Tight End (TE) Snap Counts 2021

There a few type of tight ends that can dictate how they are used in an offense. The versatile blocking and receiving tight ends tend to play the most snaps of the group. Blocking tight ends will be used heavily on run heavy teams, while receiving tight ends can get less work if their blocking skills lack. Teams tend to have both available for their weekly game plan, which can vary. There are a handful of tight ends that can play over 80%, like Darren Waller and Travis Kelce. Teams that run more pass heavy offenses, like the New York Giants, will lean on their receiving tight ends, like Evan Engram. Tight ends are not as volatile as some of the other positions, but game plans do have more stake into how many snaps they see on a weekly basis. Snaps don’t necessarily transition into fantasy points at this position, so knowing the difference between receiving and blocking tight ends is key.

$5,000 Risk-Free Bet $1,000 Risk-Free Bet $1,000 Risk-Free Bet
To win MVP
+25000 +36000 +25000
To win Offensive Player of the Year
+3000 +2500
Most Receiving Yards in League
+2500 +2500
Most Receptions in League
+2500
Most Receiving TDs in League
+1200

There a few type of tight ends that can dictate how they are used in an offense. The versatile blocking and receiving tight ends tend to play the most snaps of the group. Blocking tight ends will be used heavily on run heavy teams, while receiving tight ends can get less work if their blocking skills lack. Teams tend to have both available for their weekly game plan, which can vary. There are a handful of tight ends that can play over 80%, like Darren Waller and Travis Kelce. Teams that run more pass heavy offenses, like the New York Giants, will lean on their receiving tight ends, like Evan Engram. Tight ends are not as volatile as some of the other positions, but game plans do have more stake into how many snaps they see on a weekly basis. Snaps don’t necessarily transition into fantasy points at this position, so knowing the difference between receiving and blocking tight ends is key.

NAME RTG TEAM DEPTH Wk1 Wk2 Wk3 Wk4 Wk5 Wk6 Total Avg TM SNAP % TD
Tyler Conklin
70
MIN 1 59 49 54 57 50 76 345 57 78.1 1
Dalton Schultz
72
DAL 1 57 45 53 48 57 75 335 55 74.4 3
Noah Fant
83
DEN 1 51 53 58 57 58 72 349 58 86.4 3
Travis Kelce
99
KC 1 55 44 69 59 75 67 369 61 85.8 4
Tyler Higbee
84
LAR 1 52 59 49 54 56 66 336 56 89.1 2
Dawson Knox
77
BUF 1 48 54 62 58 55 61 338 56 77.7 5
Ricky Seals-Jones
70
WAS 1 10 7 8 62 82 59 228 38 58.6 2
Durham Smythe
69
MIA 2 38 22 34 21 36 58 209 34 54
Evan Engram
85
NYG 1 39 43 50 55 187 46 46.1
T.J. Hockenson
85
DET 1 78 53 53 58 55 52 349 58 84.3 2
C.J. Uzomah
75
CIN 1 51 40 33 48 56 50 278 46 75.5 3
Mike Gesicki
85
MIA 1 21 47 55 36 42 49 250 41 64.6 1
O.J. Howard
82
TB 2 6 11 14 51 44 49 175 29 40.9 1
Cole Kmet
74
CHI 1 51 47 43 57 51 48 297 49 82
Blake Jarwin
75
DAL 2 48 29 43 33 31 47 231 38 51.3 2
Will Dissly
77
SEA 2 38 26 20 46 57 47 234 39 67.4 1
Darren Waller
90
LV 1 81 61 66 53 64 46 371 61 89.4 2
Zach Ertz
82
PHI 4 41 37 30 37 40 46 231 38 60.8 2
Pat Freiermuth
73
PIT 1 29 33 30 32 32 45 201 33 50.6 1
Austin Hooper
86
CLE 2 38 42 49 56 52 44 281 46 68.5 1
Cameron Brate
74
TB 1 18 21 33 50 28 44 194 32 45.3
Dan Arnold
73
JAX 1 33 22 27 18 52 41 193 32 47.5
Ian Thomas
72
CAR 2 35 52 37 44 45 40 253 42 59.1
Marcedes Lewis
77
GB 2 15 36 25 35 29 40 180 30 47.4
Pharaoh Brown
67
HOU 2 59 38 31 34 37 40 239 39 63.7
Drew Sample
67
CIN 2 35 21 21 29 21 39 166 27 45.1
Jonnu Smith
83
NE 2 55 29 30 28 40 39 221 36 57.9 1
Geoff Swaim
69
TEN 3 25 64 44 32 36 38 239 39 54.7
Noah Gray
67
KC 2 7 11 18 38 74 14 17.2
Tommy Tremble
70
CAR 1 12 29 19 27 27 38 152 25 35.5 2
Hunter Henry
86
NE 1 54 47 52 40 40 37 270 45 70.7 3
Mark Andrews
87
BAL 1 55 57 46 46 56 37 297 49 71.2 3
Robert Tonyan
77
GB 1 28 28 46 56 38 37 233 38 61.3 1
Jared Cook
84
LAC 1 47 42 46 39 50 36 260 43 61.3 2
Eric Ebron
80
PIT 2 27 24 47 28 25 34 185 30 46.6 1
Kyle Rudolph
82
NYG 2 47 49 29 37 41 34 237 39 58.4
Jordan Akins
74
HOU 1 47 38 34 18 27 32 196 32 52.3
Gerald Everett
77
SEA 1 39 43 42 31 155 38 44.7 1
Jack Doyle
75
IND 2 45 50 35 21 50 31 232 38 59.2
Chris Manhertz
73
JAX 4 26 27 25 24 22 30 154 25 39.4 1
Antony Auclair
67
HOU 3 33 10 13 16 20 28 120 20 32 1
Eric Saubert
67
DEN 2 22 24 24 8 16 28 122 20 30.2
David Njoku
76
CLE 1 35 36 50 52 46 26 245 40 59.8 1
Donald Parham Jr.
67
LAC 2 41 34 31 39 40 26 211 35 49.8 2
Darrell Daniels
67
ARI 2 15 19 23 15 25 97 19 23.6
Foster Moreau
69
LV 2 46 38 47 17 15 25 188 31 45.3 1
Chris Herndon
67
MIN 2 12 12 12 7 7 24 74 12 16.7 1
Mo Alie-Cox
74
IND 1 39 27 28 49 31 24 198 33 50.5 3
Eric Tomlinson
67
BAL 3 19 12 15 25 7 23 101 16 24.2
Zach Gentry
67
PIT 3 16 8 17 11 22 23 97 16 24.4

There a few type of tight ends that can dictate how they are used in an offense. The versatile blocking and receiving tight ends tend to play the most snaps of the group. Blocking tight ends will be used heavily on run heavy teams, while receiving tight ends can get less work if their blocking skills lack. Teams tend to have both available for their weekly game plan, which can vary. There are a handful of tight ends that can play over 80%, like Darren Waller and Travis Kelce. Teams that run more pass heavy offenses, like the New York Giants, will lean on their receiving tight ends, like Evan Engram. Tight ends are not as volatile as some of the other positions, but game plans do have more stake into how many snaps they see on a weekly basis. Snaps don’t necessarily transition into fantasy points at this position, so knowing the difference between receiving and blocking tight ends is key.