NFL Rosters 2020 (Updated Live)

With free agents moving, trades going down, and the NFL Draft that brings in an abundance of fresh names, we need to keep track who is where. Each team’s roster page brings you some notable information about each player’s background. We give info on their physical attributes, birthdays, experience, college information, and draft information. Keep track of roster moves, and incoming rookies on both sides of the ball. It is an overlooked part of being a fan. If you're checking out players for your fantasy football draft, stay up to date with our nfl depth charts and Fantasy Football Rankings. We have historical and live NFL snap counts and nfl targets as well to help you ace your draft.

With free agents moving, trades going down, and the NFL Draft that brings in an abundance of fresh names, we need to keep track who is where. Each team’s roster page brings you some notable information about each player’s background. We give info on their physical attributes, birthdays, experience, college information, and draft information. Keep track of roster moves, and incoming rookies on both sides of the ball. It is an overlooked part of being a fan. If you're checking out players for your fantasy football draft, stay up to date with our nfl depth charts and Fantasy Football Rankings. We have historical and live NFL snap counts and nfl targets as well to help you ace your draft.

Breaking Down NFL Roster Related Rules

Whether the offseason is upon us, or we are smack dab in the middle of the regular season, NFL rosters are always changing. We may see some trades throughout the year, free agent signings, and plenty of roster cuts. In April, we also have the NFL Draft each year, which drops in over a hundred new players added to current rosters. Throughout the summer, the roster sizes expand but must be cut down to 53 players by Week 1. Each week in preseason also has a cut deadline. Forty-six players are active on game day, and ten players can be kept on the practice squad. Each team’s roster page brings you some important information about each player’s background. We give info on their physical attributes, birthdays, experience, college information, and draft information. From this roster page, you can begin to dive into other areas of the site, such as NFL depth charts.

How NFL Free Agency Works

If players do not resign with their teams or extend their contracts, at some point, they will become a free agent. However, that may or may not be a good thing depending on your position and age. Because the NFL has a salary cap, teams will enter the free agent period with only so much to spend. We can get these numbers from what they are paying already for players under contract, and deduct from the salary cap. Now teams can sign players throughout the season to the point where they will not even be in the free agent pool. But each year, there will be select names that teams will compete for the top free agents.

Now before the free agent period starts, teams are supposed to be limited to no contact, unless that team had him under contract already. Communication before the free agent period is tampering; it is not closely tracked but could result in fines or a loss of draft picks. When the free agent period starts, it is an open game for all teams to contact these players and try to work out a deal with a team. We will begin to see players start to sign with teams.

Some teams have been smart about their free agency spending, and just because they have the cap space to spend, it doesn’t mean that they will. Teams that have little cap space will have to navigate their roster by possibly cutting some dead weight to open up the door. We saw the Colts recently sit still in free agency despite having a lot to spend, while the Jets decided to drop a ton of cash on Le’Veon Bell, which has not worked out.

How NFL Contracts Work

NFL contracts can be a tricky thing to break down because there is a lot in play from both the agent’s side, as well as the team’s side. When looking at a contract, you will see the number of years signed, an overall salary they would receive if they complete the contract, and then guaranteed money. Now guaranteed money is the money they would receive despite being released, where the rest of the contract would become void. Guaranteed money once collected means that play could also be released, and the team does not owe him anything. If a team does need to pay out guaranteed money and that player is off the team, it will become dead money.

There are things such as signing bonuses and incentives. We saw Richard Sherman tear his Achilles recently, and no team was going to sign him to a big deal or give him any sort of big salary for an older player coming off this type of injury. Sherman worked his contracts to receive incentives for his play, essentially betting on himself. His above-average play eventually got him a strong return when the season was over. Incentives are a crucial part of a contract. The signing bonus is as well, especially in a rookie contract.

When rookies come into the league and if they get offered a contract, it will be a mandatory four years. For some positions, this is fine, but for running backs, this is a big problem for them looking to land their second contract. A rookie deal is on a wage scale, which is based on round. When a running back comes off a rookie contract, they might be 26-27 years old. No team is going to put out a massive 4-5 year contract for these players who will begin to fall off in production if they haven’t begun to either. Quarterbacks are in the best shape because they can play 15 plus years, and for some reason, even if they are bad, they make plenty of money.

How Is The NFL Salary Allocated?

One of the major advantages is hitting on a quarterback, and having a strong roster around them while he is on his rookie contract. Winning the QB draft is big because you are getting potentially elite levels before you have to back up the Brinks truck and pay them. The Kansas City Chiefs have Patrick Mahomes, and before a big contract, they were able to pay others and also bring home a championship. When you look at quarterback salaries around the league, you will notice teams with younger quarterbacks will have lesser salaries tied to the position. Once you move up the list, you will see more established quarterbacks who have been in the league for a while now.

Having money tied to your running back isn’t necessarily a smart decision. Running backs are replaceable, and often you are going to want to spend that money on more important positions. We have seen some teams pay up at the position, which leaves them struggling for money elsewhere. That is unless they have a quarterback still on their rookie contract. There is no link to immediate success, but long term success is tied to not locking in a running back to big contracts. Wide receivers are always going to be a collective group of salaries, and paying these names can be considered more important. Looking through the salary allocated by position, you can see potentially how good a receiving core is.

The offensive line is incredibly important. It is the core of your offense, and how well you will be able to run that offense. Paying names after their rookie contract is up can give you further success, and we have seen some of the more successful teams end up paying more money for the position. Teams that don’t either don’t value the position, fail to hold onto offensive lineman coming off contracts, or have a mix of veterans and rookie contract players to where it shows they just have names under contract.

On the defensive side, there are a lot of different ways to allocate salary. Teams can invest in their defensive line and linebacking core, which might leave them a thin in the secondary. This isn’t a bad thing, given defenses with a strong pass rush can help out an average secondary. The opposite effect can occur as well, as teams can provide coverage sacks. Overall they are intertwined in different ways but balancing out a roster with salaries is critical for how teams are going to be successful over multiple seasons.

What’s More Important, Offense Or Defense?

After a few consistent decades of offensive numbers, we have begun to see more increases in offensive numbers. More so points per game and yards per game. A lot of this has to do with the pass-happy era we have entered. Overall, teams are gaining a high in yards per play over the last few seasons. This might hurt some of the older guys out there who prefer a 13-10 game in comparison to 34-31. One of the reasons why this has changed is that the game has changed its rules. We have seen more pass interference numbers, and overall penalties per game are on the rise. Moving the ball without having to run the clock is going to increase points. We are also viewing some of the best athletes we have ever seen, and very creative coaches that make it tough on opposing defenses. Overall it is not entirely defenses faults for not having the ability to hold teams to 14 points per game anymore.

The offenses that are adjusting to the times are having vastly more success in the long run, and the same can be said for more aggressive teams. Continuously punting and hoping for a stop is not going to get your team anywhere. Throughout the league, we are watching a pretty big gap in play between the top and bottom offenses. The same can be said for defenses. But teams with a bad defense can still have success with a good offense. Those shootout style games have become more popular, and that is because teams will prioritize offense a bit more, or just flat out have a bad defense. Strong defenses have to rely on their offense to put up numbers, and if that offense is struggling, it isn’t like the defense can put up 21 points of their own.

Having a good offense is essential, and it also factors into how a defense can play. If they are always on the field because the offense continuously goes three and out, it doesn’t matter how good a defense is, they are going to become burned out and give up points. We have seen that with teams that turn over the ball. Even an average offense can affect the defense, as it takes the pressure off of them a bit, but also keeps them fresh if they can get them a few drives to rest. The object of the game is to score points, and overall we have seen offenses have more success. If we are looking at a singular game worth, we might see a defense be the game-changer or vice versa. But throughout the season, we see offensive worth much higher.

Will we see some seasons where bad offenses find some success, and vice versa, you bet we will. There are always going to be outliers no matter where you look, that can be time success or players having randomly bad seasons or good ones. To look at some recent examples of strong defenses that struggled, the Jets had a decent defense in 2019 but could not score more the life of them. They ended up third in the division. Chicago, in the same season, allowed the fewest points in the division and ended up finishing .500, which was third in the division. When looking at those seasons, we saw the teams finishing at the top of the division, also leading the way in points scored. All but one team that led the division in points missed the playoffs. The game has changed from a grind-it-out style of play, and putting up numbers and being aggressive has been more important.

When Are NFL Rosters Finalized?

A week before the regular season starts, NFL rosters must be finalized and cut down from about 90 players to 53. Throughout the summer and preseason, these numbers will already start to dwindle down, but this is a hard cutoff date that changes each year.

When Are NFL Roster Cuts?

There will be sets of roster cuts throughout the offseason and leading into the preseason. Overall the final set of cuts will be a week before the season starts. Teams will begin to fine-tune their rosters for what the final cut will be.

What Is The NFL Roster Size?

Over the summer, a roster can be anywhere from 60-90 players based on draft picks, recent signings, and players getting a chance to workout. However, once the regular season starts, the roster size will need to be 53 at all times throughout the regular and postseason.

Best NFL Roster Of All-Time?

The 1985 Chicago Bears put together one of the top rosters of all-time. The Bears have arguably the best defense assembled for all-time, but they also had Walter Payton and Jim McMahon. They rolled through the season and won a lopsided Super Bowl.

Which NFL Roster Is The Youngest?

The Miami Dolphins currently have the youngest roster based on average age. This is no surprise given they are a team built off of recent draft picks and younger players that they are trying to see what they have. The upcoming draft picks will add to this.

Which NFL Roster Is The Oldest?

The New England Patriots have the oldest roster based on average age. Of course, this has a lot to do with them never really drafting a ton of young players, and they have kept a core of older players around for a while now.

How Are Pro Bowl Rosters Selected?

Pro Bowl rosters are selected by voting, which comes from coaches, players, and fans. Each will make up a third of the votes. Rosters will change if players pull out of the Pro Bowl or are currently in the Super Bowl.

What Is The NFL Salary Cap For The 2020 Season?

The 2020 salary cap for the NFL season is set at $198.2 million, and this is a hard cap meaning that teams cannot go over this number. This is to create a more level playing field for big and small-market teams. It is up to $10 million from 2019.

How Is NFL Salary Cap Determined?

The NFL salary cap changes each year because every year, the revenue changes. It is tied to the revenue, which is reflected by things like TV deals, advertisements, and any sort of income in the league. This sets the cap on how teams spend on players.