interceptions. 2020 was the big year for him, as he threw for 4,500 yards and had a 77% completion percentage. Jones led the Tide to a championship and finished third in Heisman voting.

Best Landing Spot

There are a few spots that would be great for Mac Jones. Starting with Atlanta, he would get to sit behind Matt Ryan and jump into a good receiving core when Ryan’s time is up. Denver and New Orleans are the two spots I like the most. Denver has an excellent receiving core and a good enough offensive line to help a rookie out. The Saints also have an exceptional offensive line, and with Sean Payton and Michael Thomas, Jones would have adequate personnel around him as he develops. Jones essentially needs a strong offensive line as any quarterback does, but even more so given his lack of mobility and footwork to make and extend plays.

Worst Landing Spot

With Chicago likely to lose Allen Robinson, the Bears pass-catchers will be thinned out despite some young names that might take another step. The offensive line play was average last season, and play-calling continues to be a question mark under Matt Nagy. Given Chicago will be after a quarterback, Jones could be in this range. With work still needed for Jones at this level, Chicago’s incompetence on the offensive side falls beyond just who is on the field.

Draft Range

Mid-Late 1st Round

NFL Comparison

While Philip Rivers is a little larger than Mac Jones, the mobility is about the same, and any play extension is non-existent. Rivers had good but not great arm strength, which falls into Jones’ scouting report as well. However, this skill set has a lower floor than most quarterbacks, given than desirable athleticism out of the pocket and non-elite arm strength.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 8 – Excellent vision and can make multiple reads.
Accuracy: 7 – Accurate on shorter/intermediate throws, struggles on the deep ball.
Arm Strength: 6 – Not a notable attribute of Jones’ but could be worse.
Pocket Presence: 7 – Limited sample in college due to elite o-line but was above average.
Mechanics: 7 – Good footwork within the pocket.
Mobility: 4 – Below-average mobility and ability to extend plays.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Kyle Pitts
16
Kyle Pitts
Pick #16 – Cardinals
Florida, Junior, #1 TE, #10 OVR
20 yrs | 6’6″ | 240 lbs
Hands
7.5
Routes
8.5
Agility
8
Speed
8
Blocking
5
Size
10
GP
24
REC
100
REC YDS
1,492
TD
18
YDS/REC
14.9

Kyle Pitts is an exciting name in this draft because he is technically listed as a TE based on what Florida labeled him as, but he is likely to be in WR roles at the NFL level. Pitts can play anywhere on the field, both inside and outside, as well as tearing it up from the slot. His worst trait is blocking, which he shouldn’t be asked to do much of anyway. At 6’6, he is a freak athlete with above-average speed and very good route-running skills. Pitts is going to be a nightmare for defenses to match up against. He is too big against corners and anyone else he can blow right by. Pitts is also just 20 years old,

Strengths

• Versatile Route Runner
• Fluid Hips & Quick Feet
• Lines Up Inside & Out
• Elite Size & Speed
• Only 20 Years Old
• Ability To Get 50/50 Balls
• Good Speed
• Strong Hands

Weaknesses

• Blocking

While some will have an issue with him being labeled as an in-betweener, Pitts has shown he can be of use in multiple ways. His movement and quickness for his size are often not seen, and he is also sure-handed. Pitts’ route tree is also off the charts, and in addition to him being a mismatch, the right landing spot could see him produce right in year one. If we are pointing out weaknesses, blocking isn’t his strong suit, but it isn’t from a lack of effort. This won’t be looked at regardless, given everything else he can do.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 8, REC: 43, REC YDS: 770, TD: 12, YDS/REC: 17.9
Overall stats – GP: 24, REC: 100, REC YDS: 1,492, TD: 18, YDS/REC: 14.9

Pitts began to emerge in 2019, where he had a 54-649-5 line. Last year, Pitts broke out for a 43-770-12 line in just eight games for Florida and ranked 10th in Heisman voting. Pitts played against a couple of strong secondaries in the SEC, but this conference is nowhere near what it used to be when trying to compare opponents. But he shredded Alabama for a 7-129-1 line, and his highlight game came against Ole Miss, where he went for 170 yards and four scores.

Best Landing Spot

Trades could determine the right fit for Pitts in this draft. If a team like Atlanta doesn’t settle on a quarterback and trades back, they would be in a range where I have Pitts going. Atlanta would be an excellent spot for him as he can be an efficient piece while Atlanta has their full cast, and eventually, Jones will depart, leaving Pitts and Ridley to be a strong 1-2 punch. Also, get Pitts on turf and let him do his thing. Now Atlanta doesn’t fall back and say Cincinnati doesn’t get Sewell for whatever reason. I love the addition to Cincinnati with him and Joe Burrow. Pitts just needs to find himself on a team with a stable quarterback situation.

Worst Landing Spot

Speaking of unstable quarterback situations, Pitts could find himself in New York at pick 11 if the Giants decide they need to add another weapon, which they do. Daniel Jones isn’t the guy of the future, and the Giants could be soon searching for another future quarterback. I am also not confident in the Giants using Pitts to his full potential either, given they run a very lackluster offense. In combination with the subpar quarterback play, this wouldn’t be ideal.

Draft Range

Early – Mid 1st

NFL Comparison

Because Pitts can play a versatile tight end and wide receiver, you can make multiple comparisons here. If we are looking at him from a receiving tight end threat, there are a lot of similarities to Darren Waller, who has broken out over the last few seasons. Waller is a big target but very elusive and has the speed to beat defensive backs off the line or in space. Waller ranked first in yards after the catch among WR/TE last season, and I can see Pitts finding his way high onto this list during his career.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 8 – Can get moving in open space, has home run potential after the catch.
Agility: 8.5 – Quick feet and hips make him an exceptional route runner.
Routes: 8.5 – Versatile route tree with the ability to line up all over the field.
Hands: 7.5 – Sure-handed and above average at 50/50 balls.
Blocking: 5 – Average blocker.
Size: 10 – Height gives him a mismatch on just about everybody.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Christian Barmore
17
Christian Barmore
Pick #17 – Raiders
Alabama, R-Sophomore, #1 IDL, #27 OVR
21 yrs | 6’5″ | 310 lbs
IQ
4.5
Athleticism
7
Mechanics
6.5
Pass Rush
8.5
Run Def
5.5
Strength
6
GP
22
TACKLES
63
SACKS
10
TFL
15.5
FF
3
FR
0

Christian Barmore is entering the NFL Draft after just his second season playing football at Alabama. The interior defensive lineman showed a lot in his first two seasons. Barmore was the 5th ranked defensive tackle in his class coming out of Neumann Goretti High School in Pennsylvania and so far has seemingly lived up to the hype. Barmore is undoubtedly best suited as a 3-Tech, something that has been becoming a little rarer in the NFL.

Strengths

• Pass Rush
• Explosive Lower-Body
• Quick First Step
• Good Hand Fighting
• Large Size for 3-Tech
• Versatile

Barmore really shines as a pass-rushing 3-Tech. He has an explosive base, a quick first step, and a knack for collapsing the pocket. His hand fighting is great, and it is clear that the pass-rushing side of his game has developed ahead of schedule as a redshirt sophomore. This is becoming more and more important in today’s NFL as the offense relies more and more on the pass. I would argue that he is a very good size for how quick he is and his position as a 3-Tech. At Alabama, he played across the line and was often required to do a lot of different things; this showcased his versatility to possibly fit in a 3-4 or multi-front defense at the next level.

Weaknesses

• Tackling
• Struggles Against Big Linemen
• Not Disciplined
• Shedding Blocks on Run

The weaknesses are really on display when it comes to the run game and screen game. Often times I watched Barmore struggle with a single blocker, and he was unable to achieve shedding the block. Barmore also got pushed back quite a bit by larger offensive linemen; this includes the pass, but especially the run game. This is a major red flag for me as every offensive lineman in the NFL is going to be strong compared to the average college guard. In the screen game, Barmore rarely had any awareness, and his lack of a 3rd year playing was really on display. I am worried that Barmore could be taken advantage of on the ground and by a savvy offensive play-caller.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 11 , Tackles: 37, Sacks: 8, TFL: 9.5, FF: 3, FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 22, Tackles: 63, Sacks: 10, TFLs: 15.5, FF: 3, FR: 0

Barmore’s college production as a DT was pretty solid. The 8 sacks on the season and huge production during the CFB National Title Game really boosted his NFL draft stock. However, he only produced one and a half other tackles for loss besides the 8 sacks. He needs to figure out how to utilize his strengths to get into the backfield and blow up run plays. If that skill is honed, a lot of my worries for him in the NFL start to dissipate.

Best Landing Spot

The Minnesota Vikings and Mike Zimmer’s defense is one of the few places Christian Barmore could play a traditional 3-Tech and really utilize his skills. Andre Patterson, the Vikings Defensive Line Coach, is one of the very best in the business. He has consistently turned later-round picks into startable assets, as well as turned Everson Griffen and Danielle Hunter into superstars. If you want to get the best out of your linemen, then you go to Patterson. Barmore would also be able to play alongside Michael Pierce, a big NT that will eat double teams up. This will allow Barmore a much easier time rushing the passer and getting into the backfield against the run.

Worst Landing Spot

While the Green Bay Packers have a talented roster and use for Barmore, I do not like the fit on this Packers’ defensive scheme. There is already some confusion as to what front will be lined up next year as Joe Barry has become the new Defensive Coordinator; however, apparently, he was not Matt LaFleur’s first choice. Barry has run both 3-4 and 4-3 fronts, and it seems like it will be a bit of a mix in 2021. I think that Barmore needs to focus as a 3-Tech, and him being utilized on the nose or at the edge as a 3-4 DE will not bode well for his development.

Draft Range

Mid 1st – Early 2nd

NFL Comparison

When I watch Barmore, I see quite a bit of Sheldon Richardson when it comes to comparing their pass rushing. Both use a bit of quickness and size to collapse the pocket and get to the QB. I believe that Richardson was a more well-rounded prospect coming out of college, but both do struggle to stop the run at times. I would argue that Barmore is currently a very raw but bigger version of a Sheldon Richardson-like player. As a 4-3 3-Tech, I think they play very similar styles.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 4.5 – Very raw coming out as RS Sophomore, needs to play with more discipline
Athleticism: 7 – Athletic for his size, a big 3-Tech
Mechanics: 6.5 – Good footwork, but the upper body could see quite a few improvements
Pass Rush: 8.5 – Great pass rusher for his size, explosive
Run Defense: 5.5 – Nothing special in rush defense, needs to secure more tackles
Strength: 6 – Often got pushed back by bigger college linemen


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Azeez Ojulari
18
Azeez Ojulari
Pick #18 – Dolphins
Georgia, Junior, #3 EDGE, #18 OVR
20 yrs | 6’3″ | 240 lbs
IQ
9
Athleticism
10
Mechanics
8.5
Pass Rush
9
Run Def
6.5
Strength
6
GP
39
TACKLES
68
SACKS
15
TFL
18.5
FF
5
FR
1

Azeez Ojulari was a prolific high school football player with over 100 tackles and eight or more sacks in each of his junior and senior seasons at Georgia’s Marietta High School. He was also a starting basketball player for the varsity team. He received over 30 scholarship offers and chose Georgia over a plethora of other high-level programs. In his junior season at Georgia, Ojulari broke through as one of the best pass-rushers in the country as he racked up 35 pressures, 9 sacks, and 8 QB hits. That earned him a nod as a semi-finalist for the Chuck Bednarik Award for the top defensive player in the country. He bested some of the best offensive tackles in the country like Alex Leatherwood. In the Peach Bowl, Georgia’s final game of the season, Ojulari opted to play and registered three sacks, two forced fumbles, and a safety – arguably, the best game of his college career. That game could have boosted his draft stock a bit, but there’s no doubt he’s one of the best pass-rushers in this class.

Strengths

• Consistently great speed off the edge
• Incredible at cornering offensive tackles
• Strong football IQ, reads and reacts to plays
• Always one step ahead of opposing blocker

Weaknesses

• Limited power at 240 lbs, concerns about run defense
• Only one year of top-level production
• Didn’t play more than 52 snaps in a game
• Pass-rushing technique needs some refinement
• Lacks ideal length for some schemes

With the prevalence of passing in the modern NFL, every team needs a multitude of capable pass-rushers to put pressure on the opposing team’s quarterback. Azeez Ojulari stands as arguably the best pure pass-rusher in this year’s class with his blend of speed, athleticism, and ability to read and react to plays. That cerebral element is often the missing link for a lot of players, and Ojulari has already showcased a strong understanding of the game. Teams will have doubts about his ability to produce in run defense as he’s a bit undersized at 6’3”, 240 lbs. He could certainly add some muscle, but there’s also the concern of losing some of his burst off the edge if he does. I believe athleticism and foot speed are much more important in the new NFL than traditional size and strength. Ojulari only had one year of top-level production at Georgia, and the Bulldogs were able to keep him fresh by limiting him to no more than 52 snaps in a game. Ojulari is an incredibly advanced pass-rusher for his age, but his somewhat one-dimensional game will cause him to drop in the draft. A borderline playoff team could get a huge boost from Ojulari by drafting him in the 20s.

College Production

2020 Stats – 10 GP, 31 tackles, 9.5 sacks, 12.5 TFL, 4 FF, 1 FR
Overall Stats – 39 GP, 68 tackles, 15 sacks, 18.5, 5 FF, 1 FR

Best Landing Spot

The Titans are top-to-bottom one of the most talented teams in the NFL, but their inability to get after the quarterback hindered their defense last season. Only two teams had fewer than Tennessee’s 19 sacks last year. New defensive coordinator Shane Bowen, previously the team’s outside linebackers coach, would be thrilled to work with a prospect with Ojulari’s talent. Tennessee’s offense is relatively set with Ryan Tannehill, Derrick Henry, and A.J. Brown leading the charge, but their defense has to improve to make them a real Super Bowl threat. Jadeveon Clowney is a free agent this offseason, and he may not return with the Titans’ limited cap space. Tennessee will also have a significant need at cornerback, but it’s likely that Patrick Surtain, Caleb Farley, and Jaycee Horn are off the board by the time their first-round pick (#22) comes around. Ojulari is an awesome fit in the variable blitzing defense we should see Bowen employ.

Worst Landing Spot

There are few teams that wouldn’t benefit from having a pass-rusher like Azeez Ojulari on their roster, but the Washington Football Team may be one of them. Washington runs a base 4-3 in which Chase Young (6’5”, 265 lbs) and Montez Sweat (6’6”, 260 lbs) are two of the bigger edge defenders in the NFL. Washington’s defensive scheme wouldn’t be a great fit for Ojulari, despite his clear talent, and he wouldn’t see immediate playing time with the level of pass-rushing talent on the roster. Washington should focus on an underwhelming offense with their first-round pick rather than adding a redundant player who is a poor scheme fit in Ojulari.

Draft Range

Picks 15-25

NFL Comparison

Ojulari reminds me a lot of another former Georgia outside pass-rusher in Leonard Floyd. Like Ojulari, Floyd was a bit undersized coming out of the draft, but he has been very productive off the edge to this point in his career. Floyd was a major contributor to the Rams’ top defense last year. Ojulari possesses more speed and athleticism than Floyd, however, and he’s likely to be more explosive as a pass-rusher off the edge. A popular comparison for Ojulari has been Ravens’ defensive end Yannick Ngakoue. Ngakoue ran a 4.75 40-yard dash at the combine; something Ojulari should be able to significantly surpass. Like Ojulari, Ngakoue has had some concerns in regards to his run defense, and both players may be better-served as pass-rushing specialists. If Ojulari is able to add significant muscle mass, his comparisons improve, as does his prospective future.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9 – Great read-and-react player, always seems to be in the right place. Phenomenal processing speed and ability to read the field.
Athleticism: 10 – One of the best athletes in this draft class with remarkable speed off the edge. He’ll skate by some offensive tackles in the NFL
Mechanics: 8.5 – Ojulari’s pass-rushing is obviously his biggest strength, but his mechanics could be cleaned up a bit more over time.
Pass Rush: 9 – Arguably the most well-developed pass-rusher in this draft class, he has a full repertoire and a clear ability to beat offensive linemen one-on-one.
Run Defense: 6. – At 6’3”, 240 lbs and with limited standing reach, Ojulari doesn’t have ideal measurables for run defense. Luckily for him, pass defense is much more important these days
Strength: 6 – He wouldn’t break any combine records for strength, and the lack of a power aspect to his game could hold him back from becoming a Pro Bowl-level edge defender.


By: Jacob Wayne @wayne_sports_

Rondale Moore
19
Rondale Moore
Pick #19 – Washington
Purdue, Junior, #5 WR, #23 OVR
20 yrs | 5’9″ | 175 lbs
Hands
8
Routes
9
Agility
9
Speed
9.5
Jumping
7.5
Size
3
GP
20
REC
178
REC YDS
1,915
TD
14
YDS/REC
10.9

You’ve heard the saying, “Speed kills.” That’s the case with Rondale Moore against college cornerbacks. The 5’9” speedster from Indiana and his 4.3 40-yard dash speed blow by defenders like they are statues. But Moore has always been fast. According to NFL.com, when he ran for too many touchdowns in a game as a pee-wee quarterback, they installed a mercy rule and forced him to throw with his off-hand the rest of the game. The success didn’t stop there. After helping his high school team finished the season 15-0 and winning MVP of the state championship, Moore was highly recruited and had offers from schools across the nation. He originally committed to the University of Texas but changed his mind and switched to Purdue at the last minute. Moore was the first four-star recruit the Boilermakers had secured in years. In his first appearance on the field against Ohio State, the flashy wideout did not disappoint, compiling 313 all-purpose yards and breaking the school record set in 1972. He added on a 76-yard touchdown reception and was eventually named Big Ten Co-Freshman of the Week. In his first season with the Boilermakers as a true freshman, Moore went on to rack up 2,048 all-purpose yards, which was the second-most in school history.

The following two seasons were plagued by injury for Moore, resulting in him playing just seven games total, which was a red flag for some NFL scouts. But it was the things he did off the field that kept his draft stock high. With no NFL combine this year, Moore relied on social media to get his skillset in front of the right eyes. In one video, he’s pictured underneath a standard jump-training-tool, and he bursts off the ground, smacking the color-coded vane and landing with an eruption of applause from his teammates. His vertical was measured at 42 inches that day. The next video is a classic scene. Squat bar, players cheering him on, and what looks like enough weight for a World’s Strongest Man competition. But below the bar and the plates is the 5’9”, 175 lb. wideout from Indiana. In that video, he squatted almost three and a half times his body weight – 600 lbs. His injuries make him a wildcard draft pick, but this kid has the work ethic and pure speed to excel at the next level. It will be fun to see where he lands.

Strengths

• Elite Speed
• Quick feet
• Good route running
• Dynamic, can play RB or WR
• Good balance
• Big play threat

Weaknesses

• Size
• Short wingspan
• Relies on YAC
• Contested catch issues
• Blocking downfield

Moore is like a video game – when he gets the ball in space, the fun begins. He shifts on a dime, and his outstanding balance lets him bounce off would-be tacklers. When he is healthy, he is virtually impossible to cover. His quick feet and solid release off the line of scrimmage make him a headache for any defensive back to stay with. One thing NFL scouts love about the shifty wideout is his ability to line up all over the field. At Purdue, he was used primarily in the slot but also lined up in the backfield as a faux running back. Although Moore is strong, he isn’t built like traditional wide receivers. At just 5’9”, he will have a tough time with contested jump balls in the NFL, which could make some NFL scouts hesitant. Also, with his limited wingspan, it could be difficult for him to adjust to poorly thrown passes. It will be interesting to see if he is drafted in the first round.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 3, REC: 35, REC YDS: 270, TDS: 0, YPR: 7.7
Overall stats – GP: 20, REC: 178, REC YDS: 1,915, TDS: 14

Although Moore’s overall stats aren’t that impressive, he did have a few standout games that scouts circled. In his college debut against Ohio State, he impressed the nation when he broke the school record for all-purpose yards, racking up 313. He would go on to win Big Ten Freshman of the Year and First Team Big Ten honors that year. His sophomore season started the same way when he put up 344 yards on 24 receptions in his first two games. All eyes were on the speedster at Purdue. But his next two games were a disappointment, with just five catches total before ending the season due to injury. In his final season as a Boilermaker, he once again had flashes of brilliance followed by unfortunate luck. He had games of 13 and 15 receptions but played in just three games total because of his hamstring injury. The few games he has on tape, plus his off-the-field work ethic, are the only things keeping Moore’s draft stock in the first round.

Best Landing Spot

A game-changer like Moore is best utilized in a high octane, run-and-gun offense. Although it’s not plausible, NFL coaches like Kyle Shanahan and Andy Reid would be lethal with a weapon like Moore in their arsenal. But the best fit for the shifty wideout is the Green Bay Packers. The Packers were a team that everyone expected to draft a wide receiver last year. Instead, they used their first-round draft pick on Aaron Rodgers’ replacement, Jordan Love, which raised lots of eyebrows. The Pack could desperately use a young slot receiver, and Moore would be deadly opposite the field from Davante Adams. I’m sure Rodgers would agree with me when I say Moore would be a great fit to play at Lambeau Field.

Worst Landing Spot

The worst team for Moore to be drafted to is the Las Vegas Raiders. Gruden and the Raiders used their first-round pick last year to draft Henry Ruggs III, the speedy wide receiver out of Alabama. I doubt the organization wants to use another top pick on the same type of player. Plus, they have far bigger things to think about with their quarterback, Derek Carr, with one foot out the door. I don’t see Las Vegas drafting Moore to play behind their own young prospect, Ruggs.

Draft Range

Mid-late 1st Rounder

NFL Comparison

The best NFL comparison for Rondale Moore is the wide receiver 49er’s Brandon Aiyuk. Moore will be best used in short routes like slants and screens, and he excels in the open field. Both guys have pure speed, and both will be utilized this year on jet sweeps and end-arounds. Aiyuk is used on punt and kick returns, just as Moore expects to be. Moore would be welcomed on any offense, but with Shanahan, he would really be an important chess piece.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9.5 – Moore is a speed demon. His trainer expects him to be clocked between 4.2-4.3 for the 40-yard dash, which will make him one of the fastest receivers in the NFL.
Agility: 9.0 – He is shifty and tough to bring down. Once he gets in the open field, he always makes at least one defender whiff.
Routes: 9.0 – He is an excellent route runner and has been recently quoted saying he has three different versions of releases for the slant route.
Hands: 8.0 – Moore is not much of a body catcher and mostly uses his hands, but he has had a few concentration-drops over the years.
Jumping: 7.5 – Because of his 5’9” height, he won’t win many jump balls, but he does have an amazing 42-inch vertical that will certainly help against bigger defenders.

Size: 3 –


By: Russ Thomas @Rusty_Bill

Alijah Vera-Tucker
20
Alijah Vera-Tucker
Pick #20 – Bears
USC, Junior, #4 OL, #19 OVR
21 yrs | 6’4″ | 315 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
8
Mechanics
7
Pass Blk
7
Run Blk
7
Strength
6

Due to the nature of this draft class, a team is going to be able to address an offensive line need a bit later and get a standout offensive lineman that has shown versatility in playing both guard and tackle. Alijah Vera-Tucker is coming out of USC and is coming off a fantastic season where he started at left tackle and moved over from guard in 2019. Vera-Tucker isn’t quite in the Sewell or Slater tier, but he is a top-five offensive lineman in this draft, with some viewing him as potentially the third-best behind those names. Whichever team drafts, Vera-Tucker will be getting a quick and athletic lineman who can play multiple positions.

Strengths

• Three-Year Starter
• Quick & Agile
• Good Footwork
• Gets To Second Level
• Mechanics
• Can Recover Well

Weaknesses

• Little Bit Undersized For Left Tackle
• Might Have Trouble With Longer Edge Rushers
• Limited In A Power-Blocking Scheme

The first thing that stands out is the athleticism and quickness Vera-Tucker has. It helps him recover and also drop back against quicker pass rushers. The footwork also feeds into this, and out of the offensive lineman, he has some of the better footwork. He can stand his ground against bull rushers due to his footwork but will struggle against some of the elite power-rushers in the game. Scouts will love the versatility where he can play both at the tackle and guard positions. His length is a slight concern, especially against longer edge rushers, but his athleticism helps him out once again.

College Production

Vera-Tucker was a three-year starter at USC and has been noted as one of the best in the Pac-12 year-after-year. Moving from guard to tackle, he exceeded expectations at both. Playing at USC showcased his strengths for playing in a zone-blocking scheme.

Best Landing Spot

Vera-Tucker should fall in this range with the Bears and Colts. It all depends on what the Bears do with this pick as they could move up and try for a quarterback or stay put and address other needs. The Colts are in need of a left tackle, and I love their system for Vera-Tucker. His versatility and athleticism would be a big help and fits perfectly with how they run the ball. He would also be playing next to some steller offensive lineman, and the Colts need a left tackle this offseason. However, his length could still push him more to guard.

Worst Landing Spot

There isn’t a bad place Vera-Tucker can go, as this range has a lot of suitors that would fit perfectly with his skillset. Any team that shoehorns him into being a tackle would be a downgrade.

Draft Range

Mid-Late 1st Round

NFL Comparison

Being athletic and versatile but a little bit undersized for a tackle, Shaq Mason comes to mind with plenty of similarities. Mason was undersized coming out of college, even more so than Vera-Tucker. However, the athleticism was off the charts.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Understands the game and can play multiple positions
Physical: 8 – Above average footwork and can get to the next level quickly
Mechanics: 7 – Good consistency in pad level and above average hand techniques.
Pass Blocking: 7 – Athleticism helped him deal with outside pass rushes.
Run Blocking: 7 – Good zone run blocking ability.
Strength: 6 – Not the most powerful lineman, but holds his own.j


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Jayson Oweh
21
Jayson Oweh
Pick #21 – Colts
Penn State, Sophomore, #4 EDGE, #21 OVR
22 yrs | 6’5″ | 252 lbs
IQ
7
Athleticism
10
Mechanics
6.5
Pass Rush
7.5
Run Def
7.5
Strength
7
GP
20
TACKLES
63
SACKS
7
TFL
13.5
FF
2
FR
0

Jayson Oweh is one of the few top Penn State prospects in this year’s draft class. Oweh is a redshirt Sophomore who is viewed as one of the better EDGE prospects in this class. However, he needs to land on a team that can develop him and is patient with his progress. Oweh has only played football for a few years. He is unseasoned and still has some size to add, but he has shown the upside. Oweh is likely headed for some early-down work before he has any shot at being an every-down guy. His speed and versatility could have him play in a variety of systems. Oweh does have all the tools to be a top-end pass-rusher in the NFL, but it is a matter of when he will hit that mark.

Strengths

• Explosiveness
• Speed
• Vertical
• Length
• Moves Off Edge
• High Motor
• Position Versatility

Weaknesses

• Football Experience
• College Production
• Smaller Frame
• Interior Moves

There are a few EDGE rushers that are similar in the sense of lack of college production and experience is a weakness. That is the case with Oweh, where he had some stretches where the production didn’t show up. But watching the film, Oweh did a lot that isn’t going to show up in the box scores, so this actually isn’t a huge concern for me. He does need to add some more interior moves and be able to diversify his moves a bit. After one move, he is a bit tapped out and needs to establish better second and third efforts. Oweh is extremely fast off the ball, and his speed and explosiveness are unmatched. Adding that to his high motor and length, you can see why he is viewed as one of the top rushers in this class. He is a truly gifted athlete with an immense ceiling.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 7, TCK: 38, SACKS: 0, FF: 0, FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 20, TCK: 63, SACKS: 7, FF: 2, FR: 0

As mentioned above, Oweh certainly has done more outside of the common box score, but we know some will look at the lack of production as a huge negative. He is raw still and did have one of the best pressure rates in the country last season.

Best Landing Spot

Given the potential to go later in the first round or early second, there is a wide range of options. Essentially the best path for Oweh to unlock his talent is to get him playing time. Buffalo is a spot where they can afford to give him some early-down work and let him develop into a strong pass rusher. The same goes for the Packers, who certainly need some help in the pass-rush department.

Worst Landing Spot

I will quickly echo my thoughts that the Raiders could be in line for Oweh, but the development of recent defensive picks is quite the concern. Atlanta is also another spot where I don’t trust the process to develop young defensive talent. Any place that limits his snaps early on in his career will be a lackluster landing spot.

Draft Range

Late 1st Round / Early 2nd

NFL Comparison

There is a growing list of speed rushers off the edge, and Oweh’s athleticism could set him apart. He has a high motor and plays as a larger Roquan Smith. His athleticism also reminds me of college Vic Beasley in his Clemson days.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Speed makes up for the lack of experience that shows at times.
Athleticism: 10 – Sheer quickness off the line, elite explosiveness.
Mechanics: 6.5 – Needs to clean up his handwork and ability to shed blocks.
Pass Rush: 7.5 – Needs to add 2nd/3rd options but has very good outside rush quickness.
Run Defense: 7.5 – Constant pest in the backfield and can close in outside runs
Strength: 7 – Needs to add some size to his frame but still above average strength


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Gregory Rousseau
22
Gregory Rousseau
Pick #22 – Titans
Miami, R-Sophomore, #2 EDGE, #17 OVR
20 yrs | 6’7″ | 265 lbs
IQ
6
Athleticism
8
Mechanics
5
Pass Rush
7
Run Def
7
Strength
6
GP
14
TACKLES
59
SACKS
15.5
TFL
19.5
FF
2
FR
1

As one of the more unique prospects in this year’s class, Gregory Rousseau might be a first-rounder despite not having played the last of his meager 14 career college games since December of 2019. Although he may not have the experience, Rousseau has the physical traits and one-year resume to jump off the papers and force front offices to consider using premier draft capital to take the 20-year old specimen. Rousseau played safety and wide receiver before switching to the defensive line his senior year of high school. Despite the lack of experience, his senior year and physical measurables made him a three-star recruit that led to his offer and commitment to Miami. Unfortunately, Rousseau broke his ankle in week one of his freshman year and received a medical redshirt. 2019, however, was a magical year. He exploded onto the national scene with 54 tackles, 19.5 tackles for a loss, 15.5 sacks, and two forced fumbles. Rousseau and his 6’ 7’’, 265-pound frame overwhelmed most of his competition, and particularly the interior lineman. Despite playing mostly on the edge, he demonstrated his versatility, also lining up as a three-tech and across from the center. He showed a knack for ripping away hands and using his length to keep lineman at a distance. Another impressive trait of Rousseau’s game is his commitment to run defense and his ability to contain on the edge. This remarkable season led to being named to the First Team All-ACC as well as being awarded the ACC Defensive Rookie of the Year honors. Unfortunately, circumstances struck once again, as he opted out of the 2020 season due to COVID-19 concerns. However, his one year of tape, his size, and the stamp of approval from Miami head coach Manny Diaz, who says he possesses the physical abilities that “can’t be taught,” have many teams envisioning Rousseau chasing down opposing quarterbacks for their defense for years to come.

Strengths

• Size
• Length
• Hand usage
• Energy
• Edge containment on run defense
• Positional versatility

Weaknesses

• Technique
• Rushing moves
• Strength and weight

Understandably so, Rousseau has been labeled as a bit “raw.” After all, he has played just two full seasons of competitive football as a defensive lineman. For this reason, it’s understood that many of the technical aspects that are required to be a defensive end in the NFL have yet to be developed. More often than not, you’ll see him going back to the same move. He tends to jump off the line and swipe away block attempts, attempting to slip around opposing lineman. He also relies on his length to keep opposing smaller lineman at bay. However, opposing lineman in the NFL will collectively be bigger and stronger, making it much harder for him to simply rely on out-bodying his opponents. As he refines his technical ability, he’ll also need to strengthen up and improve his flexibility. For his position, his 265 pounds comes in under the average weight. Even more drastically, his weight is roughly 20 pounds below the average defensive end, measuring 6’ 7’’ or higher. At this height, coming in underweight, with a tendency to stand upright when rushing sometimes, it is vital he improves his flexibility to keep his center of gravity low at the next level. At just 20 years of age, though, with so many physical gifts, these are flaws that many coaches believe they can correct.

College Production

2019 Stats – 13 G, 54 Tackles, 15.5 Sacks, 19.5 TFL, 2 FF, 1 FR
Overall Stats – 14 G, 59 Tackles, 15.5 Sacks, 19.5 TFL, 2 FF, 1 FR

One of the more unique and admittedly concerning characteristics of Rousseau’s draft profile is his lack of experience. One of his 14 career games at Miami took place in 2018, with the remaining 13 taking place in 2019, and he has yet to play since. After projecting to play a prominent role as a freshman in 2018, Rousseau broke his ankle in his first career college game and was forced to sit out the remainder of the season and obtain a medical redshirt status. He returned in 2019 healthy and played in 13 games before opting out of the 2020 season. This was all he needed, however, to show NFL front offices what he was capable of, as his 2019 stats alone, which included 54 tackles, 19.5 tackles for a loss, 15.5 sacks, and two forced fumbles, were enough to shoot himself up big boards so quickly that he could very well be taken in the first round of this year’s draft.

Best Landing Spot

The Jets or the Buccaneers. First, the Jets. We just witnessed Robert Saleh harness high draft capital into one of the most feared front sevens in all of football. From 2015 to 2019, San Francisco spent four first-round picks on defensive linemen and a third-rounder on Fred Warner. It took some time, but the pieces came together, and it led to a Super Bowl appearance for the 49ers. It’s a copy-cat league, and Saleh knows first hand the value of talent on the defensive line. Bringing in a physical specimen such as Rousseau without the immediate pressure to succeed on a rebuilding Jets team would be the first step towards replicating what he helped create in San Francisco. If not the Jets, playing for Todd Bowles and the Buccaneers would be a good fit as well. With very little gaps on the defending Super Bowl champs, and an already strong front seven, very little pressure would be applied on Rousseau to perform immediately. Instead, he could spend his rookie season gradually honing his body and his craft under the mentorship of defensive guru Todd Bowles, as well as two of the best, Jason Pierre-Paul and William Gholston. Then when both of those two hit free agency after 2021, Rousseau would get his chance to shine.

Worst Landing Spot

The Titans. For Tennessee, it would not be an issue of stability in the organization or leadership from the top. For Tennessee and Rousseau, the issue would be their need for a refined product that is ready to produce on day one. By all accounts, Rousseau is unlikely to be that guy but instead will need some time to pack on weight and refine his technical abilities. Tennessee has been flirting with Super Bowl contention for a few years now, and their defense is lagging behind their extremely potent offense. A first-round pick on a defensive prospect would immediately apply the pressure for instant production. For a team that signed Jedeveon Clowney to a one-year deal and will likely let him walk in free agency after ending the season on the injured reserve list, Titans nation is also desperately expecting the front office to bring in a play-maker from the edge. It’s not to say that Rousseau can’t be that player, but I’m not sure Tennessee has the luxury of patience waiting for his development, nor do they have the players around him to mentor his growth.

Draft Range

1st Round

NFL Comparison

When you look at Rousseau’s size, raw physical gifts, and age, coupled with a lack of technical ability, a high-end NFL comparison would be Vikings’ defensive end, Danielle Hunter. Coming out of LSU, the report on Hunter was nearly identical. He was labeled as “raw,” but a physical freak with the body that defensive coaches covet coming off the edge. He was the perfect pet project for a defensive coach to mold into a refined product, which is precisely what happened. He showed flashes his rookie season and really took off in year two under the mentorship of coaches Mike Zimmer and Andre Patterson, as well as teammate Everson Griffen. Given the right situation, a similar career arch could be in store for Rousseau.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6
Athleticism: 8
Mechanics: 5
Pass Rush: 7
Run Defense: 7
Strength: 6


By: Zachary Boeder @ZacharyBoeder

Jaycee Horn
23
Jaycee Horn
Pick #23 – Jets
South Carolina, Junior, #3 CB, #26 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 205 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
7
Agility
7.5
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
8.5
TACKLES
7.5
GP
30
TACKLES
101
PD
23
INT
2
FF
2
FR
0

Jaycee Horn is one of the top cornerbacks in this draft and is the son of former NFL wide receiver, Joe Horn. Playing on the other side of the ball, Horn has made a name for himself. He is a physical corner who can make plenty of plays. Horn fits very well in multiple schemes, especially where he can press. He has that high-motor and is an in-your-face style of cornerback. Any team will certainly like what he brings to the defensive side. Horn has good size and speed, where he can line up well with X-receivers in the NFL. The only downside to Horn’s game is that he will take some chances and guess wrong on routes, leading to big plays. However, he is just a few tweaks away from being a well-above-average corner in the NFL.

Strengths

• Preventing Separation
• Solid frame
• Not afraid to tackle
• Great in the air.
• Versatile in man, zone, and press zone.
• High Instincts
• Physical defender

Weaknesses

• Will struggle against elite speed with no help.
• Can take unnecessary chances at times.

Jaycee Horn has the perfect mindset for an NFL corner and his physicality is a big plus. Horn is able to press and be a bully at the line, making it tough for opposing wideouts to get ahead of him. He has a solid frame and good length, which help him in his tackling as well. The ball skills and IQ is high, although he will make a few overly aggressive decisions. The only real concern is that his speed isn’t great. He is hovering around 4.45 and 4.55, which could be trouble against true speed threats, especially off press coverage.

College Production

2020 stats – 7 GP, 16 tackles, 0 sacks, 6 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 2 INT
Overall stats – 30 GP, 101 tackles, 3 sack, 23 PD, 2 FF, 0 FR, 2 INT

Horn had a good 2020 and has been a starter for two years. He had a couple of tackles in the backfield and two interceptions after not recording any in his first two seasons. He was a second-team All-SEC. Horn also opted out halfway through the 2020 season.

Best Landing Spot

There are two NFC West teams that are in dire need of some cornerback help. The 49ers and Cardinals both have aging and free-agent looming corners. Horn would jump into a starting role right away and on teams with two solid pass rushers as well. These are also teams with impressive builds to compete, meaning Horn won’t be wasting prime years on losing teams. For selfish reasons, I would also like to see him go toe-to-toe against some of these elite NFC West wide receivers. New Orleans and Indianapolis would also be plus spots to land.

Worst Landing Spot

I don’t have a bad landing spot for Horn, as even some of the other landing spots like the Jets are certainly fine for him now that Adam Gase is gone. Even landing in a zone-heavy defensive scheme, he has held his own, even though he is best suited for a more pressing role.

Draft Range

Mid-Late 1st Round

NFL Comparison

Marcus Peters is a physical and not overly fast corner, who relies a lot on his IQ and sneaky agility to close in in passes. Horn is an eerily similar player and they both have that in-your-face-style mentality.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Good instinctive skills and ability to release and close down on runs.
Speed: 7 – Good speed but won’t match up against the elite speedsters.
Agility: 7.5 – Natural ability to cover fluid routes.
Man Coverage: 8 – Strong in press-man coverage and can hang in off-man but needs work.
Zone Coverage: 8.5 – IQ and his skillset make him strong in zone coverage.
Tackles:7.5 – Physical and willing to tackle, but needs slight improvement in tackling consistency


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Alex Leatherwood
24
Alex Leatherwood
Pick #24 – Steelers
Alabama, Senior, #5 OL, #25 OVR
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 312 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
8
Mechanics
7
Pass Blk
9
Run Blk
6
Strength
9

Alex Leatherwood has been among the top offensive linemen in the country in both high school and college, and it is likely he will continue that in the NFL. Leatherwood is built perfectly for an NFL offensive lineman at 6’6”, 312 pounds. As part of a National Championship-winning Alabama team that had one of the best offenses in college football history, Leatherwood was the staple on that offensive line. Leatherwood started every game for Alabama over his final two seasons. Not only does he avoid injury but he is one of the most skilled offensive linemen in his class, built perfectly for the NFL, and he is a good athlete who is quick for his size. In a draft class with great top-tier talent on the offensive line, Leatherwood would be a great first-round pick that could go on to have an excellent NFL career.

Strengths

• Three-Year Starter
• Quick & Agile
• Good Footwork
• Gets To Second Level
• Mechanics
• Can Recover Well

Weaknesses

• Little Bit Undersized For Left Tackle
• Might Have Trouble With Longer Edge Rushers
• Limited In A Power-Blocking Scheme

Leatherwood is a great all-around NFL prospect. He has the perfect size to be a great NFL lineman and he is also very athletic with great footwork and better than expected speed. He does his best work blocking in the passing game. While run blocking isn’t his best asset, he is still more than capable of being a solid run-blocking option. Perhaps his biggest weakness is his hands. He needs to improve that aspect of his game at the next level or defenders will be able to use that against him. Leatherwood is a very strong athlete but can lack the physical necessity that he will need to succeed in the NFL. However, that is not a major concern as that is something that can be rectified easily. Overall, Leatherwood is a top-level talent on the offensive line who has all the makings of a great NFL lineman.

College Production

Leatherwood won both the Jacobs Blocking Trophy for the best offensive lineman in the SEC and the Outland Trophy for best interior lineman in college football in 2020. He was also a two-time First Team All-SEC in 2019 and 2020 as well as unanimous All-American in 2020. He helped Alabama’s offense put up one of the best seasons in college football history. An experienced starter in the SEC against elite competition, Leatherwood will be a great asset for any NFL team.

Best Landing Spot

The Minnesota Vikings and Los Angeles Chargers both need help on the offensive line. If both teams elect to pass on Leatherwood for other options (such as Rashawn Slater and Christian Darrisaw), another team in the mid-to-late first round that could really use an offensive lineman would be the Pittsburgh Steelers. With Ben Roethlisberger a year shy of 40, the Steelers need to bolster their offensive line if they want to make another Super Bowl run in his career. The Pittsburgh rushing attack was one of the worst in the NFL last season. While Leatherwood isn’t the best run blocker in this class, he is a great pass blocker and a good enough run blocker that makes him a great fit in an offense that will likely be pass-heavy again in 2021.

Worst Landing Spot

The Chicago Bears are also in the market for an offensive lineman. However, the team has more important issues to address, such as the quarterback position and possibly wide receiver if Allen Robinson does not return. While the quarterback position will dictate whether or not this is a run or pass-first offense, the Bears’ are typically a more run-heavy team. This is another reason that Leatherwood wouldn’t be the most ideal fit as he excels more as a pass blocker. Instead of worrying about protecting their quarterback, Chicago should worry more about who that quarterback is going to be in 2021.

Draft Range

Mid 1st Round

NFL Comparison

Leatherwood’s 6’6”, 312-pound frame is similar to that of Pittsburgh Steelers’ offensive lineman David DeCastro who is 6’5” 315 pounds. Both guys were unanimous All-Americans and two-time First Team All-Conference in college. DeCastro and Leatherwood both have excellent movement and athleticism for their size. Like Leatherwood, DeCastro was regarded as one of the best offensive linemen in his class, being drafted 24th overall by the Steelers. Ironically, that is the same exact pick, 24th overall, that the Steelers have in this draft and could likely use to make Leatherwood and DeCastro teammates.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Great understanding of the game, learned from the best at Alabama.
Physical: 8 – Very athletic for his size. Great footwork and movement.
Mechanics:7 – Great footwork but needs to improve his hands at the next level.
Pass Blocking: 9 – Top-tier pass blocker.
Run Blocking: 6 – Solid run blocker but excels more in the passing game..
Strength: 9 – Very strong athlete with long arms and great size


By: Calvin McAlee @McaleeCalvin

Trevon Moehrig
25
Trevon Moehrig
Pick #25 – Jaguars
TCU, Junior, #1 S, #22 OVR
21 yrs | 6’2″ | 202 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
8
Agility
8.5
Man CVGE
9.5
Zone CVGE
7
TACKLES
9
GP
33
TACKLES
124
PD
21
INT
7
FF
2
FR
1

Trevon Moehrig was a 4-star cornerback recruit coming into his time at TCU, and he had over 15 scholarship offers from schools such as Baylor, Arizona, and Georgia, among others. Moherig’s coverage skills allowed him to transition to safety right away at TCU, a prudent move for his long-term prospects. He led all safeties in pass breakups over the past two seasons (20), and he’s a phenomenal defender at the catch point. Moehrig possesses an impressive mix of speed, intuition, and vision that help him make up ground on even the fastest receivers, especially with his ability to read the opposing quarterback. He’s also a punishing hitter and a great tackler, which along with his frame, suggest he could hold up at linebacker in the NFL if need be. Moehrig’s diverse skillset allows him to cover a wide variety of opponents, and his coverage versatility is going to be a beloved trait for his NFL team. TCU’s defensive alignment often required Moehrig to cover slot receivers, and he held up incredibly well in that regard. Whichever NFL team drafts him will likely have him play a fair amount of cornerback in nickel and dime sets. Teams drafting Moehrig to be a single-high, center-field type of safety will be a bit disappointed at his lack of range, but his unique skillset can be maximized in a number of other ways. The bottom line is that this Moehrig one of the best coverage defenders in this draft, and that alone should make him an easy first-round pick.

Strengths

• Length and strength help him dominate at the catch point
• Hard-hitting player who led the nation in pass breakups the past two years
• Coverage versatility – can defend wide range of players
• Can line up at safety, cornerback, even linebacker
• Explosive short-area burst and quick closing speed

Weaknesses

• Discipline needs work – often overly aggressive
• May not have the range to play as a single-high safety
• Balance was a problem at times, took himself out of plays
• Patience in run support needs work

Trevon Moehrig’s coverage ability is among the best in the draft, but his ball production is where he really stands out. He’s able to close ground on opposing pass-catchers and lay down punishing hits to force incompletions. He led the nation in pass breakups over the past two years, and has some highlight-reel takedowns to his name. Moehrig’s combination of length, strength, and speed allows him to take advantage of opponents at the catch point. A former track runner in high school, Moehrig possesses the short-area burst and closing speed to make plays across the field. His discipline was a bit lacking at times in college, and he will need to learn that patience is a virtue in the NFL as he gets better at waiting for plays to develop. He is often so determined to make a play that his balance gets thrown off and he takes himself out of the action. This specific facet of his game has to improve if he’s going to be playing near the line of scrimmage in the NFL. Moehrig does have the ability to line up at safety, cornerback, or even linebacker and make plays. He has the physical profile to suggest a future as a high-level run stopper, and his coverage and ball production are already NFL-ready. There’s not a ton to dislike about Moehrig’s game and he’s going to make an NFL defensive coordinator very happy as he’s such a versatile chess piece for a defense.

College Production

2020 stats – 10 GP, 47 tackles, 9 passes defended, 0 sacks, 0 FF, 0 FR, 2 INT
Overall stats – 33 GP, 124 tackles, 21 passes defended, 0 sacks, 2 FF, 1 FR, 7 INT

Moehrig’s stats may not stand out as particularly insane, but his role often put him at cornerback or split safety, so he wasn’t often rushing the quarterback or making plays behind the line of scrimmage. However, his consistency in regards to the more advanced pass-coverage metrics is impressive, and his talents are clearly translatable. Take a look at his highlights against Oklahoma State this year – he racked up 2 pass defenses, 1 interception, and 6 tackles as he made plays all over the field. Moehrig’s ability to read and diagnose plays was on full display in this game, as he blew up screens, broke up plays over the middle of the field, and even had an impressive long-ball pass breakup in the end zone. Moehrig’s hard-hitting nature and fiery playing style suggest he can be a real energy boost for a defense. Every NFL team needs more pass coverage specialists – Moehrig is that, and so much more.

Best Landing Spot

The Vikings are very much a team in transition with several holes on their roster. However, there may not be a more pressing need than safety with Anthony Harris a free agent this offseason and Harrison Smith a free agent next year. Minnesota’s pass defense struggled last year, but Cameron Dantzler and Jeff Gladney made strides as rookies and should be starting this year. Both Smith and Harris spent time at free safety and in more of a box role this past season, and even some time at slot cornerback. That role versatility plays right into Moehrig’s diverse skillset, and with Harrison Smith in tow, he wouldn’t be overburdened in his rookie season. The Vikings boast a defensive-minded coach in Mike Zimmer who would be beneficial to Moehrig’s early-career development, as well. The Vikings pick at #14, perhaps a bit earlier than some see Moehrig’s draft range. However, he would provide an instant impact on Minnesota’s defense and is the best player at a real position of need for the team.

Worst Landing Spot

At #17, it would be somewhat surprising to see the Raiders choose not to address a defense that allowed the third-most points per game in the NFL last year. Some draft analysts have already linked Las Vegas to Moehrig, the best safety in the draft. However, new defensive coordinator Gus Bradley’s scheme is not the best fit. Jonathan Abram, a former first-round pick, is likely to play the strong safety role closer to the line of scrimmage. This is the role that Kam Chancellor excelled in with Bradley’s Seahawks “Legion of Boom”. That would mean that the single-high free safety spot, Earl Thomas’s former role, is up for grabs. In this role, range and balance are arguably the two most important attributes, and those stand as weaknesses for Moehrig. His coverage capabilities would surely be useful somewhere for Las Vegas, but he’s not a natural fit for the scheme they are likely to run. Moehrig’s development would be better supported in a different landing spot.

Draft Range

First Round

NFL Comparison

The safety position in the NFL features a wide range of prototypical skillset, but Landon Collins is the guy who stands out to me as similar to Moehrig. Collins is able to fill a variety of roles on defense, but his best usage is as a defender in the box. At 6’0”, 216 lbs, Collins has more of the physical profile of a linebacker, and he uses every bit of his frame to be a bruiser in run defense. However, Collins matches that physicality with some elite slot coverage skills as he has the size to cover tight ends and the quickness to run with slot receivers. Moehrig needs to add some muscle before he’s the same physical freak as Collins, but his nasty hitting ability at his current size suggests he would be a menace with 15-20 more pounds of muscle. Moehrig also projects as a premier slot cornerback with the ability to cover a wide range of pass-catchers, and his versatility paints him in a similar light to Collins, one of the most versatile safeties in the NFL.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8: Moehrig is great at reading the entire field and diagnosing plays, although he sometimes plays too aggressively. If he can add some discipline, this number would rise.
Speed: 8: A former track runner, Moehrig is expected to run around a 4.6 40-yard dash, putting him in line with some of the better safeties in the NFL. More impressive than Moehrig’s long-area speed is his short-area quickness.
Agility: 8.5: Moehrig is a great athlete, and that particularly shines through when he plays enar the line of scrimmage. He can bounce off would-be tacklers to make plays behind the line or cover shifty receivers in short areas of space.
Man Coverage: 9.5: Moherig is dominant at the catch point and is one of the best pure man-to-man coverage players in this draft class. His diverse coverage skillset is a major strength.
Zone Coverage: 7: Moehrig isn’t the guy you want lining up as a single-high safety too often, and his lack of discipline can hurt him at times in zone coverage.
Tackles:9: One of the hardest hitters in this class, Moehrig knows how to lay down punishment on opponents. His read-and-react tackling with his frame suggests he would hold up at linebacker in the NFL.


By: Jacob Wayne @wayne_sports_

Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah
26
Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah
Pick #26 – Browns
Notre Dame, Senior, #2 LB, #24 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 215 lbs
IQ
8.5
Athleticism
9
Pass Cover
9.5
Tackling
7
Run Def
8
Strength
6
GP
25
TACKLES
142
SACKS
7
TFL
24.5
FF
5
INT
1

Nobody has ever quite figured out what position Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah plays. He was a three-star recruit coming out of Virginia’s Bethel High School in 2017 after a senior season in which he racked up over 70 tackles, 7 interceptions, 6 touchdowns, and five forced fumble while spending time at both linebacker and safety. That was just the beginning of his unreal playmaking as he was a force at Notre Dame. Versatility should be JOK’s fourth name as he embodies that characteristic better than anyone in this class. Need him to cover a shifty slot receiver who keeps racking up catches over the middle? No problem. Need him to hang in the box, diagnose plays, and fly to the ball to make tackles? Easy when you move like a gazelle. Some teams might be turned off by the fact that Owusu-Koramoah would immediately be the smallest linebacker in the NFL. There isn’t a long track record of guys his size succeeding at the position. Bobby Wagner (6’0”, 246 lbs), Fred Warner (6’3”, 229 lbs), and Lavonte David (6’1”, 234 lbs) are some of the perennial All-Pro names at the position, and they are much bigger than JOK. Even Darius Leonard and Roquan Smith, who are considered two of the smaller linebackers in football, play at about 15 pounds heavier than Owusu-Koramoah. JOK isn’t a thumper at linebacker and he won’t be able to sustain a large workload in between the tackles – he only played about 200 snaps there last season with Notre Dame. However, creative defensive coordinators will be able to leverage JOK’s talents in a multitude of ways. Ultimately, size is just a number. Owusu-Koramoah will let his tantalizing tape and Dick Butkus award (for the best linebacker in the country) speak for itself.

Strengths

• Versatility personified
• Smooth movement, never looks off-balance
• Elite explosiveness and burst
• Great read-and-react ability, playmaking instincts
• Phenomenal in coverage
• Semi-developed pass-rushing toolbox

Weaknesses

• Would be the smallest linebacker in NFL
• Likely can’t hold up in a between-the-tackles role
• Could stand to be more patient at times

College Production

2019 Stats – 12 GP, 62 tackles, 1.5 sacks, 11 TFL, 3 FF, 1 INT
Overall Stats – 25 GP, 142 tackles, 7 sacks, 24.5 TFL, 5 FF, 1 INT

The beginning of Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah’s career at Notre Dame was on the verge of being disastrous. He didn’t see the field as a redshirt freshman in 2017. Then, in 2018, after making his debut, he suffered a season-ending broken ankle in practice. JOK recovered from that rocky start as well as could ever be expected, showcasing his hard-hitting athleticism and explosiveness. Owusu-Koramoah has always played his best ball under the spotlights. In 2019, he capped off his junior season with four tackles for loss, three sacks, and a forced fumble in a rout of a bowl win over Iowa State. One year later, he pulled off an absurd forced fumble that he ran back for a touchdown in which he gracefully removed the ball from Clemson’s receiver’s hands in a standout game for the Notre Dame player. He was named the ACC Defensive Player of the Year and the Dick Butkus Award winner as the top linebacker in college football. He was also named to the AP All-ACC First team. The accolades underscored the technical development of one of the best athletes in this draft class. Turn on Notre Dame tape and you’ll immediately see #6 flying around the field. His movement is beyond impressive – rare is the combination of speed, short-area quickness, rapid change-of-direction, and balance that he possesses. It’s not a stretch to say this is the best coverage linebacker in this class, and despite being undersized, he has shown the instincts and movement skills to be a difference-maker in run defense as well.

Best Landing Spot

There are some teams picking in the middle of the first round who have a desperate need for defenders. Washington isn’t one of them, as they ranked 2nd in yards allowed and 4th in points allowed last season. However, Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah would be a dream fit for Ron Rivera and Jack Del Rio’s defense. Washington has a dominant defensive line featuring Chase Young, Montez Sweat, Jonathan Allen, and Da’Ron Payne, as well as a handful of strong secondary players. What they don’t have is a sideline-to-sideline playmaker, and JOK is just that. He would pair with Landon Collins as two versatile linebackers/safeties with the ability to cover in the slot. JOK would also be a strong fit with his ability to provide additional pass rush from the linebacker spot. Owusu-Koramoah wouldn’t be asked to be a plodder in the run game with the front seven talent that Washington already possesses, but he would be able to shine as a versatile playmaker behind one of the best defensive lines in football

Worst Landing Spot

The Seahawks don’t have a first-round pick this year as they sent it to the Jets in exchange for Jamal Adams, but Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah would not be a great fit with this team. Seattle covets larger, thumping linebackers like Bobby Wagner (6’0”, 246 lbs), K.J. Wright (6’4”, 246 lbs), Bruce Irvin (6’3”, 250 lbs), and last year’s first-round pick Jordyn Brooks (6’1”, 245 lbs). There’s no question that Owusu-Koramoah would provide a boost to what was one of the worst pass defenses in the NFL last season, but he would likely have to play primarily in between the tackles as Seattle uses nickel and dime on a lower rate than most teams in the NFL. This lack of versatility and innovative thinking isn’t necessarily a guarantee to remain heading into next season, but it would be odd to see JOK try to play in this somewhat-antiquated system.

Draft Range

First Round

NFL Comparison

Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah is representative of a changing of the guard at the linebacker position as teams will increasingly value coverage, versatility, and speed at the position. The two linebackers in the NFL right now who exemplify these characteristics are the Falcons’ Deion Jones (6’1”, 227 lbs) and Shaq Thompson (6’0”, 230 lbs). Both players provide a diverse skillset for their teams. Both are excellent in coverage (Thompson often slides into coverage in the slot), and both are solid run defenders despite being undersized. Jones had 5 sacks for Atlanta last season as a part-time pass-rusher, and JOK could produce similar numbers in a similar role. Both Jones and Thompson are about 12-15 pounds heavier than JOK, but he will likely be encouraged to add muscle early on in his development wherever he is drafted. No linebackers in the NFL are great comparisons for JOK, and he could become a long-term prototype at the position if things pan out for him.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8.5: Owusu-Koramoah is great at reading and diagnosing plays, using closedown speed to stop ball-carriers and receivers. His quick-trigger instincts are special.
Athleticism: 9: It’s not a major stretch to say that JOK is the best athlete among all of the defensive prospects in this draft. He moves better than most receivers.
Pass Coverage: 9.5: JOK has played an integral role in Notre Dame’s pass defense over the past two seasons and has shown the ability to cover wide receivers and tight ends out of the slot as well as anyone in the country.
Tackling: 7: He’s not a thumper and he’s not a true between-the-tackles linebacker as his lack of size limits his tackling strength. However, he makes up for his lack of size with remarkable instincts and field vision, as well as the speed to close space in a hurry.
Run Defense: 8: Owusu-Koramoah should contribute to his NFL team’s run defense by making plays behind the line of scrimmage and playing a sideline-to-sideline role, but his true strength is in pass coverage.
Strength: 6: Far from the strongest player in this draft class, it would be an uphill battle for JOK to be a long-term between-the-tackles linebacker in the NFL at just 215 lbs. Luckily for him, he has the versatility and technical skill to be utilized in a variety of ways.


By: Jacob Wayne @wayne_sports_

Rashod Bateman
27
Rashod Bateman
Pick #27 – Ravens
Minnesota, Junior, #4 WR, #20 OVR
21 yrs | 6’2″ | 210 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
8.5
Agility
8
Speed
7.5
Jumping
8.5
Size
8.5
GP
31
REC
147
REC YDS
2,395
TD
19
YDS/REC
16.3

In another draft class, Rashod Bateman would be considered a top-two wideout, but because of the quality, he is a little bit lower. Bateman is a tremendous athlete and a strong all-around wideout who can line up in a few different positions. Because of this class, there is also a chance he drops to a team with a stronger offensive pedigree to make him an impact player in year one. Bateman played his college ball over three years at Minnesota, where he averaged 20.3 yards per reception in his sophomore season and brought in 11 touchdown catches. There is a lot to like about Bateman.

Strengths

• Elite Hands
• Route Running
• Contested Catches
• YAC
• Deep Threat
• Plays Outside & Slot
• Adjusts On Broken Plays

Weaknesses

• More Disciplined Downfield
• Doesn’t Have An Elite Release

Bateman doesn’t have any tremendous weaknesses in his game. He is a bit overly aggressive downfield, which resorts to some pass interferences at times, but that’s something he can dial back. He also isn’t explosive off the line, but he makes up for it with very good route running ability and strong hands. Bateman can line up on the outside and in the slot, and despite a lack of explosiveness, his speed is still above average where he can work after the catch. His size and strength are going to be a mismatch against a lot of defensive backs, especially on contested balls.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 5, REC: 36, REC YDS: 472, TDS: 2, YPR: 13.1
Overall stats – GP: 31, REC: 147, REC YDS: 2,395, TD: 19, YDS/REC: 16.3

The college production is pretty sound here, especially in his sophomore season where he had over 1,200 yards and 11 touchdowns. His freshman year was also strong, with a 51-704-6 line. Bateman had a 29% target share in his final two seasons at Minnesota.

Best Landing Spot

I love the idea of getting any wide receiver to play with Aaron Rodgers, and there is a shot in this draft that could happen for Bateman. While they do need a field stretcher, Bateman’s versatility would be a plus. Jacksonville also picks at 25 and 33, where Bateman could be available. This comes after drafting Trevor Lawrence, and Bateman would be in the mix with Chark and Shenault.

Worst Landing Spot

With Chicago not having a competent quarterback since Jay Cutler, and even that is being generous, the signing of Andy Dalton gives me little confidence Chicago is going to solve this any time soon. Bateman is someone who can excel in space and needs a quarterback who can place the ball where it needs to be for Bateman to get moving up field. Batman would even fit in more with a gunslinging quarterback that can let him make plays downfield. Currently, that is not in Chicago.

Draft Range

Mid-late 1st

NFL Comparison

Bateman flashes some comparisons to names like Michael Thomas and Keenan Allen due to his route running, but he reminds me a lot of what Michael Crabtree was doing coming out of college and early in his NFL career. His route running and ability to find the ball in the air to make a place is on another level. But, what shouldn’t be overlooked is both him and Crabtree took a lot of short screens and passes in the open to turn them into big plays.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 7.5 – Not a world-class burner, but can move after the catch.
Agility: 8 – Quick feet allow him to be a tricky guy to bring down.
Routes: 8.5 – Polished route runner and has a versatile route tree.
Hands: 9 – About as sure-handed as you can get.
Jumping: 8.5 – Freak athleticism to get up and catch balls at the highest point.
Size: 8.5 – 6’2 with a great frame and long arms, tough matchup for most.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Asante Samuel Jr.
28
Asante Samuel Jr.
Pick #28 – Saints
Florida State, Junior, #4 CB, #36 OVR
21 yrs | 5’10” | 184 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
7.5
Agility
8.5
Man CVGE
8.5
Zone CVGE
6.5
TACKLES
7
GP
31
TACKLES
97
PD
29
INT
4
FF
1
FR
2

Asante Samuel Jr. is another defensive back in this class that stems from a former NFL player. He was a four-star recruit and spent his college days at Florida State, and is the son of Asante Samuel, a well-decorated former cornerback himself. Samuel could see himself go within the late first round or fall deeper into the second. However, this can be said for most defensive backs in this class. While the Florida State defense really fell off over the last few years, Samuel has had a strong season and is very good in man coverage. His size suggests he could be of use more as a slot corner at the next level, but he has sneaky good speed and strength to contend as an outside guy.

Strengths

• Great Footwork and Quick Feet
• High Motor
• Loose Hips
• Good Instincts
• Good Speed
• Disciplined
• Position Versatility

Weaknesses

• Finding The Ball In Air
• Slightly Undersized
• Needs Improvement In Zone Coverage

Asante Samuel has an attitude about him that you want to see in a cornerback. He is extremely competitive and attacks with tenacity. He plays above his size, which isn’t a huge concern for me but might be for some. He isn’t a burner but has good enough speed and footwork to keep pace in man coverage. His loose hips allow him to move fluently in routes and he has strong instincts as well. Samuel does need to improve in zone coverage, which he didn’t play a ton of in college, but when called upon, it wasn’t great. Finding the ball in the air is also an area of needed improvement.

College Production

2020 stats – 8 GP, 30 tackles, 0 sacks, 6 PD, 1 FF, 2 FR, 3 INT
Overall stats – 31 GP, 97 tackles, 0 sacks, 29 PD, 1 FF, 2 FR, 4 INT

Samuel put together a really strong 2019 and 2020 season, and 2019 was really when he began to put his name inside the rankings for defensive backs in this class. Samuel made a few All-ACC teams over his collegiate career.

Best Landing Spot

Given the scheme zone concerns, there are a few spots that could deploy him in a heavy-man coverage defense. The Titans and Falcons are in dire need of secondary help and use a lot of man coverage. New England and New Orleans are also in a range where he could fall too, and immediately fit right in. While we have him going late in the first, there is a good chance he slips into the second depending on how the draft shakes out.

Worst Landing Spot

A team that plays a high amount of zone defense will likely not look for a player like Samuel, but if for some reason they do, it might spell trouble (at least early in Samuel’s career) for him to adjust to the NFL. The Chargers have played a lot of zone coverage as have the Panthers, both are in need of cornerback help.

Draft Range

Late 1st Round – 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

There is a lot of his game that resembles his dad, but if I am looking at a few current players, Bradley Roby and Kyle Fuller come to mind as far as what Samuel can bring to the table. Samuel is somewhere in the middle of the speed of Roby and Fuller but presents a similar size and tenacity to their game.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Love the instinctive skills and ability to read routes.
Speed: 7.5 – Sneaky good speed, might surprise a few once numbers are released.
Agility: 8.5 – Quick feet and loose hips allow Samuel to move and cut at will.
Man Coverage: 8.5 – Samuel’s best attribute here, being able to stick on anyone.
Zone Coverage: 6.5 – Lack of experience might be the cause, but needs improvement.
Tackles: 7 – Willing to tackle, but body size makes him inconsistent at times.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Jaelan Phillips
29
Jaelan Phillips
Pick #29 – Packers
Miami, Junior, #5 EDGE, #34 OVR
22 yrs | 6’5″ | 266 lbs
IQ
6
Athleticism
8.5
Mechanics
7
Pass Rush
8.5
Run Def
5.5
Strength
6
GP
20
TACKLES
86
SACKS
12.5
TFL
23.5
FF
0
FR
0

Jaelan Phillips was a five-star recruit and widely considered one of the very best prospects in the nation when he came out of Redlands East Valley High School in 2017. However, after committing to UCLA, his collegiate career did not go as planned. In limited snaps, he did not really produce, as many expected, and then injuries really derailed his time with the Bruins. However, after transferring to Miami, his 2020 season has helped boost his draft profile into the first-round range. Phillips put on display his natural pass-rushing talent that had we had seen flashes of since high school. Phillips showed versatility playing several different spots on the EDGE, but one thing is clear, he is a pass rusher.

Strengths

• Big Explosive Rusher
• Great Agility
• Good Arsenal of Pass Rush Moves
• Played Standing and Hand on Ground
• Fast and Athletic

There is a ton to like about Phillips. For one, he’s 6’5 266 pounds and an absolute gem of an athletic freak. His size and speed are ideal for a pass rusher. He consistently showed great bend, which allowed him to get around tackles and get to the QB. On top of his natural talent, Phillips put on a great display of a variety of pass-rushing moves both from a standing position and with his hand on the ground. This has led many to believe he can play both 4-3 and 3-4 EDGE with ease.

Weaknesses

• Major Injury and Durability Concerns
• Shedding Blocks
• Improve as 4-3 DE / Hand in Ground
• Loses Contain in Both Rush and Pass

The first concern you read about Phillips is always his injury and durability concerns. With the injury history he had at UCLA, these are inevitably going to come up. However, I am worried about his rush-stopping ability, lack of discipline, and actual 4-3 ability. Despite his size, Phillips is not insanely strong and was abused on a few occasions by the tackle as teams rushed right at him. He also failed to shed blocks in times where it was vitally important against the run. When rushing the passer or containing the rush, he can be overzealous and too aggressive. His consistent tactic of rounding the tackle will not work against a mobile QB which will step up and move out of the pocket. Lastly, I do not think Phillips has the ability to be a 4-3 DE. His run stopping is not good enough, and his pass-rushing took a hit, in my opinion, when he had that hand in the ground. This is because he could not use his explosive first step from the standing position to gain leverage.

College Production

2019 Stats – GP: 10, TACKLES: 45, SACKS: 8, TFL: 15.5, FF: 0,FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 20, TACKLES: 86, SACKS: 12.5, TFL: 23.5, FF: 0,FR: 0

Most of Phillips’ production came in 2020, and just about all of it came in the way of pass-rushing. In the new NFL, where passing is king, Phillips’ talents are going to be well sought after. He was able to tally over a sack per game with 12.5 and collected 10 other tackles for loss in 2020, both impressive numbers. He also was able to collect a single interception in the Florida State game and had 3 total passes defended.

Best Landing Spot

The Denver Broncos would be a great fit for Jaelan Phillips’ skill set, and I believe that he can be somewhat of a Von Miller replacement. Now, there is no replacing Miller; he is an all-time great EDGE rusher and OLB in that 3-4 system. However, Phillips has the pass-rushing ability and natural athleticism to be great in Vic Fangio’s system. I also believe that he is athletic enough to play off the ball a couple of snaps and also is versatile enough to play 3-4 DE once in awhile. I trust Fangio to use Phillips correctly, and with Chubb rushing off the other edge, Phillips could have a monster rookie season.

Worst Landing Spot

The Dallas Cowboys could be a very poor fit for Phillips. I am not sold on Phillips being a 4-3 DE at all. I much prefer his skill set in a mixed and 3-4 front. While the Cowboys do have Lawrence, there is not a ton of talent on this squad, and I believe too much focus will be on Phillips for him to be productive. I think that there will be a much steeper learning curve at the NFL level for Phillips as a 4-3 DE and as such a vital part of the defense from day one.

Draft Range

Picks Mid 1st-Mid 2nd

NFL Comparison

Preston Smith is a big 3-4 OLB that I see as a similar player to Jaelen Phillips. Now, I actually believe Phillips may have more natural athleticism while Smith has more strength, but regardless, both of these players can get after the QB from that 3-4 EDGE spot. Like Smith, I believe Phillips has a bit of off-ball upside in certain situations, but both are best utilized as pass rushers. We also see Smith sometimes put his hand in the ground and show case a few different moves to get to the QB, something that Phillips showcased at Miami.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6 – Needs to rush smarter and keep contain in both pass and rush
Athleticism: 8.5 – Very fast and explosive, great 6’5 frame
Mechanics: 7 – A lot of his pass-rushing mechanics are good, but they can be better
Pass Rush: 8.5 – A natural pass rusher who will get after the QB, his best skill coming out of college
Run Defense: 5.5 – His athleticism makes up for a lot of weakness in his rush defending game
Strength: 6 – While Phillips uses leverage well, I believe that he needs to get a bit stronger at the NFL level, especially if draft to fit a 4-3 scheme


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Teven Jenkins
30
Teven Jenkins
Pick #30 – Bills
OSU, R-Senior, #6 OL, #32 OVR
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 320 lbs
IQ
8
PHYSICAL
9
MECHANICS
7
Pass Blk
7
Run Blk
9
Strength
9

Teven Jenkins was not a massive prospect coming out of High School when he committed to Oklahoma State in 2016. However, over his past two years as OSU, Jenkins has made a massive name for himself as one of the best offensive tackles in the Big-12 and the nation. He has a lot of things going for him and has received national recognition for his abilities at that tackle spot. Teven Jenkins sits at 6’6 320 and is undoubtedly a mawler of an offensive lineman; even coming out of college, he can instill fear into a defender with his size, speed, strength, and athleticism.

Strengths

• Strong run Blocker
• Keeps Blocks Engaged
• Great Hand Fighting
• Very Athletic for Size

Jenkins is one of my favorite run blockers coming out of college. Rarely does a guy this big move so quickly and is athletic enough to make blocks all over the field. On top of this, he keeps his blocks engaged due to his massive size and strength. When it comes to pass blocking, he does have very good hand fighting. He is an intelligent blocker who uses his size and leverage to help him win.

Weaknesses

• Limited size and arm strength
• Doesn’t impose will at LOS
• Not ideal prototype for tackle
• Opted out of 2020

Really the only two negatives watching Jenkins is that he is not particularly lengthy, and his footwork can be a bit of a mess when pass blocking. Ideally, you want your tackle, especially at this size, to have a longer wingspan to help on the edge, and that is something that you cannot fix but need to work around. Then, oftentimes his athleticism made up for shoddy footwork against good edge players. A good offensive line coach can turn Jenkins into an elite talent at the next level if he can fix this.

Best Landing Spot

The Los Angeles Rams have both a great scheme and situation for Jenkins. He would be able to, hopefully, sit a year behind Andrew Whitworth and learn the nuances of the game from him. The Rams also run a great run zone that Jenkins athleticism will shine in. If I am Cam Akers, I would love this draft pick as it will help unleash his talents. In a year’s time, I also think Jenkins can develop into a good or great pass blocker in the NFL.

Worst Landing Spot

While I think that Jenkins could help the Arizona Cardinals due to his great skill set, this is not great for Jenkins. Kliff Kingsbury’s scheme is not friendly to the run game or offensive line. Jenkins also would not have the luxury of sitting a year as the Cardinals are desperate for offensive line help. There also has been a lack of development in Arizona with linemen, which makes me worry that the offensive line coaching is not very good.

Draft Range

Late 1st Round- 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

I think Jack Conklin is not an unfair comparison for Jenkins. This could be the potential for him as a player. Conklin is a big athletic tackle who is great in the run and very good in pass blocking. Jenkins has similar measurables and may even be stronger than Conklin. These two players both can get to the second level as bigger tackles which bodes very well for zone scheme running.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Jenkins is a smart football player who seems to always pick out the right block and disengage at the right time
Physical: 9 – An extremely good athlete for his size. There will be more athletic tackles, but may none more athletic at 6’6 320lbs
Mechanics: 7 – His upper body is very good; however, the footwork in pass protection needs some work
Pass Blocking: 7 – His length and footwork hurt him here
Run Blocking: 9 – A very strong mawler that has the potential to be one of the best-run blocking tackles
Strength: 9 – Very strong, keeps his blocks engaged


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Wyatt Davis
31
Wyatt Davis
Pick #31 – Chiefs
Ohio State, R-Junior, #7 OL, #33 OVR
22 yrs | 6’4″ | 315 lbs
IQ
7
PHYSICAL
6.5
MECHANICS
8.5
Pass Blk
7.5
Run Blk
7
Strength
9

Wyatt Davis exploded onto the scene in 2019 with a great Ohio State team. After this season, many started to take note of Davis and start projecting him as one of the top linemen for the 2021 NFL draft. However, as it currently stands, in a front-loaded offensive line class, Davis has been bumped towards the back of the first round.

Davis played his high school ball at St. John Bosco, one of the best football programs in the nation. He came out of high school as the number one ranked offensive guard, and the 24th ranked national prospect in the 2017 class. After a single redshirt year, Davis was utilized as a staple of the Ohio State interior offensive line.

Strengths

• Strong
• Powerful First Punch and Step
• Good Feet in Pass Pro
• Keeps Blocks Engaged
• Great Effort Player

The first thing that stands out on film with Wyatt Davis is the power. The guard plays with an edge and excitement that sees him punching the defense in the chest over and over and over. The effort and power are clearly evident in both the run and pass game. In the passing game, his feet are rather polished for a collegiate offensive lineman. Then, in the run game, Davis does a great job of knocking defenders back and keeping them engaged.

Weaknesses

• Not Agile
• Struggles in Space
• Slow to Adjust in Pass and Run Game

The issues with Wyatt Davis really revolve around his agility. In the run game, he often struggles to make quick movements at the second level, which may lead to some key missed blocks in the NFL. Then, in both the pass and run game Davis is slow to adjust his body to an unexpected rusher. Often times stunts worked well on him at the college level. If he can learn to quicken his feet and make quicker adjustments, then he can excel as an NFL guard.

Best Landing Spot

I think that the Patriots could really benefit from grabbing Davis after losing Joe Thuney in free agency. Not only that, but the Patriots have a history of turning good collegiate offensive line players into elite ones. Davis surely has the physical attributes and football-IQ to turn himself into an elite guard, and with the Patriots coaching staff guiding him, that could be sooner rather than later. I also believe the Patriots run scheme could utilize Davis’ skill-set rather nicely. Especially on power runs.

Worst Landing Spot

The worst landing spot for Davis might just be the Minnesota Vikings. Not only do the Vikings run a zone-running scheme that is rather reliant on more agile run blockers, but the coaching staff has failed to develop any interior linemen over the past 10 years. Really, the only offensive line player that the Vikings have been able to develop at all is Brian O’Neil. The mix of the bad scheme-fit and horrible coaching could lead to Davies stunting his growth and never reaching his potential as a solid and powerful guard.

Draft Range

Late 1st-Mid 2nd

NFL Comparison

I think that Brandon Scherff is not an unfair comparison for Wyatt Davis. The biggest difference between Davis and Scherff, or really Daivs and any elite offensive guard, is the agility at the second level. However, both Schreff and Davis are solid pass blockers with great feet in pass protection. Both Schreff and Davis display tons of power in both pass and run blocking, using their 315-pound frames to keep blocks engaged. Brandon Scherff very well may be the ceiling for Wyatt Davis at the NFL level. For now, Wyatt Davis is a bit behind Scherff as a pass blocker and a tier or two below as a run blocker.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Wyatt Davis is clearly a smart football player but is sometimes slow to adjust
Physical: 6.5 – While Davis is strong and has a good frame, he is very stiff in space and needs to work on agility
Mechanics: 8.5 – Very solid mechanics both with his feet and his hand fighting
Pass Blocking: 7.5 – A good pass blocker that could turn into an elite one with the right coach
Run Blocking: 7 – Great in power runs but needs to work on second-level blocking
Strength: 9 – Extremely strong guard, and one of his best attributes


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Nick Bolton
32
Nick Bolton
Pick #32 – Buccaneers
Missouri, Junior, #4 LB, #37 OVR
21 yrs | 6’0″ | 232 lbs
IQ
7
Athleticism
6.5
Pass Cover
6.5
Tackling
8.5
Run Def
6.5
Strength
9
GP
32
TACKLES
220
SACKS
4
TFL
17.5
FF
0
INT
2

Nick Bolton was only a three-star recruit out of Lone Star High School in Frisco, Texas. He was 39th ranked ILB in the 2018 class when he committed to Missouri. However, in just a couple of seasons, Bolton has made a massive name for himself and is now talked about as a top-5 linebacker in the 2021 NFL Draft Class. Bolton stands out on tape with his quick acceleration and explosive hits. He has made plays both in the run and pass game that has shifted the tide of crucial matchups for the Missouri Tigers. Bolton is an all-around good linebacking prospect that many NFL teams may see as a year-two starter.

Strengths

• Hard Hitter
• Explosive Through Gaps
• Good Instincts
• Decent Zone Coverage
• Skilled Enough for Man Coverage

Nick Bolton is one of the hardest-hitting linebackers in this draft. When Bolton shoots a gap, he does it fast and does it with an explosion that is almost breathtaking. This is by far the most impressive part of his game and leads to a lot of tackles for loss. On top of this, Bolton demonstrates some good instincts, especially in the passing game. He is good at roaming the middle of the field in zone coverage and breaking up or intercepting passes. In man coverage, he has enough skill and knowledge to hold his own against running backs and tight ends.

Weaknesses

• Can be slow sideline to sideline
• Often got trapped behind blockers
• Too patient when diagnosing run
• Speed for size is below average

Nick Bolton is one of the hardest-hitting linebackers in this draft. When Bolton shoots a gap, he does it fast and does it with an explosion that is almost breathtaking. This is by far the most impressive part of his game and leads to a lot of tackles for loss. On top of this, Bolton demonstrates some good instincts, especially in the passing game. He is good at roaming the middle of the field in zone coverage and breaking up or intercepting passes. In man coverage, he has enough skill and knowledge to hold his own against running backs and tight ends.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 10, TACKLES: 95, SACKS: 2, TFL: 8, FF: 0, INT: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 32, TACKLES: 220, SACKS: 4, TFL: 17.5, FF: 0, INT: 2

Bolton had solid production as a middle linebacker racking up tackles and tackles for losses over his three seasons at Missouri. He came away with two impressive interceptions but unfortunately caused zero fumbles over the course of his three years. He was able to get the QB four total times and displayed some ability to pass rush. Overall, Bolton was the heart of the Missouri defense during his time with the program.

Best Landing Spot

Nick Bolton needs a great coach, and one of the very best at getting the most out of his linebackers is Bill Belichick. The team loves to use a variety of fronts and to run complex schemes that require linebackers who can rush and cover. I think that under Bellichick, Bolton could learn enough to become a great player for the Patriots. It is clear that Bolton has the ability to stop the run and can cover the middle of the field. Bellichick will love this duality and refine it.

Worst Landing Spot

The Philadelphia Eagles run a classic 4-3 defense. There has not been a lot of great productivity out of homegrown linebackers within the Eagles organization in recent years, which makes me worry about Bolton’s ability to grow as a player in Philly. On top of this, Bolton would most likely be asked to slip in the 4-3 MLB starting role from day one. This is not a responsibility that I believe Nick Bolton will excel at in his rookie season, or maybe ever. The Eagles would need too much out of Bolton too quickly, and that worries me.

Draft Range

Late 1st-Late 2nd

NFL Comparison

While much bigger than Bolton, I see quite a bit of Zach Cunningham in Nick Bolton’s game. The pair are both extremely strong inside linebackers who can stuff the run and put pressure on the QB with blitzes. Neither are extraordinarily great in pass coverage. I may even give the nod to Bolton there. However, they both are physical, high-effort players with below-average top speed but good acceleration. Cunningham is constantly around the ball, and you will find that same trait in Nick Bolton.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7.0 – Nick Bolton is smart and has good instincts but needs to diagnose running lanes quicker
Athleticism: 6.5 – Good reach and acceleration, but a bit undersized and slow when it comes to top speed
Pass Coverage: 6.5 – Good understanding of zone and man coverage can get the job done well
Tackling: 8.5 – Good tackler, hits hard but also wraps up and finishes the tackle.
Run Defense: 6.5 – Good at shooting into gaps, needs to take better angles
Strength: 9.0 – Very strong for his size.


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Terrace Marshall
33
Terrace Marshall
Pick #33 – Jaguars
LSU, Junior, #6 WR, #35 OVR
20 yrs | 6’3″ | 201 lbs
Hands
7.5
Routes
7.5
Agility
7
Speed
8
Jumping
9
Size
9
GP
28
REC
106
REC YDS
1,594
TD
23
YDS/REC
15.0

LSU has been churning out wide receivers left and right over the last few seasons. Terrace Marshall Jr is another one but has been overshadowed by Justin Jefferson and Ja’Marr Chase for much of his LSU career. Marshall is a great mix of size and speed, who is also a pretty polished route runner that can line up in multiple areas. In a deep receiving class, Marshall is going to be a solid value for whichever team lands him. He has had 23 receiving touchdowns in the last two years, and in 2020 he averaged 100 yards per game. While Chase and Jefferson have been the featured wideouts over the last two seasons, Marshall Jr was one of the top wide receiver recruits in the country coming out of high school, and the top recruit within the state of Louisiana. Essentially every major college was ready to hand him a scholarship offer. Marshall has a chance to be this year’s Tee Higgins, where he can go in the early stages of the 2nd round after a few big names, but carve out a strong year one.

Strengths

• Size
• 50/50 Balls
• Route Running
• Physical
• YAC
• Lines Up Everywhere
• College Production
• Red Zone Usage

Weaknesses

• Blocking
• Looks Ahead Before Catching At Times
• Lack Of Focus Causes Drops

There isn’t really a ton to knock Marshall about, which once again showcases how even this range of wide receivers can add to what should be a productive class. Marshall is an inconsistent blocker and does have some drop issues that mainly are just a lack of focus and being fundamentally sound 100% of the time, but this isn’t a red flag. His size and ability to track the ball are going to have him be a red zone threat at the next level but also someone who can make those 50/50 plays. He is physical and tough to bring down after the catch. Marshall doesn’t have that quick burst of speed but he does have very good buildup speed.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 7, REC: 48, REC YDS: 731, TD: 10, YDS/REC: 15.2
Overall stats – GP: 28, REC: 106, REC YDS: 1,594, TD: 23, YDS/REC: 15.0

In 2019, Marshall was third in line behind Chase and Jefferson. He finished with 13 touchdowns in 12 games and averaged 14.6 yards per reception. 2020 was his real-time to shine with Chase opting out for the NFL draft. Marshall would soon follow after seven games, but he racked up 731 yards and 10 touchdowns as a leading option and also no Joe Burrow.

Best Landing Spot

Given Marshall has been playing second-fiddle for the last few years, I’d love to see him get to a team where he can be a top-three option in the passing game. The Buffalo Bills and Washington Football team are two teams I would love to see him go to. Both lack passing options, and also a skillset like Marshall’s where they can be utilized heavily in the red zone and also be a more physical wideout. Pairing with a Diggs or McLaurin would be ideal.

Worst Landing Spot

Any spot where Marshall is going to be buried on the depth chart is bad news. We have seen WR-needy teams begin to add in free agency, and some landing spots just closed for guys who you’d want to immediately get targets. In this draft range, the Patriots would be a suboptimal landing spot given the run-heavy scheme, two TE priority, and no clear QB picture for the future as of now.

Draft Range

Early-Mid 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

If you can think back not too long ago to a prime Alshon Jeffery, there is a lot of comparisons to Marshall. Their size and ability to go up and get the ball is similar, and while they are not perfect route runners, both are above average. Jeffery went 45th overall back in 2012 and Marshall should find himself in a similar spot. Marshall does have a bit more athleticism than Jeffery, so the upside here is definitely worth chasing.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 8 – Build-up speed is excellent and can stretch the field.
Agility: 7 – Doesn’t have that elite burst but is sneaky quick.
Routes: 7.5 – Strong route runner and still has room to grow on his route tree
Hands: 7.5 – Needs to clean up mental mistakes that lead to drops but no real concern here.
Jumping: 9 – Great ability to find the ball and then the ability to go up and get it should not be overlooked.
Size: 9 – Listed as 6’3 but might be 6’4 now. Good solid frame and height.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Kadarius Toney
34
Kadarius Toney
Pick #34 – Jets
Florida, Senior, #7 WR, #40 OVR
22 yrs | 5’11” | 189 lbs
Hands
7.5
Routes
5.5
Agility
9.5
Speed
9.5
Jumping
6
Size
5.5
GP
38
REC
120
REC YDS
1,590
TD
14
YDS/REC
11.7

Kadarius Toney came out of high school in Alabama as a 3-star recruit in 2017. He was listed as the 25th ranked athlete in the class and received offers from Florida, Alabama, and Auburn. However, Toney settled with Florida, where he became a utility player that really never found his role.

This changed in 2020 when he played solely as a returner and slot WR. Toney showcased elite athleticism and speed that can go toe-to-toe with anyone in the class. He was able to run, catch, and return the ball with efficiency, and draft scouts started to take notice. His stalk has bounced around between the 1st and 3rd rounds, but it is clear that Toney has potential. He has only really played the position for one year, but it looked like he was catching on very quickly.

Strengths

• Great Speed, Acceleration, Agility
• One of the Best Athletes in the Draft
• Run After Catch is Elite
• Solid Hands
• Great Blocker

Kadarius Toney holds an insane amount of speed and agility that is rare among wide receivers. His ability to run after the catch or take a reverse to the house is not something you can say about any other WR in this draft. It is at a whole another level. Then, for only playing one-year as a true WR, his hands are surprisingly developed. He did not drop much of anything and knew where to high-point the ball. To go alongside the athleticism, Toney is an extremely strong run blocker for his size. This is something that coaches will look for in a gadget or slot player.

Weaknesses

• New to WR position
• Rounds off Routes
• Release Needs Improvement
• A Tad Lazy on Routes

Now, Toney is new to the position and still needs to refine his routes and release. His routes are much too rounded, but Toney does have the agility to improve this. With the right coaching and work effort, he can turn himself into a good route runner. His release is really not bad, but he sometimes is too slow with his moves at the line. Then, on occasion, you might catch him being lazy on a route. I will give him the benefit of the doubt that it is hard to go 100% every route when his QB, Kyle Trask, never looked past his primary read, and Toney knew he was not getting the ball.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 11, REC: 70, REC YDS: 984, TDs: 11, YDS/REC: 12.9,
Overall stats – GP: 38, REC: 120, REC YDS: 1,590, TDs: 14, YDS/REC: 11.7

Toney really only played wide receiver in his final season at Florida. He caught a lot of screens and was used quite a bit in the run game. On top of this, he was the returner and showed signs of explosive ability in that role. I honestly believe that Trask was a detriment to Toney’s stats; while you can surely do worse when it comes to college QBs, Trask missed several reads where Toney ended up wide open. Regardless, his final season was still impressive, and he did the most with his opportunity.

Best Landing Spot

I believe that Toney could do great things on the San Francisco 49ers. Yes, he has a similar skill set to Ayiuk and Samuel. However, it is clear that Shanahan is embracing the positionless player on his team, and Toney fits this mold beautifully. Shanahan knows how to scheme players into space, and when Toney is in space, he is one of the best players, if not the best, in this draft. This is a scheme and coaching staff that will utilize Toney’s strengths and help him work on developing his weaknesses.

Worst Landing Spot

The worst place I can see Toney going to is the Chicago Bears. Matt Nagy loves to use utility players but is horrible at actually scheming them open. On top of this, the QB and offensive line situation has been bad for several years. I do not trust Nagy to coach up Toney nor scheme him into the correct positions to succeed; however, unfortunately for Toney, Nagy will most likely want to bring him in.

Draft Range

Mid First-Early Third

NFL Comparison

I actually see quite a bit of Lavishka Shenault and Deebo Samuel in Kadarius Toney. However, one comparison that immediately comes to mind is Percy Harvin. While Toney is not as fast as Harvin, they are both ridiculously agile, strong, and tough to bring down. Harvin and Toney can be used as rushers, receivers, and returners. Harvin got better every year as a receiver in the NFL after starting out a bit raw on his routes, but his career was derailed by injury and severe migraines. Hopefully, this does not happen to Toney, and we can see what that kind of player can do in the NFL as a fully developed weapon.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9.5 – Very fast, and his acceleration is off the charts
Agility: 9.5 – One of the most agile WRs in the draft and can slip past defenders with ease
Routes: 5.5 – Routes are not terrible but need to be polished; his release also needs some work
Hands: 7.5 – Surprisingly great hands for his short career as a WR
Jumping: 6 – Good vertical but did not get a lot of jump ball chances
Size: 5.5 – Smaller at 5’11 195IBs, but plays a lot bigger


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Carlos Basham Jr
35
Carlos Basham Jr.
Pick #35 – Falcons
Wake Forest, R-Senior, #6 EDGE, #35 OVR
23 yrs | 6’4″ | 281 lbs
IQ
9.5
Athleticism
6
Mechanics
6.5
Pass Rush
7.5
Run Def
6
Strength
6.5
GP
42
TACKLES
173
SACKS
19.5
TFL
35.5
FF
7
FR
3

Carlos Basham Jr. was considered one of the better defensive line players in the country. His high motor and great football IQ allowed him to succeed at Wake Forest and torment opposing quarterbacks and running backs in the backfield.

Coming out of High School in Roanoke, Virginia, Basham was only considered a 3-star prospect and was the 97th ranked EDGE in the entire country. However, Basham put on weight and let his great mind for the game carry him to a starting role and eventually national recognition. He has been the underdog and thrived. He now sits as a day-two 4-3 EDGE prospect that will make an impact for an NFL team.

Strengths

• High Motor and Effort
• High IQ
• Uses Length/Leverage Well
• Productive 4-3 Pass Rusher
• Forced Turnovers

Basham is a guy that relies heavily on out-smarting the offensive opponent. He does a great job of utilizing leverage with his pass rush and setting guys up for a certain move. He also knows how to jar the ball loose and cause fumbles. He reminds me of Yannick Ngakoue in this way that any given sack has a good chance of leading to a fumble. He gives a load of effort and will deliver quite a few clean-up sacks due to this high motor. He maximizes his 6-5 frame by using his length to keep his distance from the tackle. This, in turn, allows him to make a move or shed the block to stop the running back. He is a proven productive 4-3 EDGE rusher at the college level that has the IQ to get even better.

Weaknesses

• Not Super Athletic
• Pushed Off the Line on Runs
• Minimal Pass Rush Moves
• Not Explosive Off The Ball

The downsides to Basham’s game really stem around his physical ability. He sits at 6’4 281 pounds but was often pushed off the ball by bigger tackles. This is a worry as the NFL will only throw strong, big, and developed tackles at him. Then, he lacks any kind of explosiveness or speed to really immediately blow-by tackles. This also hurts him in the run game as he is often too late to meet the runner or beat a block. Lastly, despite the high IQ, Basham still needs to develop a lot more pass-rushing moves. He is good at setting up blockers, but to successfully do this at the next level, he will need more moves and more refinement to his moves.

College Production

2019 Stats – GP: 6, TACKLES: 28, SACKS: 5, TFL: 4.5, FF: 4,FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 42, TACKLES: 173, SACKS: 19.5, TFL: 35.5, FF: 7,FR: 3

The thing that immediately jumps off the page when looking at Basham’s collegiate productions is the tackles for loss and forced fumbles. He was averaging a forced fumble for every seven tackles in 2020, an insane pace. It is clear that Basham can be a game-changer due to his knack for getting the ball out. Basham was flat-out productive over his four-year career at Wake Forest, and there is little to complain about.

Best Landing Spot

It is clear that Basham needs to go to a 4-3 scheme for him to succeed. He is not athletic enough to be a 3-4 EDGE, and he is not strong enough to be a 3-4 DE. This limits his NFL landing spots quite a bit. However, a team like the Minnesota Vikings or Tampa Bay Buccaneers could be great for Basham. Both these teams have good coaching, a good 4-3 scheme, and elite pass rushers in front of him on the depth chart. This will allow Basham to develop physically and mentally and hopefully rotate in as an efficient pass rusher his first couple seasons in the NFL.

Worst Landing Spot

I think the worst-case scenario for Basham is going to a place where he will be utilized outside of a 4-3 DE. This can be really any team looking to add a 3-4 DE or EDGE player. The Tennessee Titans come to mind when thinking of possible bad landing spots. The Titans have failed to really develop good EDGE players, and Basham would not succeed in the role he would be asked to play here. If Clowney could not put together a good season and figure out his groove on the Titans, then I doubt Carlos Basham Jr. can come in and do it.

Draft Range

2nd-Early 3rd

NFL Comparison

Carlos Basham reminds me quite a bit of Emmanuel Ogbah. While Ogbah has now moved to a 3-4 system later in his career, when he started out in Cleveland and KC, he was a traditional strong 4-3 EDGE. Their games are similar in the way that they both are not the strongest or fastest but rely on a good motor and their football-IQs to be productive. Both sit at 6’4 280ish, and both have produced as pass-rushers despite having no elite physical traits. I think that this is what a GM should be looking at with Basham, a good EDGE pass rusher who plays hard and will put up decent production, like Ogbah.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9.5 – One of the smartest EDGE players in the draft, relies on IQ to make plays
Athleticism: 6 – Good frame and weight, but no above-average physical traits
Mechanics: 6.5 – Needs to add to pass-rushing arsenal with more moves
Pass Rush: 7.5 – Productive and can be a rotational pass-rusher right away
Run Defense: 6 – Needs a lot of work as a run-stopping 4-3 DE
Strength: 6.5 – Strong, but not a standout trait, especially considering size


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Travis Etienne
36
Travis Etienne
Pick #36 – Dolphins
Clemson, Senior, #3 RB, #30 OVR
22 yrs | 5’10” | 205 lbs
VISION
6.5
AGILITY
8.5
SPEED
9
BALL SECURITY
6.5
HANDS
8.5
BLOCKING
5
GP
55
RUSH ATT
686
RUS YDS
4,952
RUSH TD
70
REC
102

Travis Etienne shocked many in the NFL Drafting community when he announced that he would return to Clemson for the 2020 season. This was quite a surprise as many considered him the number one running back in a very good class last year. At this point, it does not seem like his draft stock really moved from where it was prior to the 2020 draft. However, Travis showed some great improvements with the 2020 Clemson squad, like showcasing how elite of a runningback he could be in the passing game. Etienne has been the primary running back for three seasons at Clemson, consistently winning games and benefitting from the time with QB Trevor Lawrence instilling fear in the defense. Etienne came out of high school as the 15th nationally ranked running back and was elite for his entire four years at Clemson.

Strengths

• Fast
• Explosive Plays
• Receiving Back
• Balanced Runner
• Great Angles, Smart Runner

Travis Etienne is a very explosive running back. Etienne was known for consistently taking mediocre plays and turning them into 10+ yard gains in both the rushing and receiving game. He is a balanced runner with the ball who is hard to take down without wrapping up. It also helps that on the run, Etienne takes some great angles and is an extremely intelligent runner past the line of scrimmage. I think that the biggest plus is how much of a nightmare Etienne will be in the receiving game for those linebackers guarding him, as they simply will not be able to, and the defense will have to plan for that.

Weaknesses

• Vision
• Fell to First Tackler
• Blocking
• Fumbles
• Patience

Etienne reminds me of a bit of Jonathan Taylor in the way that both of them struggle to wait outruns and pick out the correct holes. From the time they get the ball until the end of the play, it is seemingly 100%, and there is little regard for the play to develop. Etienne also had 4 fumbles this past year, which is not a crazy amount, but is enough for me to worry. I also was surprised by how often Etienne fell to the first tackler when running the ball out of the backfield. Lastly, the part of his game that severely struggled was pass protection, and it will need work.

College Production

2020 stats – 12 GP, 168 RUSH ATT, 914 RUSH YD, 14 RUSH TD, 48 REC, 588 REC YD, 2 REC TD
Overall stats – 55 GP, 686 RUSH ATT, 4,952 RUSH YD, 70 RUSH TD, 102 REC, 1,155 REC YD, 8 REC TD

Travis Etienne had one of the best college careers ever for a running back. Totalling wins, rushing yard records, and more. He was a complete back, and there is little to complain about in the way of statistical numbers here. His yards per carry did take quite a bit of a massive dip in 2020, which may be cause for concern. It is also worth noting that with so many rushing attempts and games in college, his lifespan in the NFL may be shorter than other running backs.

Best Landing Spot

I believe that Travis Etienne would fit right in with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Now, I realize that Etienne struggles with blocking, something Arians demands out of his running backs. However, I think that this is something that Arians can force Etienne to get better at. With the job kind of wide open going into next year, Etienne would supply an incredible amount of playmaking ability on a team already filled with talent at every other position. I believe that Arians will make Etienne get better at the spots that are weak in his game while also highlighting what makes him special.

Worst Landing Spot

The Houston Texans are an easy team to go with for the worst landing spot for any player in the entire NFL. The organization may be the worst in all of American professional sports at the moment. Regardless, the Texans have a horrible offensive line and, if Watson stays, a scheme and QB that will not utilize Etienne’s best trait. The Texans have been a place that running backs’ receiving ability goes to die, and this is the #1 reason why I would draft Etienne. I really hope that this does not happen for Etiennes’ career’s sake.

Draft Range

Mid 1st- Early 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

I would compare Etienne to Alvin Kamara. Both are elusive 5’10 backs that are extremely speedy with big-play ability. Now, it is clear to me that Kamara is a much better talent at the moment. However, the two have very similar strengths as mismatches in the passing game. If a team drafts Etienne and uses the Kamara model that the Saints have set, I believe that Etienne can be ridiculously efficient as a pass catcher and pick up some huge chunks by getting to the outside on the ground.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 6.5 – I like Etienne’s vision once he gets going with the angles he takes, but he picks the wrong hole much too often.
Agility: 8.5 – Etienne can be very elusive, and he has fantastic balance; he could be more agile, but this is a big plus for him
Speed: 9 – Travis Etienne is one of the speedier running backs that you can draft in this class, and his top-end speed is great
Ball Security: 6.5 – There have been some ball security worries following four fumbles in his 2020 campaign.
Hands: 8.5 – Great hands and will have a place in this league for a long time as a receiving back, even if he flairs out as a runner.
Blocking: 5 – Needs to become a better blocker, from both a mechanics standpoint and a physicality standpoint


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Zaven Collins
37
Zaven Collins
Pick #37 – Eagles
Tulsa, Junior, #3 LB, #31 OVR
21 yrs | 6’4″ | 260 lbs
IQ
8
Athleticism
7.5
Pass Cover
8.5
Tackling
8
Run Def
8
Strength
8.5
GP
32
TACKLES
236
SACKS
7.5
TFL
25
FF
3
INT
5

Zaven Collins is one of the better linebacker prospects in this class and projects to go within the first two rounds. He is big and also has a strong pass-rush to go with his all-around game. Collins shows some solid speed when in pursuit and can make plays in space. He also has above-average ball skills and is above average in coverage. Collins is certainly going to be a three-down linebacker at the next level and teams that are looking to fill a quick need on the defensive side should have Collins high on their list. Collins has always had to work his way up, being listed as a three-star prospect and hardly recognized on the national level. A three-year starter at Tulsa has emerged as one of the top defensive prospects.

Strengths

• Size/Length
• Fits In Multiple Schemes
• Good In Coverage
• Ball Skills
• Pass Rush
• Run Defending
• Pursuit

Weaknesses

• No Elite Burst Off The Edge
• Not As Fast As Some Modern Linebackers
• Could Show More Assertiveness

It is really hard to find tremendous weaknesses in Collin’s game. Sure he may not have the speed of a prolific pass-rusher on the outside, but that’s fine. He still has an above-average pass rush and can also play very well in zone coverage. His IQ has been on display multiple times at the college level, where he has a real feel for the game and the ability to make game-changing plays. NFL teams are going to love Collins, who can play three downs and also in multiple schemes.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 8, TCK: 54, SACK: 4, TFL: 7.5, FF: 2, INT: 4
Overall Stats – GP: 32, TCK: 236, SACK: 7.5, TFL: 25, FF: 3, INT: 5

The production has been there since Collins stepped on the field at Tulsa. He is coming off a Bronko Nagurski award-winning season where he had 54 tackles in eight games, with six forced turnovers. His college career has been filled with accolades and now a likely first-round pick, you wonder why schools missed on him.

Best Landing Spot

With a couple of names on the Pittsburgh side leaving in the offseason, Collins would fit right into a terrific Steelers defense that has a track record for producing strong linebackers. They can disguise blitzes at a high rate, which Collins would thrive in this type of system that requires more knowledgeable players. In that late range, Cleveland would be another team that has a lot of help around Collins where he can freely play without pressure.

Worst Landing Spot

There continues to be a constant worst landing spot, and that is the Las Vegas Raiders. Given Collins ability, there isn’t a bad spot that would phase him out, but for his sake, we should want him with an organization that knows what they are doing.

Draft Range

Late 1st / Early 2nd

NFL Comparison

Collins isn’t going to compare to some of faster linebackers in today’s game but his ability to be a plus run defender and also be a very good pass coverage option, he reminds me of a couple of linebackers in Dallas, both Sean Lee and Leighton Vander Esch. Seemingly these guys do everything well but don’t necessarily stand out in any one department. This isn’t a knock by any means, Collins just has an ability to do a bit of everything.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Reads the game well and takes smart angles to the ball carrier.
Athleticism: 7.5 – Good athleticism for his size but not elite.
Pass Coverage: 8.5 – Excellent ability in pass coverage.
Tackling: 8 – Size and length make him an above-average tackler.
Run Defense: 8 – Attacks and has ability to get to point b very quickly.
Strength: 8.5 – Second effort strength and takes on blocks.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Elijah Moore
38
Elijah Moore
Pick #38 – Bengals
Ole Miss, Junior, #8 WR, #43 OVR
20 yrs | 5’9″ | 185 lbs
Hands
8.5
Routes
9.5
Agility
8.5
Speed
8.5
Jumping
7
Size
3
GP
31
REC
189
REC YDS
2,441
TD
16
YDS/REC
12.9

Elijah Moore went to high school at the famous St. Thomas Aquinas in Florida. The same school that spawned current NFL players, Nick and Joey Bosa, as well as Giovanni Bernard and James White. In Moore’s senior year of high school, he was named an Under Armor All-American after putting up 407 yards on 28 catches to go with five touchdowns. As a four-star prospect he had offers from 33 different schools before committing to the University of Georgia. He changed his mind and ultimately signed with Ole Miss, in what would prove to be a great decision once Lane Kiffin arrived. Moore became a critical piece in the Rebels’ offense as soon as he landed in Oxford. As a true freshman, he started in four out of 12 games and compiled 398 on 36 receptions and two touchdowns. He also contributed as a kick returner, averaging 18.5 per return. The wideout’s numbers continued to improve each year. His sophomore season he was up to 850 yards on 67 receptions and four touchdowns. By Moore’s junior and final 1,193 yards and eight touchdowns. The wideout was a First Team All-American selection and First Team All-SEC. He was a finalist for the Biletnikoff and Maxwell awards and NFL scouts were beginning to take notice. In the final game of his 2020 season, Moore drew an unsportsmanlike penalty for an impromptu touchdown celebration that raised some eyebrows. The penalty resulted in a missed extra point kick, and Ole Miss lost the game by one. We will find out on April 29th if Moore’s antics hurt his draft stock at all.

Strengths

• Fast
• Quick feet
• Good hands
• Good route-runner
• Big play threat
• Good body control

Weaknesses

• Character question marks
• No experience against press coverage
• Size
• Blocking

Overall, Moore is a speedster that burns grass as soon as the ball is snapped. All in one fluid motion, he plants his foot hard into the turf, jukes his head to one side, and bursts to the opposite direction. His crisp route-running and his deceptive speed allow him to separate from the defender effortlessly. Once he has the ball in his hands, watch out. He is elusive in the open field and his balanced body control allows him to escape shoestring tackles and stay on his feet. Like Tyler Lockett or Chris Godwin, Moore will be a coveted asset as a reliable slot receiver in a more and more pass-heavy league. If he lands in the right system, he should have no trouble succeeding. But with the positives come negatives too. The wideout from Ole Miss raised eyebrows at the end of the 2019 season when he mimicked a dog urinating in the end zone after a touchdown reception with four seconds left against in-state rival Mississippi State. The display drew a 15-yard penalty flag resulting in a missed extra point and Ole Miss lost the game 21-20. Moore’s red flags with his character and his size may result in him falling into the second round or further on draft day.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 8, REC: 86, REC YDS: 1,193, TDS: 8
Overall stats – GP: 31, REC: 189, REC YDS: 2,441, TDS: 16

Moore has always lit up the stat sheet. The four-star recruit and 33rd ranked high school football player in the state of Florida is no stranger to success. When he made his first career start as a freshman at Ole Miss, Moore led the receiving corps with 11 receptions and 129 yards, breaking the record for most receptions ever by a freshman Rebel wide receiver. His success continued into his sophomore year, where he started all 12 games and went over 100 yards receiving in four of them. NFL scouts began to take notice during Moore’s senior year, when he led the FBS with 10.8 receptions and 149.1 receiving yards per game. He would go on to break current Tennessee Titan’s WR AJ Brown’s season reception record, putting up 86 catches in just eight games. Moore is the only receiver in the history of Ole Miss to go over 200 yards receiving in three games, all of which came in the 2020 season. He already has his name etched in the record books in Oxford, is Canton next?

Best Landing Spot

Lots of NFL teams could use a speed demon like Elijah Moore on their roster. He is quick, reliable, and immediately fills an important role. There are certain teams that need a slot receiver more than others, like the Patriots, Saints, Packers, Falcons and Dolphins. All these teams would be a great fit for the Rebel wideout, but I think the best fit is the New England Patriots. Two years ago, the Patriots used their first-round draft pick to draft N’Keal Harry. The pick has been nothing short of a bust since Harry has caught just 45 passes in two seasons. In last year’s NFL draft, the Pats went a different route and didn’t draft any wide receivers. The mistake was evident, as Cam Newton struggled to find anyone open all season. I think this year could be different. Moore would improve under the tutelage of Bill Belichick, and he would see playing time almost immediately. It’s a bit unlikely, but don’t be surprised if Robert Kraft called Moore’s name on April 29th.

Worst Landing Spot

There aren’t too many bad landing spots for a playmaker like Elijah Moore, but there are a few. One of the worst landing spots for the speedy wideout is the Minnesota Vikings. Last year, the Vikings used their first-round pick to draft LSU standout WR and rookie phenom Justin Jefferson. Jefferson lit the NFL on fire in his first season, breaking the team record for receiving yards with 1,400, which was set by Randy Moss in 1998. With the always reliable Adam Thielen working from the slot, the Vikings are set in the wide receiver department for a while. There are better homes for a player like Moore.

Draft Range

Mid 1st-Mid 2nd

NFL Comparison

The best comparison for Elijah Moore to an NFL player is to wide receiver Steve Smith. At 5’9” and 185 lbs., the two are identical in weight and height. Neither wideout has the traditional NFL build and both are comfortable working from the slot. Just like Smith, Moore uses his quickness and explosive route-running to get separation. Both players have great hands and a knack for finding the open spot in a zone defense. It sets lofty expectations to compare a rookie to an NFL Hall of Fame inductee, but with a few character tweaks and the right coaching, Moore could develop into one of the best receivers in the rookie class.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 8.5 – Moore is not a true burner, but his speed will impress NFL scouts. Running just below a 4.4 in the 40-yard dash, he has some room for improvement.
Agility: 8.5 – With the ball in open space he is very agile. He seamlessly makes defenders miss with one cut or head fake.
Routes: 9.5 – He is a crisp route-runner and becoming famous for his hard one step cuts. Defenders have a hard time keeping with him off the line.
Hands: 8.5 – Moore has great hands and usually watches the ball all the way in. He is not a body-catcher and has a great ability catching poorly thrown passes.
Jumping: 7.0 – Because of his 5’9” stature, he might have a tough time with jump balls in the NFL. He will be better utilized in the flats and across the middle.
Size: 3


By: Russ Thomas @Rusty_Bill

Jevon Holland
39
Jevon Holland
Pick #39 – Panthers
Oregon, Junior, #2 S, #42 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 196 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
7.5
Agility
8
Man CVGE
7
Zone CVGE
8.5
TACKLES
6.5
GP
27
TACKLES
108
PD
10
INT
9
FF
0
FR
0

Jevon Holland has had an interesting come up, playing both defense and offense in high school, which has transitioned into playing multiple positions in college but on the defensive side. Holland came into Oregon as a four-star athlete but was clearly going to be best used on the defensive side. Now, Holland can play both slot-corner and safety, so NFL teams will have to figure out what they want to do exactly with Holland. This isn’t a knock on Holland being somewhat of an in-betweener but falling into the wrong team who can’t solidify his role can be an issue. Holland projects as a second-rounder and fits in with the more recent defensive prospects where they can be used in a few different areas.

Strengths

• Ballhawk
• Good instincts
• Covering WRs downfield
• Can play slot-corner and safety
• Physical
• Special Teams
• Quick burst to close down throws

Weaknesses

• Could struggle against larger WR/TE matchups
• Inconsistent tackler
• Smaller frame

The main weaknesses for Holland have more to deal with his size if he was to be at safety. He can certainly lay a hit but needs to add some strength to become a more consistent tackler. He is willing to tackle which is a plus but the smaller frame is a cause of concern, especially with injuries. However, Holland has shown the ability to play both slot-corner or safety at the net level. He has good instincts and a quick burst to be a game-changing playmaker. Holland’s frame doesn’t have him shying away from being physical either, which will certainly catch the eye of a few NFL teams.

College Production

2019 stats – 14 GP, 66 tackles, 0 sacks, 4 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 4 INT
Overall stats – 27 GP, 108 tackles, 0 sack, 10 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 9 INT

Holland was able to come into Oregon and make an immediate impact. Generally, Oregon is a school that brings in a lot of versatile athletes, and Holland had a role carved out right away. He played on special teams and also did work at both corner at safety. He had nine interceptions over the first two seasons and played 13 games as a freshman.

Best Landing Spot

Washington has really developed some young players and even struggling NFL players over recent years in the secondary. Holland projects to be a guy that could float around and be more scheme-driven, which would work well in Washington. Generally, I like playing time for someone right away but Holland could be more of a passing-down player, even though he has an upside when he plays up against the run.

Worst Landing Spot

There are a few teams that seemingly can’t find a lack of direction and that would bode poorly for Holland if they also struggle to find a direction with him. The Raiders have been a constant swing and miss team on young players.

Draft Range

2nd Round

NFL Comparison

Eric Weddle is someone who comes to mind for having multi-position attached coming out of college. Weddle also was someone who overcame his size issues, which was a knock against him when he came out of school. The physicality and short bust is similar, and the IQ is very high.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Reads routes and plays well at both positions.
Speed: 7.5 – Not elite speed but certainly above average.
Agility: 8 – Fluid when moving around the field but very quick to get to where he needs to be.
Man Coverage: 7 – Good against similar-sized players but will struggle against larger athletes
Zone Coverage: 8.5 – Excellent zone coverage player, especially as a safety..
Tackles:6.5 – Not shy, but needs to clean up his tackling and add some size to his frame


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Tyson Campbell
40
Tyson Campbell
Pick #40 – Broncos
Georgia, Junior, #3 CB, #44 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 205 lbs
IQ
7
Speed
8
Agility
8
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
7.5
TACKLES
8
GP
31
TACKLES
89
PD
10
INT
1
FF
1
FR
3

Tyson Campbell played his college ball at Georgia and actually played high school ball with Patrick Surtain, whose father was the head coach. He was a five-star recruit coming out of high school and a top-three ranked cornerback. He made 11 starts as a freshman and made an instant impact against SEC talent at wide receiver. Campbell is a larger cornerback, which is certainly in need at the NFL level but Campbell does have to clean up a few areas of his game. There could be some struggles early on but teams will look at the upside that he has and feel no risk in taking a shot.

Strengths

• Size For Defending Larger Receivers
• Good In Press Coverage
• Can Play Zone And Man
• Physical
• Above Average Tackler
• Solid Speed
• Fluid Hips

Weaknesses

• Awareness
• Lack Of College Production
• Ball Skills

There are a few areas that Campbell needs to improve on and the first is he lacks awareness at times to the point a wide receiver has made a move where it is too late for Campbell to recover. Some of his lack of production can be tied to his ball skills are below average. These are things that can be cleaned up at the next level and college production for corners isn’t something that concerns me if they lack. His size and speed are going to immediately make him one of the higher upside secondary players in the draft. Campbell has shown he can play both man and zone but his physicality allows him to press or play bump and run with great success.

College Production

2020 stats – 10 GP, 29 tackles, 0 sacks, 5 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 1 INT
Overall stats – 31 GP, 89 tackles, 1 sack, 10 PD, 1 FF, 3 FR, 1 INT

Being a starter in year one on a Georgia team is impressive and overall he played throughout the years with no injuries. The lack of production isn’t a huge deal and I would look more at how he held his own against what are now NFL talented wide receivers. Campbell had some mixed results but the upside is certainly there.

Best Landing Spot

Denver is a team that has some secondary priority and also a strong track record of solid cornerbacks in the NFL. He will play as an outside corner, and with no real scheme vulnerability, any system would work for him. Denver and the Los Angeles Chargers stand out as better teams to land at this moment.

Worst Landing Spot

There are many teams in disarray but Houston’s need for secondary players might have Campbell on their map. This is not ideal for a team that has really struggled to even run its own team. With all the negative chaos in Houston, any player will want to a

Draft Range

2nd/3rd Round

NFL Comparison

Campbell has an edge to his game to go with that size of his. Aqib Talib is someone who played outside corner solely and brought size and speed. Being versatile in defensive schemes was also something Talib was able to do, bringing the comparison to Campbell and what he brings to the table.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Lacks awareness at times but still has a good read on the game.
Speed: 8 – Very good speed and pairing with size makes him a potential lockdown threat.
Agility: 8 – Fluid hips and quick feet makes him tough to escape
Man Coverage: 8 – Love Campbell on man coverage, especially when pressing.
Zone Coverage: 7.5 – Showcased he understands zone coverage at Georgia.
Tackles: 8 – Tackling ability is well above average with his frame.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

ArDarius Washington
41
Ar’Darius Washington
Pick #41 – Lions
TCU, Junior, #3 S, #41 OVR
21 yrs | 5’8″ | 178 lbs
IQ
7.5
Speed
8.5
Agility
8
Man CVGE
6.5
Zone CVGE
7.5
TACKLES
6.5
GP
23
TACKLES
86
PD
6
INT
5
FF
0
FR
0

Ar’Darius Washington is one of the more exciting and flashy players when you watch the film from his college career. He is a smaller safety, which will be a concern, but his instincts and speed make him a real game-changer. While small, Washington plays like he is 6’2 and flies around the field. His ball-hawking skills are very solid and are someone who can change a game instantly. He will be best used in zone schemes and a team that will be able to develop him and have a plan for his best usage will likely dictate his NFL career. Washington played with Trevon Moehrig at TCU, who is the top-ranked safety in this draft. With NFL defenses beginning to feature more versatile players that can play different positions, like Derwin James and Tyrann Mathieu being able to line up in a few spots.

Strengths

• Speed
• IQ
• College Production
• Position Versatility
• Physicality
• Agile
• Ball Skills

Weaknesses

• Size
• Durability Questions At Next Level
• Getting Off Blocks
• Struggled With Play Action At Times

Watching Washington’s tape, this man absolutely flies around the field and makes plays. He is not the largest or tallest player but that doesn’t deter him from stepping up in run defense and making plays. He has a lot of fight in his heart. His IQ is strong in tracking the ball but did show some struggles against play-action passes where he was looking into the backfield too long and losing his vision on receivers. To be expected, he can struggle to get off blocks as his size is going to have limitations.

College Production

2020 stats – 9 GP, 37 tackles, 0 sacks, 4 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 0 INT
Overall stats – 23 GP, 86 tackles, 0 sack, 6 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 5 INT

Washington made an instant impact in his freshman year with five interceptions. He helped out with a pretty weak TCU run defense finding himself playing up at times and also as a last line of defense.

Best Landing Spot

Seattle makes a lot of sense for someone like Washington, where he can freely move around and use his speed. More traditional defensive teams would likely limit his role, which wouldn’t be ideal for growth either. Washington needs to find him a team that can adapt to what he brings to the table.

Worst Landing Spot

I have a feeling Jon Gruden is going to like Washington’s makeup with how he plays the game and being a big-time playmaker in the air. Washington needs to be on a team with other above average players around him, and that is simply not in Las Vegas at the moment.

Draft Range

2nd Round – 3rd Round

NFL Comparison

The physicality and skills are there to fly around the secondary, much like smaller safeties like Earl Thomas and Patrick Chung. Thomas had those ball skills and instincts to change a game, which Washington flashes. However, Washington will need to add some weight at the next level to truly mirror these names.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7.5 – Very instinctive and can read plays but does have another level to get to.
Speed: 8.5 – Absolutely flies round with elite speed.
Agility: 8 – Twitchy and shows ease in changing directions.
Man Coverage: 6.5 – Not asked to do a lot at TCU but wasn’t bad.
Zone Coverage: 7.5 – Good eyes in zone coverage and can break on passes.
Tackles:6.5 – Size limits him here but better than you’d think.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Stanford Cardinal
42
Walker Little
Pick #42 – Giants
Stanford, Junior, #8 OL, #45 OVR
21 yrs | 6’7″ | 320 lbs
IQ
8
PHYSICAL
6
MECHANICS
8
Pass Blk
8
Run Blk
5.5
Strength
6

Walker Little had a very interesting collegiate career. He came out of Episcopal High School in Bellaire, Texas, as the #9 recruit in the entire 2017 class. In his sophomore season, he put on a clinic as a left tackle when it came to pass blocking and protecting KJ Costello. There were some small holes in his game and a lack of good aggressive-play when run blocking, but Little looked poised to get even better in 2019. However, after just one game, he injured his knee and was out for the season. Little then chose to sit out of the 2020 season due to COVID concerns.

So, while Little remains a top offensive line prospect and a likely day-2 pick, this is really solely based on his sophomore season. There are reasons to both be worried and excited about this fact. Little could have gotten stronger and better at his position during the time off, or the knee injury could be a major concern for years to come.

Strengths

• Fantastic Pass Blocker
• Great Size for LT
• Good Hand Fighting
• Solid Footwork
• Mobile for Size

Walker Little has some fantastic traits that NFL GMs are looking for. The NFL is switching to a passing league, and Little demonstrated that he has the potential to be an elite pass blocker. In just his sophomore season, many deemed him one of the best pass blockers in the nation. He had a mix of good footwork, good hand fighting, and a feel for the game that you would expect from a senior, not a sophomore. He is also the ideal size for a left tackle sitting at 6’7 320. While not the most agile or mobile, he can pull and operate as a lead run blocker decently well, especially considering how big he is.

Weaknesses

• Injury History
• Missing Run Blocks
• Lacks Aggression
• Strength

Now, there is a lot of concern with Walker Little’s injury and the fact that he sat out in 2020. He has only played one game since 2019, and his whole draft profile is based on his 2018 sophomore campaign. The negatives that we saw that year could have improved by now, but there is no telling for sure. First of all, Little often missed run blocks. He needs to do a much better job of getting his hands on the defender quicker. This can also be argued to be a flaw in the passing game as sometimes he is late to engage, allowing the defender to pull a move on him. Alongside this complaint is the fact that Little needs to be more aggressive, especially in run blocking. Despite being a massive 6’7 Little played too timid as a tackle. Lastly, Little needed to get stronger between his sophomore season and the NFL. NFL edge rushers will be able to use power moves and bullrushes on him if this has not significantly improved during his time recovering and away from the game.

Best Landing Spot

Three teams come to mind when choosing a good landing spot for Little. The first two are the Arizona Cardinals and Atlanta Falcons. I love these two spots because of the scheme. Both these squads run vertical passing offenses that will allow Little to do what he does best, pass block. Despite the new offensive coordinator in Atalanta, I expect the team to stick to the power-blocking scheme with the vertical offense. The last spot I think could work for Little is Kansas City. The Chiefs have a great offensive line coach, and at the end of the day, they want to pass the ball and do it often. Little may not be agile enough for the Chiefs offense on day one, but I think he could develop into a franchise LT for Mahomes if drafted to Kansas City.

Worst Landing Spot

Teams that rely on zone-blocking and are run-heavy teams, like the Dolphins and Vikings, are probably not ideal fits for Walker Little. He is best suited for a team that wants to pass a significant majority of the time as that is his best attribute. Going to a team that wants to run the ball 30 times a game just does not make sense. Though, it is hard to find a bad spot for a good pass-blocking tackle. They are rare, and everyone could use one. As long as a team can develop Litte’s skill set, then they have a good reason to draft him.

Draft Range

Late 1st Round- Early 3rd Round

NFL Comparison

The first name the comes to mind is Alejandro Villanueva. Both Little and Villanueva thrive as pass blockers. Despite passing the ball a league-leading amount of times last year, Villanueva only gave up 3 sacks on the entire season, which is especially impressive considering how immobile Roethliserberger is. Similar to Villanueva, Little struggles in the run game; both could improve their blocking in space and be a bit more aggressive when lead blocking for a run. If Little can refine his pass blocking to eventually get to Villanueva’s level, then despite the run-blocking issues, he will have a long and successful NFL career.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Smart player, needs to learn to pass off rushers better
Physical: 6 – Not a special athlete, but great size
Mechanics: 8 – Very good pass blocking mechanics, but can be better
Pass Blocking: 8 – Great pass blocker from day one
Run Blocking: 5.5 – The weakest part of his game, better than average but needs to improve
Strength: 6 – Not as strong as one would want from an LT


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Alim McNeill
43
Alim McNeill
Pick #43 – 49ers
NC State, Junior, #2 IDL, #63 OVR
21 yrs | 6’2″ | 315 lbs
IQ
4.5
Athleticism
8
Mechanics
6
Pass Rush
5.5
Run Def
8
Strength
7.5
GP
32
TACKLES
77
SACKS
10
TFL
17.5
FF
2
FR
1

Alim McNeill came out of High School originally as a defensive edge prospect. He was rated a 3-4 star recruit and settled on NC State as his school of choice. However, with the Wolf Pack, he transitioned to becoming a defensive nose tackle for the team. He put on 40-pounds and began his journey to the interior of the defensive line.

Despite being new to the interior of the defensive line, McNeill demonstrated a great understanding of the position fairly quickly. He produced over his three years at NC State and has risen through the draft ranks as he has shown remarkable improvement with each year. He may be one of the more underrated prospects in the draft, as he has much more room to grow as he learns more about playing nose tackle. However, even at this stage of his defensive tackle career, he could be a good run-stopper for an NFL team.

Strengths

• Athletic For Size
• Strong
• Quick First Step
• Endurance to Play Every down
• Keeps Blockers At Distance to Read Plays

McNeill has a lot of positives going for him at the defensive tackle position. For one, he is the right size, strong, and surprisingly athletic, even after putting on the pounds required to play the position. This shows that McNeill is putting in the extra work and effort into his body to make sure that he can be the best player that he can be. This can also be seen by the fact he consistently finishes plays and rarely is off the field, even as a defensive tackle. When it comes to the position, his best trait is his explosive first step. He is very quick for a nose tackle/1-tech. He also does a masterful job at keep blockers at a distance so he can ready the play and running back.

Weaknesses

• New to Position
• Needs More Pass Rush Moves
• Quicker Reactions

A lot of weakness to McNeill’s game stem from being new to the position, which should be expected and maybe even seen as a positive for GMs, as they see these issues as easily fixable with time. The biggest one is the fact that he is not a great pass rusher. He needs to add more moves to help him get to the quarterback. However, he does have the athleticism and hands to develop these moves. Next is his reactions to plays. While he does separate from blockers to keep his eyes on the play, oftentimes, he is late at disengaging or reading what the play was. Other than these flaws, there is not a lot in McNeill’s tape from 2020 that sticks out as massive worries.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 11 , Tackles: 25, Sacks: 1, TFL: 4.5, FF: 1, FR: 1
Overall Stats – GP: 32, Tackles: 77, Sacks: 10, TFLs: 17.5, FF: 2, FR: 1

McNeill’s production was not a massive highlight for most, but he was very good. I think that 10 sacks from the nose tackle position over your first three years playing interior defensive line is very impressive. He had a solid amount of tackles and tackles for loss, and a lot of what McNeill did in the run game will not show up on the stat sheet. He ate blocks and created lanes for his linebackers to blow up plays on a regular basis.

Best Landing Spot

McNeill’s ideal landing spot is with a team that will not force him into a starting role on Day-1. He will also want to have a great coach to help him develop his set of skills. I believe that the Minnesota Vikings perfectly fit this bill. The Vikings signed Dalvin Tomlinson in free agency and will be pairing him next to Michael Pierce this season. Between two great veteran defensive tackles, you also have one of the best defensive line coaches in Andre Patterson to learn from. Unlike others, I believe that McNeill is athletic enough to learn the 3-Tech as well as the 1-Tech in a 4-3. With the right coaching, he has the build and athleticism to turn himself into a good pass rusher as well as a good run stopper.

Worst Landing Spot

McNeill needs good defensive line coaching, and a team that simply has not developed much production out of their interior defensive line is the Cowboys. The Cowboys have not really gotten any production from their line besides Demarcus Lawrence. While McNeill could help stop the bleeding on the ground for this Cowboys defense, I just do not see how the Cowboys could help or benefit McNeill’s career. This defense was historically bad last year, and none of the young players really saw a massive improvement in their game on the defensive side of the ball.

Draft Range

Early 2nd – Late 3rd

NFL Comparison

McNeill screams Dalvin Tomlinson to me. Both sit at around 6’2 320 pounds, and both are solid run stoppers who are surprisingly athletic. The difference in their games right now is Tomlinson has learned how to rush the passer and does a solid job at it. McNeill needs to add this part to his game, but he has the ability to do so. I believe that McNeill could easily become the player Dalvin Tomlinson is over the course of a couple of years. I would argue that McNeill is a bit more explosive and even has a higher ceiling than that. However, for now, they are very comparable players, with Tomlinson simply being a better version of what McNeill will offer his rookie year.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 5.5 – Needs a few more years under his belt as a DT
Athleticism: 8 – Very athletic for his size and love the explosive first-step, endurance is also a plus
Mechanics: 6 – Needs to work on his hand fighting and pass rush mechanics as well as disengaging blocks
Pass Rush: 5.5 – Weaker part of his game, but did produce 5 sacks his sophomore season
Run Defense: 8 – Great in rush defense, needs some minor improvements to become elite at it
Strength: 7.5 – Good strength, but needs to leverage that strength a bit more effectively


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Joseph Ossai
44
Joseph Ossai
Pick #44 – Cowboys
Texas, Junior, #7 EDGE, #46 OVR
21 yrs | 6’4″ | 253 lbs
IQ
7
Athleticism
9
Mechanics
7.5
Pass Rush
7.5
Run Def
6.5
Strength
7
GP
29
TACKLES
165
SACKS
11.5
TFL
30
FF
5
FR
1

There are a handful of athletic edge players in this draft, and Joseph Ossai is another one. He was born in Nigeria and largely his youth revolved around soccer. He began playing basketball and football in high school where he was a highly sought-after prospect. Most of the Texas colleges began throwing scholarships his way. He ended up being a four-star prospect, nearly going to A&M but ended up at Texas. Ossai moved into a starting role in his sophomore season, and then elevated his game Junior year, before announcing for the NFL Draft. Ossai is fast and has a knack for the ball, but does have some concerns for the next level. A landing spot is always important but Ossai really needs a team that can develop these types of talent, especially being somewhat lean for the position.

Strengths

• Explosive
• Aggressive & Finishes Plays
• Can Play In Space
• Playmaker
• Agile / Good Lateral Movement
• Long Arms
• Versatile
• Swim Move

Weaknesses

• Overpersues
• Slowed Down At First Block
• Needs To Let Plays Develop
• Lack Of Experience As Edge Rusher
• Run Defense

A lot of the ceiling for Ossai is driven by his high motor and drive to be a better player. He loves the sport and is someone who works hard on and off the field. His weaknesses are a lot about his inexperience and about him being an in-betweener. He played as a true edge rusher only last season, otherwise has been bouncing between an outside linebacker and an edge rusher. Ossai is quick and has great length making him a real threat to be a speed rusher. This speed can get him in trouble at times, as he will be only looking for the quarterback and can overpersue as well as let run plays get past him. Given a thinner frame, he also hit a wall against bigger blockers making it tougher for him to recover.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 9, TCK: 55, SACKS: 5.5, TFL: 15.5 FF: 3, FR: 1
Overall Stats – GP: 29, TCK: 165, SACKS: 11.5, TFL: 30 FF: 5, FR: 1

Ossai played seven games his freshman year as a sporadic third-down player and also on special teams. He jumped into a full-time gig his Sophomore year, and had two interceptions, one forced fumble, 13.5 tackles for loss, and five sacks. He followed up a stellar 2019 season with three forced fumbles, 15.5 tackles for loss, 5.5 sacks in just nine games. Ossai has shown versatility and a quick jump to production at Texas.

Best Landing Spot

Baltimore’s ability to get the best out of their defensive players continues to make any player in this draft a dream spot for their career. Ossai is a versatile player who can work in various schemes but should look as more of an edge rusher. Minnesota would also be another one given their track record, which would be a steal if he slipped to the second round.

Worst Landing Spot

Hard not to sound like a broken record, but I just don’t want to see another player who needs to have the correct structure around him to succeed and land with the Raiders. Players have come in and out of this organization and they don’t usually leave headed for big money and another job.

Draft Range

2nd Round

NFL Comparison

Given the speed and athleticism, and being somewhat of an in-betweener himself, Haason Reddick is someone that comes to mind. Reddick broke out in 2020 with 11 sacks and also is someone who has a similar nag for creating turnovers.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Inexperience shows at time when attacking gaps and developing run plays.
Athleticism: 9 – Extremely quick and has solid speed in space.
Mechanics: 7.5 – Still raw but showing improvement, especially with his hands.
Pass Rush: 7.5 – The raw pass rush is there because of his speed, but needs to add more to arsenal.
Run Defense: 6.5 – Needs to read run plays better and not overpersue.
Strength: 7 – Good strength but has a smaller frame and less weight compared to some lineman.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Samuel Cosmi
45
Samuel Cosmi
Pick #45 – Jaguars
Texas, R-Junior, #10 OL, OVR #49
20 yrs | 6’7″ | 309 lbs
IQ
9
Physical
9
Mechanics
4.5
Pass Blk
7
Run Blk
7.5
Strength
6

Coming out of Atascocita High School, Cosmi had the exact opposite experience as other powerhouse offensive tackles in this draft, such as Penei Sewell. He was ranked by 247Sports Composite as the 104th ranked OT before arriving at Texas. That is quite an accomplishment starting with such a low ranking and turning into a potential first-round draft pick. He didn’t initially have the weight required to play at a huge football school like Texas, as he weighed around 260 pounds as a freshman. That weight could not have supported his 6-foot-7 frame playing the tackle position in the Big 12. He opted to redshirt his freshman year and committed to putting on a substantial amount of weight. Cosmi still has some room to add a few pounds, and some mechanics issues to fix, but they are not enough to shy away from drafting him as a player with a potential Pro-Bowler ceiling.

Strengths

• Experience
• Long Arms and Height
• Athleticism
• Wrestling Background

Cosmi has high-level collegiate experience playing both right and left tackle for a total of 35 games for the Longhorns, showing enough versatility and athleticism to have success at both positions. This is a huge advantage for him as he can fit well into many different teams’ rosters and needs. His length is going to cause a lot of issues for smaller defensive ends. This is a huge advantage for Cosmi, and added with his athleticism, could make him a strong starting tackle option with a Pro-Bowl ceiling. What stands out the most about Samuel is his obvious athleticism, which has helped him overcome certain technical flaws. He is quick laterally and knows how to use the leverage from his wrestling background to help complement his size.

Weaknesses

• Weight
• Mechanics
• High Pads

Cosmi could stand to put on some weight to his 6-foot-7 frame. If he put on another 15-20 pounds, he would have really solid size for the NFL. As it stands now, he is right around 309 pounds, which is respectable, but on the lower-end of what most tackles in the 2021 draft weigh. Some of the best tackles in the NFL are between 315-325 pounds, but are also a bit shorter, so the weight is more proportionate to their frame. There are also times when it seems Cosmi loses control of a block well before a play has developed, sometimes due to his grip strength and hand placement. His size and athleticism have allowed him to cover some of those technical flaws but he will need to improve those substantially. The last weakness, the occasional high pads, is much less of a concern, given his excellent ability to use leverage. His wrestling background makes this a marginal long-term concern.

College Production

Cosmi redshirted his freshman year to put on weight and gain experience. He put on roughly 40 pounds in one year and then didn’t look back, playing both left and right tackle for the Longhorns, and succeeding in both positions. The Texas product started 34 total games (21 at Left Tackle and 14 at Right Tackle) for the Longhorns and that experience is certainly a huge aspect of his upside.

Through eight games in 2020, Cosmi only allowed one sack, one quarterback hit, and one tackle for loss. He took a step up from his already strong production level in 2019 when he had a pressure rate in the 90th percentile. His pass-block grade in ‘19 consequently was at 86.

Best Landing Spot

Any team that utilizes zone blocking schemes fits Cosmi, and his athleticism and size very well. Examples of teams that would work would be Green Bay and Minnesota. There are plenty of others, including where I believe the best fit would be, which is San Francisco.

The Niners need to realize that there is such little difference between an OT that would be available at 12 versus one available at 44. At 12, they need to move on from Garoppolo and go with Mac Jones. The second round would allow them to potentially snag a player like Samuel Cosmi who fits their need at LT, but is also a fluid lineman who can play RT as well. This would address their needs and also gives Cosmi a great place to utilize his athletic ability in an offense that employs a significant amount of zone blocking. Assuming Williams leaves San Francisco, this is the best situation for both the Niners and Cosmi.

Worst Landing Spot

Due to Cosmi’s athleticism, ability to play RT and LT, and his length, I don’t know that there is a worst landing spot for him. Specifically, I think there are some spots better than others. The ones that may not be quite as good of a fit would be ones that marginalize the things he does well, like getting into the second level. In addition, any team that tries to shift him to the guard position (not likely) would also constitute a “worst landing spot” for him.

Draft Range

2nd Round

NFL Comparison

When attempting to draw comparisons for Cosmi specifically, I want to look at height and weight. Lane Johnson was 6-foot-6 and just over 300 pounds coming out of college, which is near identical to Cosmi’s current physique. In addition, Johnson used his athleticism to get to the second level quickly and hide any deficiencies he had at the time. Ironically, Johnson also played in the Big 12 and also had some experience at Left tackle and Right tackle. This is the type of career I could see from Cosmi, not that they are mirror images, but they certainly bear some resemblance.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9 – This grade is given mostly based on his ability to understand and play multiple positions. This can help Cosmi nail down his role within multiple offensive schemes. His understanding of angles is also of great importance to help mitigate any mechanics issues he will have to eventually work out in the NFL.
Physical: 9 – He has exceptional athleticism given his size, lateral quickness, and ability to get to the second level.
Mechanics: 4.5 – Hand placement and grip are major concerns. He had substantial success
in college by using his athletic prowess and not relying at all on mechanics. Getting his hands on the EDGE will be of great importance at the next level where every defensive player is an exceptional athlete.
Pass Blocking: 7 – Cosmi maintained an 86 pass block grade in the 2020 season, followed by another excellent season in 2020

Run Blocking: 7.5 – Cosmi’s run blocking, especially his ability to get to the second level is another strong attribute that he carries
Strength: 6 – The strength is there, but this number is rather an indicator of how often we see it versus its actual existence.


Amon-Ra St. Brown
46
Amon-Ra St. Brown
Pick #46 – Patriots
USC, Senior, #11 WR, #63 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 194 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
6
Agility
8
Speed
7
Jumping
7
Size
7
GP
30
REC
178
REC YDS
2,270
TD
17
YDS/REC
12.5

Amon-St Brown came out of Mater Dei High School in Southern California as the number one wide receiver-recruit in the 2018 class. He undoubtedly was a 5-star prospect and committed to USC. Over the course of his 2019-season, his draft stock reached a peaked as he demonstrated incredible hands, good speed, and great play-making ability.

However, in 2020 Amon-Ra St. Brown seemingly took a step back. He lacked concentration in many games leading to dropped passes, lazy routes, and subpar run blocking. While his draft stock was also affected by an elite WR class, he has dropped off from a sure Day-1 pick to a middling day-2 NFL WR prospect. St. Brown has great natural WR-talent, but there are parts of his game that simply seem underwhelming and are worrying to NFL scouts.

Strengths

• Natural Hands
• Ball Tracking
• Good Acceleration
• Balanced Through Routes and Carrying the Ball
• High-Pointing
• Good Slot Ability

Amon-Ra St. Brown has a ridiculous amount of natural talent. He can ball track, catch, and high-point with the best of collegiate wide receiver prospects. There is little arguing that he simply is a natural at catching the football. He also possesses pretty eye-catch acceleration and balance. This allows him some lee-way in his routes and allows him to put together good yards after the catch. His best plays came out of the slot where the CB was not pressing him. He operates well from this position which could be a massive plus for some franchises.

Weaknesses

• Top-Speed is Average
• Blocking Was Mediocre
• Seemingly Took Plays Off
• Unimpressive Release
• Struggles Against Press

Amon-Ra St. Brown is not the perfect prospect. His top speed is not bad, but he is not a burner at the NFL level. He also lacked any kind of aggressiveness in the blocking-game during his 2020 season. This lead to him being often pushed back, causing screenplays to get blown up. On top of this, there were some drop issues and bad routes run that you just did not see in the 2019 tape. However, with all that said, the biggest concern has to be his release. There was nothing impressive about Amon-Ra St. Brown’s release against cornerbacks, and in fact, he was extremely poor against strong press coverage. This is worrying as, while his routes were good in college, they were not good enough to make up for poor releases at the NFL level. This makes me think that St. Brown is exclusively a slot WR, as he simply does not get off the ball well enough to be a #1 for an NFL franchise.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 6, REC: 41, REC YDS: 478, TDs: 7, YDS/REC: 11.7
Overall stats – GP: 30, REC: 178, REC YDS: 2,270, TDs: 17, YDS/REC: 12.5

St. Brown’s production was solid in college but not very comparable to the top WRs in this class that had other-worldly numbers. A lot of St. Brown’s best work came in short and intermediate routes out of the slot that led to solid gain after solid gain. In 2019 he did have some fantastic plays that were huge for USC.

Best Landing Spot

One of the better landing spots for St. Brown could be the Kansas City Chiefs. This is because the Chiefs already have a number one WR in Tyreek Hill. Andy Reid knows how to scheme open his WRs, and St. Brown would not always be tasked on the outside. Reid would work him into the slot and play around St. Brown’s poor release. I also believe playing with Patrick Mahomes has to be any WRs’ dream as he is simply one of the most talented QBs to ever touch a football.

Worst Landing Spot

The worst spot for St. Brown could be the Detroit Lions. Not only do the Lions have zero other receiving threats, making St. Brown a pivotal part of the offense, but Jared Goff is not the greatest situation for St. Brown at QB. When St. Brown did have big plays, he did not have incredible separation and needed very confident passes to get him the ball, something Goff will lack. I do not suspect that St. Brown would get the luxury of playing out of the Slot in Detroit due to the fact that he would be their best wide receiving option.

Draft Range

Late First-Early Third

NFL Comparison

Amon-Ra St. Brown reminds me a lot of JuJu-Smith Schuster. These are both extremely talented wide receivers who have natural talent and solid ability. However, due to shortcomings in their route running, releasing, and top-speed, neither are cutout to be true #1 NFL wide receivers. Both can be ridiculously productive and good players in the slot, with someone else taking the what of the #1 CB in the X position. They also are both bigger slot wide receivers, making their talents even more unique out of this position.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 7 – Good acceleration, decent speed
Agility: 8 – Balanced and smooth while route running and with the ball
Routes: 6 – Decent routes, needs to significantly improve the release
Hands: 9 – Extremely solid hands and catching ability
Jumping: 7 – Can high-point the ball well but will not jump out of the building
Size: 7 – 6’1 and a good build at 190+ pounds


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Landon Dickerson
47
Landon Dickerson
Pick #47 – Chargers
Alabama, R-Senior, #9 OL, #46 OVR
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 325 lbs
IQ
10
PHYSICAL
4
MECHANICS
8.5
Pass Blk
8.5
Run Blk
6.5
Strength
8.5

Landon Dickerson has had an interesting collegiate path. He committed to Flordia State out of High Scool as a four-star recruit. However, after injury troubles, he transferred to Alabama as an R-Junior. There, he made a name for himself as one of the smartest and best IOL prospects coming into the NFL Draft.

He is one of those players that gets rave reviews from anyone you ask due to his work ethic, football IQ, and leadership. However, he could not stay healthy at Alabama either as he had a freak incident in the SEC Championship game that essentially ended his collegiate career. Dickerson is working back and seems on track for a full recovery heading into the 2021 NFL season.

Strengths

• Fantastic Hand Fighting
• Big Body & Strong IOL
• Pass Blocking is Outstanding
• Solid Footwork
• Extreme Football IQ

One of Landon Dickerson’s best traits is his football IQ. You can see this by how he analyzed defensive fronts as the center for the Alabama team. However, you can also see how smart he is with his hand fighting, passing blockers off, and the way he diagnosis pass rush moves. Due to his extreme strength and size as an IOL, he is a rock in pass pro and would slide in perfectly as a guard or center for any team that needs extra pass protection. His footwork and mechanics in pass block and run blocking are developed and ready for the NFL level.

Weaknesses

• ACL Injury History
• Use Leverage Better
• Agility/Speed is Lacking for IOL

The biggest worry for Landon Dickerson has to be his injury history. Only his R-junior season was he able to stay healthy from the start to the end of the season. Every other year of college, he faced major injuries to his knee or ankle, including his final season. When it comes to his actual plays, the only big worry is his lack of speed and agility as an IOL. He is not made for a zone-blocking scheme as he is simply not a great athlete. One minor issue is using leverage better as, despite his strength and size, he sometimes gets knocked off his anchor foot in pass-pro.

Best Landing Spot

I believe that Landon Dickerson could be a fantastic addition to the Pittsburgh Steelers. The Steelers threw the ball more than any team last year, and I do not believe that this will change much in 2021. This means that Dickerson could be utilized as a starter from day one and utilized in his best role as a pass blocker. However, I also think that Dickerson could do well in the run-scheme that is present in Pittsburgh.

Worst Landing Spot

It is hard to find a bad spot for Dickerson, as he is extraordinarily talented and smart. However, the Chicago Bears run a zone-blocking scheme just as much as anyone in the NFL. I think that Matt Nagy thrives off of having agile blockers, and that simply is not Dickerson’s game. I also have not seen much development out of the Bears’ offensive line in recent years, a bit of a red flag for prospects looking to land somewhere where they can develop.

Draft Range

Late 1st Round- Late 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

Tow players come to mind when I watch Landon Dickerson play. When he was a guard, I saw a lot of things that reminded me of Brandon Brooks. Both are massive interior linemen who rely on strength to get a lot of the work done. When Dickerson played center, there was quite a bit of Rodney Hudson in him. Hudson is a veteran who is smart and an amazing pass blocker. Simply put, that is what you are getting out of Dickerson. Similar to Hudson, he is a high-football IQ, a big body, and a superb pass blocker who can be good at power run blocking. While both these players are some of the best at their position, Dickerson could be on the path to that ceiling if he improves more in the NFL and stays healthy.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 10 – One of the smartest linemen in the draft, learned center quickly and excelled at it
Physical: 4 – Not very athletic, below-average agility and speed for a G/C
Mechanics: 8.5 – Good mechanics and some small tweaks could turn this into a 10 quickly
Pass Blocking: 8.5 – Great pass blocker from day one on the interior of the line
Run Blocking: 6.5 – Smart run blocker who will be good in power run schemes
Strength: 8.5 – Very strong guard and would be one of the stronger centers in the league


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

LSU
48
Jabril Cox
Pick #48 – Raiders
LSU, Junior, #5 LB, #51 OVR
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 231 lbs
IQ
9
Athleticism
8.5
Pass Cover
9
Tackling
8
Run Def
7
Strength
7
GP
10
TACKLES
58
SACKS
1
TFL
6.5
FF
0
INT
3

After playing three years at one of the country’s most successful FCS programs, Jabril Cox transferred to LSU. During his time as a defensive leader for the North Dakota State Bison, Cox helped NDSU win three NCAA Division I Championships. Cox continued to play at an exceptional level during his single season playing in Baton Rouge. Cox finished third on the Tigers in tackles, led LSU in solo tackles, plus tied for third in interceptions. The interceptions are a stat that has caught the attention of NFL scouts. Jabril Cox has solid potential as a mid-second round selection with a huge upside if he improves as a run defender.

Strengths

• Outstanding range for a linebacker
• Able to shed blockers
• Changes direction quickly
• Outstanding at visually optimal pursuit angles
• Explosive off the line

Weaknesses

• Could add weight to better defend against the run
• Tendency to overthink play sets
• Fails to read misdirection plays

Cox’s speed is not one of his primary strengths, but he still ranks average or above. His biggest attribute may be an explosive first step. He has outstanding quickness and changes direction on a dime. Cox doesn’t waste time with blockers, plus quickly makes up ground from sideline to sideline. His total college resume includes nine interceptions as a linebacker, supporting his strength as a having a nose for the ball. Cox could add ten or more pounds to his frame without sacrificing his quickness. He is a dedicated student of the game, so this could help him improve his ability to read trap blocking and misdirection plays.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 10, TACKLES: 58, SACKS: 1, TFL: 6.5, FF: 0, INT: 3

Despite being one of the strongest programs in the FCS division of college football, there quite the accent placed on performance by NFL scouts. However, the excellent play of Jabril Cox at NDSU proved his unmistakably outstanding talent. Even though he played a single season at LSU, the skills that earned him multiple All-American honors for the Bison was obvious. Cox has a nose for the ball, and 37 solo tackles is impressive. In addition, Cox has tremendous pass coverage sense for a linebacker.

Best Landing Spot

The Las Vegas Raiders need immediate help on defense. A priority area is in the secondary. However, the Raiders’ defense would also improve dramatically with a fast linebacker who excels in pass coverage. Jabril Cox would fit that mold. Cox’s speed and aggressive play style would also be an excellent fit for the Dallas Cowboys.

Worst Landing Spot

The Miami Dolphins sit two spots below the Raiders in round-two at pick 50 overall. If Cox’s name hasn’t already been called, it might be hard for Miami to pass up one of the best defensive players left on the big board. However, a lot of pressure would be placed on Cox in Miami to defend the run. Until he shows an ability to add some weight without forfeiting any speed or quickness, it could restrict the speed of his maturity at the NFL level.

Draft Range

Late 2nd-3rd Round

Cox is landing on some mock drafts mid-second round. There are a handful of teams, beginning with the Dallas Cowboys at overall pick number 44, who have a need at linebacker. If Cox makes it down to pick number 48, there is a strong probability he could be wearing the Raiders’ silver and black in 2021.

NFL Comparison

Jabril Cox is nearly three-inches taller but has the same body build and weight as Carolina Panthers linebacker Tahir Whitehead. Whitehead has five NFL interceptions and is above average in pass coverage. Like Cox, Whitehead benefited from adding weight. During his career since being selected in the fifth round by Detroit, Whitehead has added roughly 10 pounds.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9 – Cox is a player with a nose for the ball. His football IQ is extraordinary. He is rarely fooled in pass coverage, and the nine interceptions as a college linebacker indicate an above average understanding of pass routes.
Athleticism: 8.5 – Average speed is the only downside of Cox’s overall athleticism. Cox has outstanding balance and a tremendous ability to change direction.
Pass Coverage: 9 – Cox doesn’t have quite enough speed to warrant a shift to strong safety, but his outstanding ball pursuit skills and quickness make him an outstanding pass coverage linebacker.
Tackling: 8 – Outstanding pursuit angles all but negate Cox’s slightly lighter weight as an NFL linebacker. Cox uses an explosive first burst to stand up ball carriers at the point of contact. Cox’s 37 solo tackles during his senior season at LSU solidify his tackling technique.
Run Defense: 7 – Cox’s quick burst at the snap allows him to initiate contact in the opponent’s backfield. However, there may be some questions about his strength against power run blocking.
Strength: 7 – Cox has adequate strength. Adding additional bulk without sacrificing his quickness and speed would raise his value as an NFL outside linebacker.


By: Sam Sherfin @samshefrin

NDSU
49
Dillon Radunz
Pick #49 – Cardinals
NDSU, R-Senior, #11 OL, #50 OVR
23 yrs | 6’6″ | 304 lbs
IQ
7
PHYSICAL
7.5
MECHANICS
8
Pass Blk
6.5
Run Blk
8.5
Strength
6

Dillion Radunz came out of Becker, Minnesota, and was originally recruited as a defensive edge. Radunz’s only FBS offer was Missouri, but he decided to go down and play for North Dakota State. There, he transitioned to the offensive tackle position and put on some much-needed weight. Over the course of his career at NDSU, he got better and better with time. Similar to his offensive teammate, Trey Lance, Radunz put on a great showing during the 2019 season to lift his draft stock into the Day-2 range for 2020.

Radunz was only able to play one game during the 2020 season, but he looked solid, and nothing really changed about his draft stock. However, at the Senior Bowl, scouts really got a look at how good Radunz could be against top-level competition. Although he struggled his first day, he got better and better and soon was highlighted as maybe the best linemen out there.

Strengths

• Great Lower Body Strength
• Athletic
• Good Run Blocker
• Gets to Second Level
• Punch/Hand Fighting is Solid
• Guard/Tackle Flexibility

Radunz’s best ability is his athleticism for being 6’6. He is able to get to the second level, lead block, and do everything you need to have a successful screen and run-game to his side of the ball. He also does a good job of keeping his block engaged and knowing when to move on in the run and pass game. When in pass protection, his two best assets are his punch and lower-body strength. He does a good job of establishing himself, which allows him to avoid being pushed back.

Weaknesses

• Smaller Frame For Tackle
• Not As Quick Laterally as You Want
• Upper Body Strength Could Be Better
• Not a True NFL Left Tackle

While tall, Radunz is not very heavy. He is only around 300 pounds which is light for a tackle. He lacks the strength that you would want to see in the upper body from a true left tackle for your offensive line. On top of this, he isn’t particularly quick with his lateral movement. This jumped at me on tape, and I have slight concerns about how he could handle elite speed rushers off the edge. Of course, you have to note that he did not play against the best of the best while at NDSU.

Best Landing Spot

I love the fitting of the San Francisco 49ers and Kyle Shanahan’s zone running scheme with Dillion Radunz. While the tackle spots are taken care of, Radunz would be a massive improvement over the current projected right guard, Justin Skule. Radunz would help out the run game even more and be more than solid enough in pass protection. I also think that the G/T flexibility would huge for the 49ers as there is not a solid option behind Trent Williams or Mike McGlinchey. If either went down, Radunz could slide right in at RT and be effective.

Worst Landing Spot

The one place that seems like a bad fit for Radunz’s skillset is the Pittsburgh Steelers. First of all, the Steelers need a left tackle, and Radunz simply is not a true left tackle. Secondly, the Steelers are a team that is going to pass and pass a lot. This minimizes Radunz’s best skill set, in my opinion, which is the run and screen game. Radunz really needs to go somewhere where he can slide in at RT or guard and also somewhere that has good coaching. It was obvious in the Senior Bowl that he can improve and improve fast with the right instruction.

Draft Range

2nd – 3rd Round

NFL Comparison

When I watch Dillon Radunz, I see a ton of Vikings’ right tackle Brian O’Neil. Both of these players were smaller, athletic left tackles in college who project more as right tackles in the NFL. Brian O’Neil has done a fabulous job transitioning, with his best contributions coming in the run game. However, he holds his own in the passing game and has strengthened his upper body. I think that you can expect a very similar player in Radunz if you draft him to be the right tackle and give him the proper coaching.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7 – Seems to learn quick, in-game IQ is above-average for a linemen
Physical: 7.5 – Very athletic, but lacks lateral quickness and a bit of agility that you want to see
Mechanics: 8 – Very solid mechanics, one of the only places to improve is his pass pro footwork
Pass Blocking: 6.5 – Pass blocking was solid in college, but I worry about speed rushers at the next level
Run Blocking: 8.5 – Very solid run-blocking tackle, would be perfect as a G/RT for a zone scheme
Strength: 6 – Lower body strength is above average, but upper-body strength needs some work


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Michigan
50
Jalen Mayfield
Pick #50 – Dolphins
Michigan, R-Sophmore, #13 OL, OVR #59
20 yrs | 6’5″ | 319 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
7
Mechanics
5.5
Pass Blk
7.5
Run Blk
8
Strength
7.5

Jalen Mayfield has all the upside and versatility that any team sitting at the end of the first round could want. In this tackle-heavy draft, some lucky team will be able to snag him and get great value, when he would’ve gotten taken much sooner in prior years. He’s probably the third or fourth-best tackle in the draft and that should entice some team to pull the trigger at the end of the first round. After a short but successful career at Michigan, where he started merely 15 games, Mayfield will look to move closer and closer to his very high ceiling in the NFL.

Strengths

• Bend
• Potential
• Versatility
• Strength

Mayfield is a great “bender” with above-average flexibility in the knees. If he can learn to stay on balance a bit more, then he will have a really great foundation to build upon in the NFL. His potential is constantly on full display and he was right about to connect all of the dots in 2020, but his season was cut short after just two games by a high ankle sprain. Nonetheless, it’s safe to say that the strides he has made show an offensive lineman with great upside. From a versatility standpoint, Mayfield can play left tackle and right tackle. It’s even possible that he could move to guard at some point in his professional career and, quite frankly, I could see it. He certainly has the body and the foundation for the position, and his strengths could make a transition to OG fairly seamless. Jalen possesses a lot of strength as well, oftentimes unbothered by strong edges.

Weaknesses

• Injuries
• Athleticism
• Lateral Quickness
• Hands and Mechanics

Some injuries have bugged Mayfield during his tenure at Michigan. It isn’t a huge red flag, but it does pose some questions about longevity and is worth keeping an eye on. He had a high-ankle sprain in the 2020 season, so he didn’t have the chance to show, in totality, his development from his promising 2019 season. High ankle sprains scare me a bit, but despite that, it would be hard to justify not at least taking a late-first round flier on Mayfield. His athleticism does not jump off the page either. The most recent 40-time he had clocked in at 5.31 seconds, which was at his pro day. It doesn’t really hurt his stock, but doesn’t help it either. He’s a fair enough athlete, but there is a tendency at times to be a bit off-balanced and he lacks the lateral quickness and overall athleticism necessary to recover against top-end edges.

College Production

Mayfield is an interesting case. While he has only had 15 collegiate starts, he was also the only tackle during the duration of the 2019 season to truly contain superstar defensive end, Chase Young. When he was lined up in front of Young, he was able to really put all of the glimpses of brilliance together that we had seen. Despite getting beat a time or two, he was still viewed as a raw prospect and that put him on the map. He has only improved since. Mayfield also had the opportunity to line up against Yetur Gross-Matos and many other talented ends, so while his experience in the quantity of games started is somewhat small, the quality of his competition was excellent.

Best Landing Spot

Mayfield is another tackle that would fit well within any zone run blocking schemes. Much like Cosmi, he excels in getting to that next level. What he lacks in athleticism, he makes up in quick timing and discipline. If he (or Cosmi) somehow fell to the 49ers in the second round, that would be an absolute steal for them. Another potential fit could be the Chiefs towards the end of the first round. They need to make sure they are protecting QB1 as much as humanly possible, and he fits well within that offense, so it could be worth it for them.

Worst Landing Spot

It’s hard to imagine a worst case scenario for a guy who has been talked about playing several different positions, including left tackle, right tackle, and guard. Based off of his potential fluidity on the line, it’s safe to say he bypasses any worst landing spots, as he is still a very moldable player.

Draft Range

Late 1st – Early 3rd

Mayfield could very well find himself as the third or fourth tackle drafted. Much like Cosmi, he has experience at left tackle and right tackle, which makes him an invaluable asset to teams. The flexibility he offers could get him drafted ahead of other guys who are locked into one tackle position. As mentioned earlier, there have even been talks of him getting moved to guard. That fluidity is a significant strength that could place Mayfield as high as the low-20’s and as low as 3rd. However, it’s hard to imagine a team not taking a stab at him by the end of the first round.

NFL Comparison

He has a bit of Marcus Cannon in him. I think the ability to shift from right to left tackle and vice versa is an underrated talent, and this for sure is reminiscent of what Marcus Cannon experienced in New England a few years back when its whole line seemed to go down. Mayfield may put on another 5-10 pounds during his time in the NFL, so they will be similar size, and he even has the chance to be more versatile with a higher overall career ceiling.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Mayfield is a very smart player who has a superb knowledge of blocking angles.
Physical: 7 – He certainly is not going to shock you with exceptional athleticism, but he is nimble and fairly light on his feet, often showing excellent footwork.
Mechanics: 5.5 – Mayfield’s hands are one of his biggest weaknesses, and although he doesn’t lack the technical knowledge, sometimes his hands still fail him. His incredible “inside arm” often mitigates this weakness, but it may be a bit more exposed in the NFL.
Pass Blocking: 7.5 – Mayfield really can anchor well in the passing game and understands how to use leverage and his knowledge of blocking angles to protect the pocket.
Run Blocking: 8 – Jalen can run block very well, coming off the line quickly and moving his defender. He can also get to the second level, but not as fast as a comparable player like Samuel Cosmi can.
Strength: 7.5 – He has good size at 6-foot-5 and 326 pounds and can move defenders in the run game. Sometimes bull rushers can knock him off his line though.


Clemson
51
Jackson Carman
Pick #51 – Washington
Clemson, Junior, #12 OL, OVR #51
21 yrs | 6’5″ | 345 lbs
IQ
6
Physical
8
Mechanics
6
Pass Blk
6
Run Blk
9
Strength
8

Jackson Carman arrived on the Clemson campus as a five-star recruit and the second-highest rated tackle from his recruiting class. Carman is a massive presence on the offensive line and a devastating run blocker. During the 2019 season, he was entrusted with protecting projected number-one overall 2021 draft pick Trevor Lawrence’s blindside. While he is most noted as an outstanding run blocker, Carman did an excellent job in pass protection as well. His sheer size, blended with tremendous athleticism, fits perfectly into the mold of a solid NFL offensive lineman.

Strengths

• Size and strength
• Outstanding athleticism
• Overpowering run blocker
• Played extremely well against top-level competition
• Skills and agility to shift to offensive guard if necessary

Weaknesses

• Below average footwork on pass protection
• Problems recognizing speed blitz coming off the edge
• Some questions about personal character and consistency

Carman’s run blocking ability is documented across Clemson Tigers film. He is an athletic offensive lineman with sufficient technique in the passing game. This combination of strength, size and athleticism give teams an option of moving him inside to guard. There were instances of slow first step allowing edge rushers to gain an advantage. Questions about his personal character will topics that teams will inquire about during the combine.

College Production

2018 – As a true freshman, Carman played in 13 games. He made over 200 snaps as part of Clemson’s offensive line rotation.

2019 – During his sophomore season, Carman stated all 15 Tigers’ games. He was instrumental in Clemson’s outstanding rushing attack and controlled Ohio State Buckeyes’ standout Chase Young in the college football semifinal game.

2020 – During Carman’s true junior season, he again helped anchor a strong Tigers’ offensive line. Clemson returned to the BCS playoffs where Carman had a solid game despite the Tigers’ loss to Alabama. Carman earned second-team All-American honors and was also named to the second-team in the ACC. Earlier this year he announced he was entering the 2021 NFL Draft as a junior.

Best Landing Spot

Washington is beginning to put together a strong core of skill-position players. They also had one of the better defenses in football in 2020. There are questions all across the Washington Football Team’s offensive line. Carman’s potential ability to shift down a spot to guard makes him of huge interest to Washington. Washington may opt to add another piece on defense with the 51st pick, but Carman would be an excellent fit if they choose to bolster their offensive line.

Worst Landing Spot

The Tampa Bay Buccaneers eliminated both Green Bay and Kansas City from the playoffs. Both had injury problems at offensive tackle. As one of the top-rated run-blocking tackles, with the potential to shift to guard, Carman will certainly draw the interest of both the Packers and the Chiefs. However, he may not be the best fit for team chemistry for either of these playoff teams.

Draft Range

Early 2nd – Early 3rd

There is a sense that Carman will fall down into the mid-second round. The Washington Football Team rests at pick number 51 overall. However, both Miami and Jacksonville have three picks each ahead of Washington’s second pick in the draft. Both the Dolphins and Jaguars are highly focused on at least one of the top-10 available offensive tackles.

NFL Comparison

Carman’s blocking style and physical dominance has been compared to Mitch Morse. Morse was a second-round pick by the Kansas Chiefs in 2015. With a similar level of versatility to shift to guard, there are some who think the Chiefs may have an interest in Carman.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6 – Performs admirably in basic downhill run blocking plays. However, there are instances where Carman misreads the edge blitz and is unable to recover.
Physical: 8 – Carman is a massive physical presence. He produces power off the line and has enough quickness to shift down to guard
Mechanics: 6 – Overall mechanics are solid, especially in first contact on run blocking assignments. He will need to read defenses better and improve his consistency in pass protection.
Pass Blocking: 6 – Carman provides adequate protection during passing plays at Clemson, but his pass blocking technique is unpolished. He misreads initial defensive packages, so NFL defensive coordinators may press his inability to get out ahead of an edge blitz.
Run Blocking: 9 – Carman’s massive size and strength, blended with excellent agility, make him a prototypical NFL run blocker. He might even be better as an offensive guard.
Strength: 8 – Carman has excellent upper body strength with powerful leg drive. Carman has a good sense of balance and stability.


By: Sam Sherfin @samshefrin

Dyami Brown
52
Dyami Brown
Pick #53 – Bears
UNC, Senior, #9 WR, #53 OVR
21 yrs | 6’0″ | 185 lbs
Hands
5.5
Routes
5.5
Agility
7
Speed
9
Jumping
6
Size
6.5
GP
33
REC
123
REC YDS
2,306
TD
21
YDS/REC
18.7

Dyami Brown came out of West Mecklenburg high school as a 4-star athlete and settled on the University of North Carolina when deciding where to play his college ball. Brown really lifted his draft stock in the 2019 and 2020 seasons. He averaged over 20 yards a reception in both of these seasons and routinely took the top off the defense. Due to his vertical threat, this opened up other routes, and Brown became a weapon that required a ton of game-planning for, from opposing defenses.

Strengths

• Vertical Separation
• Solid Acceleration
• Ball Tracking is Solid
• Speed is a Massive Threat
• Aggressive Blocks/Not Scared of Contact

Dyami Brown’s best attribute is undoubtedly the vertical separation. It only takes Brown a small double move to create separation with his elite acceleration and speed. There were several plays that Brown ended up with 5+ yards of separation in less than 15 yards after his double move. To go along with this vertical separation, he is a great ball tracker and has no issue catching over his shoulder. His speed is such a threat that it allows him easy diggs and comeback catches and a regular basis. He also is an aggressive blocker and shows little to no fear when catching the ball over the middle of the field during posts and slants.

Weaknesses

• Struggled With Drops
• Press Coverage Can be Issue
• Routes Need to Be Tighter
• Not a massive route tree

The main issues with Dyami Brown were his drops and lack of crisp and versatile routes. Dyami Brown had a couple of games where it just seemed like he could not secure a catch underneath; luckily, he caught all of his deep balls. This appears to be partially a mechanics issue and somewhat a mental issue. Then, nothing is awe-inspiring about his routes. Some of them are a little too rounded out, and there was nothing eye-catching there. It mainly was speed and acceleration that did the work for his production. He also did not run a bunch of unique routes, which could be concerning for teams with a hefty route tree.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 11, REC: 55, REC YDS: 1,034, TDs: 8, YDS/REC: 20.0
Overall stats – GP: 32, REC: 123, REC YDS: 2,306, TDs: 21, YDS/REC: 18.7

Brown’s college production was absolutely fantastic. In a run-heavy offense like UNC, where they relied on backs Michael Carter and Javonta Williams for a majority of the offense, he was able to provide that big-play ability in the passing game to balance out the offense. Every single play he was a threat to beat his man and score a touchdown on a deep ball, and oftentimes that threat led him to achieve easy first down catches with comeback routes.

Best Landing Spot

My favorite landing spot for Dyami Brown is the Arizona Cardinals. While Brown is somewhat similar to Christian Kirk, I think that is what Kliff Kingsbury is looking for. Dyami Brown is a massive speed threat that has the ability to be unleashed in a vertical offense like the Arizona Cardinals. He also would get to learn under two of the best wide receivers of our generation in DeAndre Hopkins and AJ Green.

Worst Landing Spot

While I do not hate this landing spot, I just do not see it as a massive fit. The New York Jets will most likely be bringing over the Kyle Shanahan offense with the coaching changes that the franchise has made. In this west coast offense, Brown’s limited route tree and vertical threat would not be used nearly as much. On top of this, if, for some reason, the team does not draft Zach Wilson and sticks with Sam Darnold, then Brown’s talents could really be wasted with a QB that simply cannot take advantage of Brown’s best assets.

Draft Range

Mid 2nd – Early 4th

NFL Comparison

I see a lot of Diontae Johnson when I watch Dyami Brown. Both of these two have elite vertical separation, and both deal with drops from time-to-time. Now the biggest difference currently between these two players is the fact that Johnson has added to his route tree from college; something Brown will need to do is he wants to see similar success. However, looking at their tapes in college, the two players as prospects are eerily similar. I would love to take a chance on Brown late into day-two, we have seen it pay off with Diontae Johnson and DK Metcalf, who both had similar pros and cons when it came to limited route trees, drops, but superb vertical separation.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9 – Fantastic top-end speed and mid-route acceleration
Agility: 7 – Good balance and acceleration, needs to be tighter in routes
Routes: 5.5 – Good Vertical Separation, but routes are nothing special & has limited route tree
Hands: 5.5 – Hands are great down the field but has had drop issues
Jumping: 6 – Good jumping skills and ball tracking
Size: 6.5 – Nice size at 6’0 with a good frame


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Notre Dame
53
Liam Eichenberg
Pick #53 – Titans
NDSU, R-Senior, #14 OL, #60 OVR
23 yrs | 6’6″ | 305 lbs
IQ
8.5
PHYSICAL
6
MECHANICS
7.5
Pass Blk
7.5
Run Blk
7
Strength
8

Liam Eichenberg is coming from what has been an offensive line factory over the last few years. He is a big power lineman who has potential to be an above average starting tackle. Eichenberg was a top-100 player in the class of 2016 and chose Notre Dame over other prominent schools. He is a smart player who uses his hands well and also can move defenders well in run blocking. There is also a high motor for him, which is something you want at the position. He is also durable and can play both tackle positions. This class has turned out fairly deep for offensive lineman and while Eichenberg isn’t listed as a top-top ranked lineman, he is going to be a solid value in the 2nd/3rd round.

Strengths

• Strength
• IQ & Awareness
• Squares Up
• Good Hand Placement
• Good Run Blocker
• Leverage
• High Motor

Weaknesses

• Footwork
• Can Be Beat By Speed Rushers

Eichenberg doesn’t quite have the footwork and fluidity, otherwise, he would skyrocket up the rankings. He can get beat by speed rushers but his length will help him at times, especially because he tends to get his hands right every time. He moves players off the line and would work well in a more power style attack. Eichenberg is a smart lineman and shows it with his awareness on the field. He isn’t one to panic and recovers well.

College Production

With Notre Dame churning out stud lineman over the years, Eichenberg finally got to start in 2018. He struggled early on in his career but quickly found his groove. In 2019 he was a part of a terrific offensive line and he took it to another level in 2020. Eichenberg held his own against other premier college pass-rushers.

Best Landing Spot

Pittsburgh and Indianapolis stand out as spots where he could land and also fit in well with what they do. Both are in need of some offensive line help, but in Indy he might be asked to start at left tackle, which would put some pressure on him early. Pittsburgh could slide him in at either side. Both have teams that also will be competitive which is a plus.

Worst Landing Spot

You can take your pick from a few organizations that are competing with each other for the worst run. Houston would be a dreadful place to land for any one, especially with no future in sight.

Draft Range

2nd Round

NFL Comparison

Anthony Castonzo is someone Eichenberg could be replacing and he would slide into an important spot that he leaves behind. Castonzo is a big tackle who relied on his strength, smarts, and hands to make up for his lack of footwork. Eichenberg fits those similar traits. Castonzo wasn’t viewed as a top-three option in the league but he was stable each season.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8.5 – Great awareness of pass rushes.
Physical: 6 – Footwork is not fluid and isn’t someone who will move out well in space.
Mechanics: 7.5 – Hands are the best part of his game, but footwork mechanics need work.
Pass Blocking: 7.5 – Can struggle with speed but has good length and hands.
Run Blocking: 7 – Better power run blocker than zone.
Strength: 8 – Strong and has a physical edge to his game.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Penn State
54
Pat Freiermuth
Pick #54 – Colts
Penn State, Junior, #2 TE, #48 OVR
22 yrs | 6’5″ | 260 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
8
Agility
7.5
Speed
7.5
Blocking
6.5
Size
8.5
GP
29
REC
92
REC YDS
1,185
TD
16
YDS/REC
12.9

There are a few tight ends in this draft, one being Kyle Pitts who is the stud athlete. Brevin Jordan is another name who has some after the catch ability. It is pretty unanimous that Freiermuth is the number-two tight end in this class. Penn State has been spitting out a lot of excellent skill position players over the years and the Big 10 especially has been churning out tight ends. He is coming off a shortened season where he had surgery on his shoulder. This will be something teams look at. Freiermuth has a high ceiling for a receiving tight end, he has good speed, size, and hands. His route-running ability is terrific and while he doesn’t have elite speed, he moves very well and is fluid.

Strengths

• Strong Hands
• Route Running
• Breaks Down Zone Coverage
• Catch In Traffic
• Willing Blocker
• Physical
• College Production

Weaknesses

• 2020 Injury
• Average Blocking
• Non-Elite Open Field Speed

The continued trend with tight ends and their weaknesses is their blocking can be a bit pedestrian. There is potential Freiremuth can be an above-average blocker still given he has added size and shows a willingness to block. Freiremuth has strong hands and will make in-traffic catches. He also goes and gets the ball away from his body. He is versatile and showcases great fluidity when running routes. Freiremuth also shows the IQ to move around in space and break down zone coverage.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 4, REC: 23, REC YDS: 310, TD: 1, YDS/REC: 13.5
Overall stats – GP: 29, REC: 92, REC YDS: 1,185, TD: 16, YDS/REC: 12.9

Freiremuth jumped right into the offense with eight touchdowns in his freshman year. He followed it up with seven touchdowns and over 500 yards. 2020 was off to a strong start with 310 yards in four games but a shoulder injury ended his season. 15 touchdowns over 25 games in his freshman and sophomore year is very impressive.

Best Landing Spot

If Freiremuth falls into the second round, there is a deeper spot he could go with the Los Angeles Chargers. Getting in with a good young quarterback and other options around him would be a plus early on in his career. He could also land in Indy and I would like his upside more in year 2 compared to year 1. Baltimore and New Orleans are also in the mix for great spots.

Worst Landing Spot

There have been quite a few mocks that take him to the Jets or Jaguars. These aren’t the worst places in the world but I would want to see Freiremuth more involved in an established offense already.

Draft Range

Early – Mid 1st

NFL Comparison

Pat Freiremuth is within that mold of Zach Ertz and Hunter Henry. Neither are overly fast but still have above average athleticism and size that make them a mismatch. Both also excel in their route-running ability. However, Freiremuth has a bit more grit to his game and I also like his hands more. This is where I would pull Kyle Rudolph into the picture where he has had that good frame and knows how to get his hands to the ball, even in traffic.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 7.5 – Above average speed for his size, not elite speed.
Agility: 7.5 – Good feet, makes a quick turn.
Routes: 8 – Fluid route-runner, can line up multiple positions.
Hands: 9 – Terrific hands and focus, great ability on 50/50 balls.
Blocking: 6.5 – Decent blocker, upside is there
Size: 8.5 – Plus height and strong frame makes him a tough mismatch.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Javonte Williams
55
Javonte Williams
Pick #55 – Steelers
UNC, Junior, #2 RB, #29 OVR
21 yrs | 5’10” | 220 lbs
VISION
8.5
AGILITY
9.5
SPEED
7
BALL SECURITY
10
HANDS
7.5
BLOCKING
8.5
GP
34
RUSH ATT
366
RUS YDS
2,297
RUSH TD
29
REC
50

Williams came out of Wallace Rose Hill High School in North Carolina and was a 3-star recruit. While he was not highly touted, UNC took a chance on him and stayed close to home. Javonte Williams was a bit of an unknown coming into this 2020 season unless you were deep into college scouting. Williams entered the 2020 season behind Michael Carter, his UNC teammate, on both the depth chart and on the 2021 Draft big boards. However, after an outstanding 2020 campaign and some national recognition, Williams has skyrocketed up those same draft boards.

Strengths

• Great Acceleration
• Good Vision
• Elusive
• Breaks 1st Tackle
• Physical
• Receiving Threat
• Good Blocker
• Ball Security

Williams’ strengths were present in both 2019 and 2020; however, this previous season, Williams refined these skills to produce unreal numbers for North Carolina. Williams has elite cutting and vision ability at the college level. His ability to accelerate and cut is up there with the best coming out of college. Then, once Williams got going, rarely did you ever see the first or second tackler bring him down. Williams runs with a beautiful balance of physicality and elusiveness. Williams only had one fumble during his collegiate career and was exceptional in the passing game, showing off how great his hands are. On top of all this, Williams was physical and played big as a pass blocker.

Weaknesses

• Top-end Speed
• Split Carries in College

The only concerns for Williams are his top-end speed and the fact that he was not a 200+ carry guy. Williams will most likely run around a 4.6 forty time; however, that is plenty fast to pull off big plays at the next level. While Williams never tallied an insane amount of carries due to the split backfield, he has no injury history and never looked gassed. He may not be as big of a workhorse as Derrick Henry, but I have little doubt that he can be the guy for a team.

College Production

2020 stats – 11 GP, 157 RUSH ATT, 1,140 RUSH YD, 19 RUSH TD, 25 REC, 305 REC YD, 3 REC TD
Overall stats – 34 GP, 366 RUSH ATT, 2,297 RUSH YD, 29 RUSH TD, 50 REC, 539 REC YD, 4 REC TD

Javonte Williams pulled off an incredible 2020 season where he averaged over 7 yards per carry and 19 touchdowns. The man simply could not be taken down, and it was often the third or fourth tackler that was even able to begin to slow him down. You mix this with the fact that his vision allowed him to get to the second level before anyone even laid a hand on him at times, and that is how you average over 7 YPC. Williams had great explosiveness, and his 19 rushing touchdowns are insane when you consider that he split carries.

Best Landing Spot

Williams could easily see himself slip to the Pittsburgh Steelers in the second round. The team is bringing back Roethlisberger for another go at winning a Super Bowl, and with the window being now, I think that Williams makes a ton of sense. Williams could be the featured back that Mike Tomlin loves, and he would be far more efficient than anyone currently on the roster. His ability to pass block and catch out of the backfield fits the pass-heavy offense well. While the Steelers’ line is not as good as it once was, I believe that with some offseason moves, it can get back to being elite. Williams is nothing like Le’Veon Bell; however, I could see a Bell-like season when it comes to pure numbers with Williams in Pittsburgh.

Worst Landing Spot

I think that you can argue the Arizona Cardinals are the worst spot for any running back. Kliff Kingsbury has an ineptness when it comes to the running game that is matched by no other offensive coach in the league. Despite having two solid RBs in Drake and Edmonds, Kingsbury was able to get nothing out of them. I think that Williams would struggle here, and his development would be stunted by this anti-RB offensive scheme that is currently being run. Kingsbury would not be able to utilize Williams and his playmaking ability like he failed to utilize Drake’s in 2020.

Draft Range

1st- 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

I think of two guys when I see Williams: Kareem Hunt and Dalvin Cook. Williams is a great one-cut back who can accelerate and play both physically and elusively. Both of these RBs can block and work in the passing game, similar to Williams. Another point of comparison is how he is able to utilize his vision and speed between the tackles or on the outside, like Dalvin Cook. Now, this is a hefty comparison as many consider Cook to be one of the best all-around backs in the NFL, but that is how good and how special I think Williams can be.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 8.5 – Great vision, it can be better, but it is already very good
Agility: 9.5 – Elusive, great cuts, and knows how to stay on his feet even after getting hit
Speed: 7 – Accelerates very fast, but not wonderful top-end speed, closer to average
Ball Security: 10 – No fumble worries at all at UNC
Hands: 7.5 – Very good pass catcher coming out of college
Blocking: 8.5 – The mechanics and footwork can improve, but he plays big and consistently gets the job done in pass-protection


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Najee Harris
56
Najee Harris
Pick #56 – Seahawks
Alabama, Senior, #1 RB, #28 OVR
22 yrs | 6’2″ | 229 lbs
VISION
8
AGILITY
6
SPEED
7
BALL SECURITY
9
HANDS
7
BLOCKING
8
GP
51
RUSH ATT
638
RUS YDS
3,843
RUSH TD
46
REC
80

While he likely won’t be a top-10 pick in the likes of Adrian Peterson, Ezekiel Elliott, or Saquon Barkley, Najee Harris will undoubtedly compete with Travis Etienne as the first running back taken off the board in this year’s draft. When you watch him play, it’s hard not to fall in love with his game, as few running backs possess the combined physical and technical abilities that Harris brings to the gridiron. He uses all 6’ 2’’ and 229 pounds of his frame with aggressiveness, shedding through arm tackles with ease, routinely initiating contact and gaining extra yards. His ability to lower his center of gravity and drive with his legs make him ideal for goal-line and short-yardage situations. He shows incredible burst exploding through a hole, smooth route running and hands, and a willingness and above-average ability to be aggressive in pass protection, also making him an ideal candidate for a three-down role. Perhaps the most impressive characteristic of Harris, however, is his intangible knack to routinely make the best decision running the ball. He seems to have the patience to wait for and find a hole, but never dances around in the backfield for too long. Playing running back is something that just appears natural to Najee Harris. This knack for the game, along with his physical gifts, should make him a wonderful player in the NFL.

Strengths

• Shedding arm tackles
• Short-yardage, driving for extra yardage
• Patience
• Acceleration, burst to hit a hole
• Superb instincts running out of backfield
• Overall receiving ability

Weaknesses

• Top-end speed
• Elusiveness

Because we have been spoiled by the likes of superhumans such as Saquon Barkley, we must find aspects of Najee Harris’ game to criticize, if there are any. The one that sticks out is his lack of game-breaking speed. While he demonstrates incredible burst and acceleration hitting the hole, and will probably have a solid 40-yard-dash time, you won’t often see him hitting the afterburners and leaving everybody in the dust, a missing characteristic that is likely the reason there is even a chance he slips past the first round. One potential unforeseen circumstance of his lack of top-end speed in-game could be a diminished ability to beat defenders to the edge and around the corner, something that will become more difficult as his level of competition gets faster across the board in the NFL. Another aspect of his game that could become a liability is his ability to make defenders miss. While he certainly has a highlight reel of cut-backs, spins, and hurdles in college, more often than not he doesn’t pull it off without some sort of contact, which slows down how quickly he can start moving downfield after the missed tackle. In the NFL, against increased strength and speed, there is the potential that he has a much tougher time making defenders miss, which could severely diminish his effectiveness.

College Production

2020 stats – 13 GP, 251 RUSH ATT, 1466 RUSH YD, 26 RUSH TD, 43 REC, 425 REC YD, 4 REC TD
Overall stats – 51 GP, 638 RUSH ATT, 3843 RUSH YD, 46 RUSH TD, 80 REC, 781 REC YD, 11 REC TD

Harris put an all-time stamp in the Alabama record books, which is saying quite a bit given the history of the Crimson Tide program. His 2020 season alone was remarkable, amassing nearly 2000 all-purpose yards and hitting 30 total touchdowns. Overall, Harris set the all-time record at Alabama for career rushing touchdowns at 46, all-purpose touchdowns at 57, career rushing yards at 3843, and was second in all-purpose yards at 4624. Dating back to high school (in which he eclipsed 2000 rushing yards in three straight seasons), Harris has topped 10,000 rushing yards in his last six seasons of football. While that’s a lot of mileage, he looks stronger than ever at just 22 years old.

Best Landing Spot

Miami or Seattle. First, Miami. The Dolphins could benefit from putting as much play-making ability around Tua Tagovailoa as possible, something that Harris could provide. In addition, Harris could bring not only stability to the position but the ability to take on a heavy workload, which Miami showed a willingness to do last season. In the seven games that second-year running back, Myles Gaskin was the clear starter and was healthy, his 17 carries per game and 4.7 targets per game accounted for 71-percent of the carries and 66-percent of the running back targets over that stretch. However, Gaskin, who weighs just a shade over 200 pounds, was unable to stay healthy down the stretch. Harris could step in and take on that work-load immediately. He’s an exceptional runner, an above-average receiver, and is superb at blocking out of the backfield. If not in Miami, Seattle would also be a good fit. With over twenty players departing in free agency, Chris Carson and Carlos Hyde among them, Seattle desperately needs to replace 2020 production in this year’s draft with rookie contracts. Despite Pete Carroll publicly committing to “getting back to running the ball” in 2021, resigning Chris Carson or Carlos Hyde would be ill-advised for their payroll. Enter Najee Harris. He could immediately step in and take on the workhorse role that Seattle’s offense desperately needs without the salary cap hit that Carson or Hyde would require with a new contract.

Worst Landing Spot

The Houston Texans. Is there any team less desirable a destination right now than the Houston Texans? Deshaun Watson has likely played his last snap for the Texans and they’re likely headed into a rebuilding mode as they search for a new franchise quarterback. This means he’d spend his rookie contract playing for an uncompetitive team. In addition, coming from a well-run, winning organization such as Alabama, and stepping into the dysfunction in the Texans’ organization at the moment would not do well for his morale. Apart from the big-picture look of it, Houston finished last season with one of the worst offensive lines in football and he’d spend at least a year competing with both David Johnson and Duke Johnson for playing time, who are both under contract in 2021.

Draft Range

Mid 1st- Early 2nd Round

NFL Comparison

Jonathan Taylor. Taylor, who played at the University of Wisconsin, was in a similar situation coming out of college last year that Najee Harris finds himself in now. He was a potential first rounder, but fell to the second. While Harris is a tad bigger than Taylor, their playing styles are very similar as well and many of their labeled strengths as prospects are identical: Power, fighting through contact, short-yardage situations, burst, patience, elite vision, and above-average hands. Taylor’s 4.41 40-yard-dash helped improve his draft-day status, and landing in Indianapolis behind one of the league’s best offensive lines made him the breakout candidate he ultimately fulfilled. For Harris, a solid set of measurables at the combine or pro-day, coupled with the right destination, could lead to an even higher draft pick than Taylor and a replication of the 200-plus carry, 1000-plus yard, 10-plus touchdown rookie season that Taylor enjoyed.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 8
Agility: 6
Speed: 7
Ball Security: 9
Hands: 7
Blocking: 8


By: Zachary Boeder @ZacharyBoeder

Ohio State
57
Justin Hilliard
Pick #57 – Rams
Ohio State, RS-Senior, #6 LB, #61 OVR
22 yrs | 6’1″ | 231 lbs
IQ
6.5
Athleticism
8
Pass Cover
7
Tackling
7.5
Run Def
7
Strength
6.5
GP
36
TACKLES
84
SACKS
0
TFL
9
FF
1
INT
2

There are a handful of defensive prospects out of Ohio State and Justin Hilliard is one of them. He has been projected to go all over, going from the 2nd round to being a late-round pick. Much like the Buckeyes offensive side, the defensive side tends to rotate a lot of players. He was in and out as an outside linebacker Hilliard has shown the ability to be an outside linebacker but the track record is a bit thin. He is athletic and gets up the field quickly but is a bit undersized and has had some durability issues. Hillard is going to potentially be used as a jack-of-all-trades-type defensive player and also play on special teams.

Strengths

• Shoots The Gap
• Tackling
• High Motor
• Can Cover Tight Ends
• Shows Ability In Coverage

Weaknesses

• Needs To Take Better Angles
• Injury History
• Limited College Snaps

The inexperience does show at times given that he struggles in his route to the ball at times. He played limited snaps at Ohio State and had an injury history. He is also somewhat undersized. Hilliard plays with a high motor and is aggressive when shooting the gap. While he has a smaller frame he does have good length making him a decent tackler. It is a limited sample but he showed some potential in pass coverage, which would help give him the chance for more snaps.

College Production

2020 Stats – GP: 6, TCK: 33, SACK: 0, TFL: 5, FF: 1, INT: 1
Overall Stats – GP: 36, TCK: 84, SACK: 0, TFL: 9, FF: 1, INT: 2

It was an up and down career at Ohio State, where injuries and a deep roster hurt his playing time. He did open up more in 2020 and was able to showcase himself for the draft a bit. He flashed a lot of upside.

Best Landing Spot

The high motor and ability to play special teams really feels like a New England Patriots player. The history of getting the best out of these types of defensive players is rich in New England and under this staff. Given his play under Urban Meyer, Hillard to Jacksonville would give the two some familiarity.

Worst Landing Spot

Any team expecting Hilliard to make an instant impact could be a bad landing spot because if the draft capital is late, he is an easy name to be thrown back out making it tough for him to find footing in his league.

Draft Range

3rd Round

NFL Comparison

Justin Hilliard is going to find himself drafted unlike his comparison Wesley Woodyard. Hilliard has a ton of upside and can be a starting linebacker in the NFL. He is going to take some years to grow into a role and Woodyard took a similar route. Both are a bit on the smaller size but play with an aggressiveness and fly into gaps.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6.5 – Good instincts but needs work in coverage awareness.
Athleticism: 8 – Excellent athleticism, gets to point B very quickly.
Pass Coverage: 7 – Small sample but has a lot of upside in pass coverage.
Tackling: 7.5 – Not much will escape him, good mechanics and radius.
Run Defense: 7 – Attacks run gaps with a presence, above average run defender.
Strength: 6.5 – Could add some bulk to his frame.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Washington
58
Elijah Molden
Pick #58 – Ravens
Georgia, Junior, #7 CB, #39 OVR
22 yrs | 5’10” | 190 lbs
IQ
8.5
Speed
7
Agility
7.5
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
7.5
TACKLES
6
GP
36
TACKLES
153
PD
19
INT
5
FF
4
FR
2

Elijah Molden is coming off a productive college career at Washington and stands out as one of the top slot-corners in this class. He is the son of Alex Molden, who played corner for the Saints back in the 90s. Coming in at 5’10, he is on the smaller size but will ideally fit as an interior corner. Molden is a willing tackler and is smart in run defense but is a big time playmaker. Molden excels in reading plays and passes, and has a history of jumping routes. Molden isn’t a household name in this draft but is going to be a Day 2 name that could jump into a starting role right off the bat. Any team with an opening at slot-corner will have Molden on their wish list. Someone will be getting a steal.

Strengths

• Instincts
• Quick Burst
• Angles And Route To Ball
• Fluid Hips
• Ball Skills

Weaknesses

• Smaller frame makes him an easier block.
• Size limits his tackling ability.
• Non-Elite Speed

For what his position is, the smaller frame will work well at the next level. However, it does create some limitations for him getting off blocks and securing tackles. He does play with a lot of energy and is not afraid to tackle. The best aspect of his game is his instincts, where Molden constantly is making the right reads and rarely gets beat on a route. He doesn’t have elite speed but fluid hips and a quick burst that helps him get to the ball. Once he does he has the ball skills to make game-changing plays.

College Production

2020 stats – 4 GP, 26 tackles, 0 sacks, 1 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 1 INT
Overall stats – 36 GP, 153 tackles, 0 sack, 19 PD, 4 FF, 2 FR, 5 INT

Molden could have come out after his breakout junior year, where he had four interceptions and also forced three fumbles. He returned his Senior year in what turned out to be a shortened year, where he had 26 tackles and an interception in four games.

Best Landing Spot

Landing in a playoff team that needs a slot-corner would be a plus. Baltimore and Buffalo are two spots where he could slide right in and also have help around him when it comes to personnel and coaching. Washington would be another fit. These teams have recognized talent and know how to get the best out of them. Molden fits that interior corner position well.

Worst Landing Spot

While Molden could potentially play safety in the NFL, I see him best used as an interior corner. He would also be better suited to fall into a secondary that doesn’t put much pressure on him with struggling outside corners or just an overall bad defense. The Raiders and Texans are quickly coming to mind.

Draft Range

2nd/3rd Round

NFL Comparison

Molden is a mesh of Tyrann Mathieu and Chris Harris. He can play up in the slot and deeper as a safety like Mathieu and has potential like Harris while in the slot. Unlike Harris though, he would struggle on the outside.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8.5 – One of the smartest corners in the class.
Speed: 7 – Good not great speed.
Agility: 7.5 – Quick feet and burst to make up for non-elite speed.
Man Coverage: 8 – Stays hip and hip with his man, good ball skills.
Zone Coverage: 7.5 – Good IQ and burst to play in zone.
Tackles: 6 – Effort and willingness to tackle is there, but limited.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

UCF
59
Richie Grant
Pick #59 – Browns
UCF, R-Senior, #4 S, #56 OVR
23 yrs | 6’0″ | 195 lbs
IQ
6
Speed
7
Agility
7
Man CVGE
9
Zone CVGE
6
TACKLES
8
GP
46
TACKLES
290
PD
17
INT
10
FF
5
FR
4

Each year, there are a handful of NFL Draft picks, players overlooked until the second-round, who turn out to be immediate contributors to their new team. Former University of Central Florida safety Richie Grant could be that type of player. Grant is a high-energy safety that tackles well in the open field. He has long arms and an athletic body, which helped Grant break up 16 passes and snag 10 interceptions during his three seasons for the Knights. Grant is a ball hawk with a high-intensity motor. During his last season at UCF, Grant only had four missed tackles recorded on his stat page. Richie Grant will also turn 24 late in his rookie season, so he has the maturity to handle the challenges as a professional football player immediately.

Strengths

• Position versatility
• Changes direction quickly
• Long arms
• Very athletic
• Aggressive sideline-to-sideline pursuit

Weaknesses

• Occasionally misreads coverage responsibilities
• Limited blitzing experience
• Overly aggressive pursuit of tackling angles

Versatility is a noticeable strength. Grant was primarily used as a free safety at UCF. However, he shifted across to box safety, covered the slot, and even moved down to cornerback on occasion, His versatility will be a huge appeal to teams that employ multiple coverage schemes. He makes up ground quickly, plus has the athleticism to handle tight ends in coverage. Grant is an aggressive tackler that purses well from sideline-to-sideline. Occasionally, his aggressiveness caused him to overshoot angles and miss tackles. Grant would benefit from improvement in this area. While he has excellent athleticism, Grant only has limited experience as a blitzing free safety. He has a tremendous work ethic, which will help Grant push for a starting role quickly.

College Production

2020 stats – 9 GP, 72 tackles, 1 sacks, 5 PD, 2 FF, 2 FR, 3 INT
Overall stats – 46 GP, 290 tackles, 1 sack, 17 PD, 5 FF, 4 FR, 10 INT

Grant’s statistics across three seasons as a starter for UCF were impressive. He recorded 16 total pass breakups, plus intercepted 10 passes. Grant also forced five fumbles and recovered four. During 2020, Grant had three picks to go along with 72 tackles. Two of his tackles were in the opponent’s backfield. While Grant didn’t blitz often, he recorded 3½ sacks on his blitz opportunities. One of his most impressive stat lines was only missing on four tackles during his final season. Grant was a semifinalist for the Jim Thorpe Award and the Bednarik Award in 2020. He was a member of the All-American Athletic Conference first-team three consecutive seasons. Grant led UCF in tackles with 109 during his sophomore season and finished second in 2019 recording 78 tackles. Grant left UCF tied for third-most interceptions in a season with six during his sophomore season.

Best Landing Spot

Andrew Sendejo was a weak link in the Cleveland Browns’ secondary at times during 2020. He is a 10-year NFL veteran who got beat deep. Grant could begin as a nickel option for the Browns, but quickly take over as the number one free safety. Grant’s athleticism would be a perfect fit with cornerbacks Denzel Ward and Terrance Mitchell, plus be an excellent match with the Browns’ physical strong safety Ronnie Harrison Jr.

Worst Landing Spot

The Buffalo Bills needs list includes immediate attention be paid to improving the offensive line. They are also reportedly focused on an outside linebacker and cornerback. Buffalo does have a direct focus on improving their pass defense. Micah Hyde is the Bills’ current free safety. Hyde is 30-years-old. However, Grant may be forced into a starting role too early if he were to be drafted by a heavily regarded Super Bowl contender.

Draft Range

2nd Round – 3rd Round

Richie Grant brings a high level of athleticism to the safety position. However, he may not have enough dominating film evidence to warrant a spot in the first-round. As soon as the big board flips over to the second-round, Grant’s name will appear on any team with a need to bolster their secondary. Pittsburgh could benefit from adding help in the secondary, but they may target a bigger need at linebacker first. AFC North Division rival Cleveland could prove the landing spot for Grant with the Browns’ 59th overall pick. If Grant’s stock were to rise, he would also be an excellent fit with the Dallas Cowboys at overall pick number 44.

NFL Comparison

Grant’s size and aggressive playing style resemble that of New Orleans Saints’ free safety Marcus Williams. They both have excellent tackling skills and are deemed high-energy players with excellent sideline-to-sideline pursuit. Ironically, even though Williams has three years of NFL experience, they are both 24-years-old. Williams was a second-round selection by New Orleans in the 2017 NFL Draft.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 7.5 – Very instinctive and can read plays but does have another level to get to.
Speed: 8.5 – Absolutely flies round with elite speed.
Agility: 8 – Twitchy and shows ease in changing directions.
Man Coverage: 6.5 – Not asked to do a lot at TCU but wasn’t bad.
Zone Coverage: 7.5 – Good eyes in zone coverage and can break on passes.
Tackles:6.5 – Size limits him here but better than you’d think.


By: Sam Sherfin @samshefrin

Pitt
60
Paris Ford
Pick #60 – Saints
Pittsburgh, Junior, #5 S, #55 OVR
22 yrs | 6’0″ | 190 lbs
IQ
6
Speed
6.5
Agility
7.5
Man CVGE
5
Zone CVGE
6
TACKLES
6.5
GP
23
TACKLES
136
PD
10
INT
6
FF
3
FR
0

Born in Pittsburgh and staying put to play at Pitt, Paris Ford channels a lot of the blue-collar surroundings into his play. He came out of high school as a 4-star recruit and did pass on offers from big schools like Alabama and Notre Dame. Ford is aggressive and he is going to play as physical as possible. He constantly is looking for contact. Ford can also handle his own while in coverage but does need improvement at the next level. He has a lot of versatility but will need to improve in a few key areas to really establish himself as a top safety. Landing on a team that can develop him will be key for his success at the next level.

Strengths

• Physical
• Run Defender
• Ball Skills
• Versatile
• Recovers Well

Weaknesses

• Improper Angles
• Missed Tackles
• Frame
• Inconsistent Went Playing Deep

Ford can be a bit Jekyll and Hyde where he looks like a very athletic safety who can fly around and other times he can look a bit lost in coverage and misreads his routes to the ball. These inconsistencies can be cleaned up a bit and will need to be if he wants to be a full-time player. His Pro Day was also considered to be a major disappointment, which could lead to a drop.

College Production

2019 stats – 7 GP, 41 tackles, 0 sacks, 1 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 3 INT
Overall stats – 23 GP, 136 tackles, 0 sack, 10 PD, 3 FF, 0 FR, 6 INT

It took some time for Ford to become a full-time player at Pitt. In 2019 he finally put together a full season and had a terrific year. This was the season that put him on the map. He did come back and play in 2020 but shortened his year after opting out.

Best Landing Spot

Ford staying put in Pittsburgh despite offers from top schools would ultimately make the Steelers a great place to land but moving past the local roots he fits into a lot of the mixed coverages they bring. With a good mix of zone and man coverage, allowing the safeties to move around a bit, Ford would play well here.

Worst Landing Spot

Any team that forces Ford to play as a deep safety without any strong development in the area will not be thrilled with Ford in their system. Luckily for teams in need of a safety, not many project to be a bad fit for Ford.

Draft Range

3rd Round

NFL Comparison

We continue to see safeties have more mobility pre-snap than ever before. Budda Baker is an easy comparison given the size and willingness to fly around and make hits. Baker is a playmaker and has been better in coverage but had issues with that and his size coming out of college.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6 – Needs to work on reading routes and letting plays develop
Speed: 6.5 – Lacks top-end speed
Agility: 7.5 – Quick feet and burst, able to recover well.
Man Coverage: 5 – Not asked to do much, limited tape.
Zone Coverage: 6 – Decent vision and can cover ground.
Tackles: 6.5 – Physical and a hard-hitter, but an inconsistent tackler.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Northwestern
61
Greg Newsome II
Pick #61 – Ravens
Georgia, Junior, #6 CB, #57 OVR
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 190 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
7
Agility
7.5
Man CVGE
7.5
Zone CVGE
8
TACKLES
7
GP
17
TACKLES
71
PD
20
INT
1
FF
0
FR
1

Greg Newsome II came out of high school as a three-star prospect and did land other scholarships from the major conferences. He was very undersized coming out of high school which kept most of the elite schools away, but Newsome has grown into being a quality-sized corner. Newsome made an impact in his first season and jumped right into a starting role the year after. Northwestern has had some tough defenses over the last few years as they have been making a splash in the Big 10. Newsome dealt with some injuries in his last year but NFL scouts already had him as one of the better corners in this year’s draft. However, that durability might be questioned by some. Newsome is likely headed to a team that needs a second outside quarterback and will be looking for him to deliver right away.

Strengths

• Physical
• Good Instincts
• Run Support
• Fluid Hips
• Quick Burst
• Ball Skills
• Locating The Ball

Weaknesses

• Was not tested vertically enough, could struggle due to open-field speed.
• Durability

There aren’t a ton of eye-popping weaknesses for Newsome if you even want to call these two listed above eye-popping. Newsome could struggle vertically given he doesn’t have that elite speed that he might see at this level. Although his pro day numbers jumped out in speed, but so far everybody’s has. He wasn’t tested enough and when he was tested there was some inconsistent play. However, Newsome is still very agile and makes jumps on the ball. He is strong in run support and also very physical. What he lacks in speed he makes up for with great instincts and ability to stay with receivers.

College Production

2020 stats – 3 GP, 12 tackles, 0 sacks, 7 PD, 0 FF, 0 FR, 1 INT
Overall stats – 17 GP, 71 tackles, 0 sack, 20 PD, 0 FF, 1 FR, 1 INT

Newsome broke into the starting side his sophomore year and stood out as one of the up-and-coming cornerbacks. His Junior year was a bit limited due to injuries, which have been there in his career. Even with a limited season in 2020, he had nine pass breakups and an interception in about five games.

Best Landing Spot

Zone coverage schemes benefit Newsome the most, any team that plays a heavier zone would be best for Newsome. He also fits as a CB2, and would fit right into teams that have a solidified CB1 already. Green Bay is somewhere that mixes in quite a bit of zone, and Newsome would play opposite Jaire Alexander. The Chargers and Bills are two other spots that would work well for him.

Worst Landing Spot

While Newsome isn’t limited to being zone, any team that fails to maximize his best abilities could see him struggle early. If we are looking solely at teams that need corners, Detroit, Las Vegas, and Houston are the three worst landing spots right now.

Draft Range

2nd Round

NFL Comparison

If Newsome ends up playing closer to his pro day speed, he will be on par with Xavier Rhodes in terms of being a perfect mix of physicality and speed. Although he has a smaller frame from Rhodes. If he plays more like his speed shown on tape, he has the upside of a Byron Jones. Certainly, both are two names to be in good company.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Very instinctive in reading plays and routes.
Speed: 7 – Decent speed, but would like to see another gear.
Agility: 7.5 – Quick burst and natural hips.
Man Coverage: 7.5 – Good physicality and sticks hip and hip with receivers.
Zone Coverage: 8 – High IQ and burst makes him a great zone player.
Tackles: 7 – Smaller frame but strong in run support and locking up tackles.


By: Jason Guilbault @JGuilbault11

Louisville
62
Tutu Atwell
Pick #62 – Washington
Purdue, Junior, #10 WR, #58 OVR
21 yrs | 5’9″ | 165 lbs
Hands
4
Routes
6
Agility
8
Speed
9
Jumping
7
Size
2
GP
32
REC
129
REC YDS
2,303
TD
20
YDS/REC
16.6

Former high school quarterback Chatarius “Tutu” Atwell has really excelled at the wide receiver position in his last two seasons playing at Louisville. During his sophomore season, Atwell broke the school record with 1,276 receiving yards, which also led the ACC. Atwell was having another strong season in 2020 before opting out for the remainder of the season on December 8th. A small receiver at just 5’9” and 165 pounds, Atwell is a player who will work best out of the slot in the NFL. His speed and quickness are his biggest assets. For Atwell, his size will be his biggest obstacle to overcome in the NFL. He has some great NFL qualities but he also has a number of cons that make him more of a late second or early third-round pick.

Strengths

• Speed
• Athleticism
• Competitiveness
• Footwork
• Ability to Run The Ball

Weaknesses

• Below Average Hands
• Needs to Improve Route Running
• Can’t Handle Contact
• Size
• Ball Security
• Breaking Tackles

Atwell is the type of receiver who is going to rely on his speed at the next level. He lacks size, has trouble breaking tackles and for a wide receiver, his hands are less than desirable. Atwell is far from a complete NFL product but his competitiveness is an encouraging sign that he can improve in some of these areas at the next level. It is clear what his role will be in the NFL, working in the slot, running end around, and being a deep play threat. As long as he can work on his hands and holding onto the football through contact, Atwell can have a very successful NFL career in his role. Otherwise, Atwell will likely be a trick play and special teams player throughout a very limited career.

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 9 , REC: 46 , REC Yards: 625 , TD: 7 , YDS/REC: 13.6
Overall stats – GP: 32 , REC: 139 , REC Yards: 2303 , TD: 20 , YDS/REC: 16.6

You can see the type of player Atwell is just by looking at his numbers. In three college seasons, Atwell averaged 16.6 yards per reception. He also scored a touchdown on more than one in every seven receptions throughout his career. His 2020 stats were limited due to him playing in just nine games. However, Atwell was fairly dominant at the college level despite some questionable quarterback play at Louisville.

Best Landing Spot

While every team could use a speedy slot receiver in the third round, the Green Bay Packers are one team that could really use his assets. Assuming Devin Funchess doesn’t opt-out for a second-straight season in 2021, the Packers will have a WR2 to work opposite of Davante Adams. Adding in Atwell as a WR3/4 in the slot to work with Marquez Valdes-Scantling could add a nice new dimension to an already dangerous Packers’ offense. The Packers are likely to address other issues early in the draft so landing Atwell at the end of the second or even better, the third round, would be a nice addition to the team.

Worst Landing Spot

The Kansas City Chiefs are another team that may look to add a wide receiver in the draft. Demarcus Robinson, Sammy Watkins, and Byron Pringle are all free agents. If none of those three returned to Kansas City, the Chiefs would want to fill the void with some size at wide receiver, since they already have a speedster in Tyreek Hill. If any or all of those three returned to Kansas City next season, it would be hard to imagine Atwell finding much opportunity in an offense already loaded with speed. Tight end Travis Kelce owns the middle of the field, Hill is the deep threat, and Watkins is a nice combination of speed and size that Atwell can’t match. There just doesn’t seem to be much opportunity for Atwell in a fully-loaded Chiefs’ offense.

Draft Range

Late Second Round/Early Third Round

NFL Comparison

Tutu Atwell’s best NFL comparison has to be Tavon Austin. Both receivers are small speedsters that sit around the 5’8”-5’9” mark. However, Austin has filled out more at 180 pounds compared to just 165 for Atwell. Coming out of college, both Austin and Atwell fit the ideal role of a deep-threat slot receiver. Austin has had some trouble with ball security throughout his career and has been near the top of the league in drop percentage on multiple occasions. This is something that we could end up seeing with Atwell as well. Now, Austin is bouncing around the NFL working primarily in the return game, which is also something that could happen to Atwell near the end of his career. Austin last played for the Packers last season in a very limited role. Perhaps Atwell will be his replacement in Green Bay.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9 – Speed is his biggest asset.
Agility: 8 – Good at using agility to create separation.
Routes: 6 – Unpolished route runner
Hands: 4 – Less than reliable hands. Can drop easy passes.
Jumping: 7 – Above average vertical.
Size: 2 – 5’9” and 165 pounds. Needs to add weight without sacrificing speed.


By: Calvin McAlee @McaleeCalvin

Houston
63
Payton Turner
Pick #63 – Chiefs
Houston, Senior, #8 EDGE, #64 OVR
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 270 lbs
IQ
8.5
Athleticism
6
Mechanics
5.5
Pass Rush
6.5
Run Def
7.5
Strength
9
GP
36
TACKLES
114
SACKS
9.5
TFL
23.5
FF
1
FR
0

Payton Turner was only a two-star recruit when he came out of Westside High School in Houston, Texas. However, the Houston Cougars gave Payton Turner a chance, and over the course of four years, it was clear that Turner developed himself into an NFL-caliber player.

Turner was not highly touted by the NFL draft community going into his senior season. In fact, you rarely saw him as someone who was even projected to get drafted. However, in 2020 Turner racked up 5 sacks and 10.5 tackles for loss in just five games and made a massive name for himself. On top of this, his huge frame allowed him to knock down several balls. His size and production instantly became a talking point as many see him fitting in both 4-3 and 3-4 schemes.

Strengths

• Great Size
• Big Production Senior Year
• Power and Strength is Fantastic
• Good hand fighting
• Great Play Recognition
• 3-4/4-3 Versatility as EDGE/3-Tech/5-Tech

There are a ton of positives that jump out at you when watching the 2019 and 2020 tape of Turner’s. First of all, his size and versatility must be noted. His strength and size will allow him to play 4-3 Edge or rotate on the interior for some pass-rushing downs, and he could easily slip in as an OLB or 5-tech in a 3-4 front. For teams with hybrid fronts, Turner is a dream come true. On top of that produced his last year of college, which is always great to see, and a lot of that production was off the back of strength, high football-IQ plays, and a high motor. He also has above-average hand placement and fighting for a college prospect.

Weaknesses

• Not Super Athletic
• Pushed Off the Line on Runs
• Minimal Pass Rush Moves
• Not Explosive Off The Ball

The only negative on film that is not really fixable was the pure speed, as he is much slower with his first step, acceleration, and top-end speed than other EDGE rushers in this class. The other two negatives are something that you see with most college prospects. His stance and first step could be better, and he needs to be coached up about pad level. On top of that, he will need to add more pass rush moves at the NFL level.

College Production

2019 Stats – GP: 5, TACKLES: 25, SACKS: 5, TFL: 10.5, FF: 1,FR: 0
Overall Stats – GP: 36, TACKLES: 114, SACKS: 9.5, TFL: 23.5, FF: 1,FR: 0

Payton Turner’s numbers speak for themselves in his senior season. He was averaging a sack and two tackles for loss per game. This was a ridiculous pace that saw just how dominant Turner had become at the collegiate level. It is clear that he is ready to make the jump to the NFL.

Best Landing Spot

The Baltimore Ravens may just be the best landing spot for Turner. The Ravens run a 3-4 hybrid scheme that would allow Turner the opportunity to play multiple positions. The Ravens could turn Turner into a do-it-all weapon. I would love to see turner play both the 5-Tech and OLB on some plays, as well as rush the interior every once in a while.

Worst Landing Spot

As for many defensive line players, one of the worst spots is the Dallas Cowboys. Not only is the scheme extremely vanilla, putting a ton of pressure on the 4-3 DE’s to produce on their own without any kind of scheme help, but also the team seemingly cannot develop defensive talent. Turner undoubtedly needs some good coaching at the next level, and I highly doubt that happens with America’s Team.

Draft Range

Late 2nd- 3rd Round

NFL Comparison

One player that comes to mind when watching Payton Turner play 4-3 EDGE is Carlos Dunlap. Both of these guys are much stronger than the average EDGE player and have fantastic length to bat balls down and get their arms out to slow down runners. They also are both extremely smart football players who are able to recognize plays rather well. Dunlap is obviously a proven talent at this point, but Turner has the same build when it comes to what kind of EDGE he is going to be. Neither is a world-beater when it comes to speed but can still produce at the NFL level.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8.5 – Wonderful play recognition
Athleticism: 6 – Agile, but not very fast or quick
Mechanics: 5.5 – Mechanics needs coaching up at the next level
Pass Rush: 6.5 – Good Power but has to add more moves
Run Defense: 7.5 – Good at getting off blocks and sealing the edge
Strength: 9 – Ridiculously strong for his position as an EDGE


By: Matthew Amato @MattAmatoSF

Kyle Trask
64
Kyle Trask
Pick #64 – Buccaneers
Florida, Senior, #6 QB, #38 OVR
22 yrs | 6’5″ | 240 lbs
Vision
8
Accuracy
9
Arm
6
Pocket IQ
8
Mechanics
6
Mobility
4
GP
27
COMP%
67.9%
PASS YDS
7,386
TDs
69
INT
15
RTG
168.5

Compared to most other quarterbacks, especially in Division I, Kyle Trask has had an odd career yet still has managed to become a legit NFL prospect. In high school, Trask was a starter as a freshman and then played backup for the next three seasons. At Manvel High School in Texas, where football talent was overflowing, Trask was moved to backup behind now Miami quarterback D’Eriq King. Despite being a “backup” for three seasons, Trask managed to impress at a showcase for the University of Florida and he finally got his first Power 5 scholarship offer. Once at Florida, Trask was once again placed in the backup role, this time behind highly recruited Feleipe Franks. After seeing very little action in his first couple of seasons, Trask finally got his opportunity in his junior season after an injury to Franks. Trask would go on to start his first game in over five seasons and never look back. After proving himself his junior season, Trask entered his senior year as the Gators’ starting quarterback. He put up one of the best statistical seasons for a quarterback in SEC history. The 6’5” 240 pound senior threw for 4,283 yards (second-most in the country) and 43 touchdowns (led the nation) against just eight interceptions. In just over a year, Trask went from an unthought-of backup quarterback to a second-round NFL prospect who has the potential to be a star for the team willing to give him a chance.

Strengths

• Accuracy
• Pocket Presence
• Timing
• Football IQ
• Decision Making
• Size
• Work Ethic

Weaknesses

• Mobility
• Avoiding the Rush

College Production

2020 stats – GP: 13, COMP%: 77.4, PASS YDS: 4,500, PASS TD: 41, INT: 4, RTG: 203.1
Overall stats – GP: 30, COMP%: 74.3%, PASS YDS: 6,126, PASS TD: 56, INT: 7, RTG: 197.6

Trask is a 6’5” 240 pound quarterback with a strong arm and great accuracy. He has shown throughout his high school and college career that he has tremendous patience and work ethic as he has repeatedly waited for his chance to prove his talent. In the NFL, he could wind up in the same situation again. Trask has an excellent football IQ and he is a great decision maker. He doesn’t force passes and he limits turnovers. While he has very good pocket presence, he isn’t the best at avoiding the rush. With his size, he can be tough for some college players to take down but in the NFL, he won’t have much of an advantage there. One thing you won’t get with Trask is a mobile quarterback who is a threat to run.

Best Landing Spot

The 2021 NFL Draft class has a lot of high-level quarterback talent. Trask is very talented but he isn’t in the same category as Trevor Lawrence, Zach Wilson, or Justin Fields. Since Trask is more of a second or third-round option, he is likely to begin his NFL career as a backup while he waits for his opportunity (something he is used to). So look for a team with an aging quarterback to take a shot on Trask after addressing other issues with their first or even second pick. A team where Trask would fit well would be the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The defending Super Bowl champions still have Tom Brady for a year, maybe even another four at the rate he is going. This gives Trask an opportunity to sit behind the G.O.A.T. and soak up the knowledge (much like Aaron Rodgers did behind Brett Favre). The offense wouldn’t have to adjust much from Brady to Trask as they are both non-mobile quarterbacks who like to sit in the pocket and make smart, safe throws. Trask has a fairly strong arm that would help get the ball to a deep threat like Chris Godwin, if he stays in Tampa. Some quarterbacks wouldn’t want to sit for a couple of years after being drafted, but with Trask, that wouldn’t be an issue. This would be a win-win for both Tampa and Trask.

Worst Landing Spot

The Baltimore Ravens are likely going to look to add another quarterback to their roster this offseason. RG3 is now a free agent and while Trace McSorley is still on the roster, adding another quarterback for competition at backup is still a smart move. This means Baltimore could elect to take a quarterback in the middle of the draft, possibly in the third round. However, if they do, Kyle Trask is not the best fit for that system. Trask and Lamar Jackson are as opposite as it gets. Jackson is a speedy and mobile quarterback who lacks accuracy and doesn’t exactly have an NFL-caliber arm. Trask is a slow, non-mobile quarterback with excellent accuracy and an NFL-caliber arm. Switching this run-heavy Ravens’ offense into a West Coast style of offense, which Trask would be at his best, is not an ideal move for either party involved. Trask would be limited in showing his potential and the Ravens would need an offensive overhaul down the road if they wanted to make him their new franchise quarterback. So whether or not Jackson remains in Baltimore past 2021 when his rookie deal expires, Trask is not their best option as a replacement or backup.

Draft Range

Late Second Round/Early Third Round

NFL Comparison

When you notice how big Kyle Trask is and also watch him play, he is most likely to remind you of Ben Roethlisberger. They are built exactly the same as they both sit 6’5” and 240 pounds. Neither quarterback is known for their mobility but they both have great pocket presence and a strong and accurate arm. Like Roethlisberger, Trask is good at throwing the deep ball and leading his receivers so that they can make the most out of every play. Roethlisberger has put up a lot of big statistical games in his career and Trask is capable of filling the stat sheet as well, all while limiting turnovers. Give Trask some elite defenses like Roethlisberger has had over his career and he could end up just as successful if he lives up to his potential.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 8 – Good field vision, knows when to throw and when to move on.
Accuracy: 9 – Leads his receivers and throws and accurate deep ball.
Arm Strength: 6 – He doesn’t have the strongest arm in the world but it is above average.
Pocket Presence: 8 – Feels the rush well and knows when to get rid of the ball.
Mechanics: 6 – Footwork can use some improvement.
Mobility: 4 – Not a threat to run and doesn’t avoid the rush well.


By: Calvin McAlee @McaleeCalvin