NFL Draft Guide NFL Draft Guide

Top 50 NFL Draft Prospects

We are profiling the Top 50 players in the 2020 NFL Draft Class. These are the best college football players in the country and we’re dissecting them all. We look at their statistics, intangibles, prospect ranking, ideal landing spot, worst landing spot and compare them to current NFL players. We also predict draft order and the NFL team that will draft each of our prospects. It’s fun and subjective. We’ll be announcing each player on Twitter as well @lineups.

Joe Burrow
1
Joe Burrow
LSU, Senior, #1 QB, Pick #1
23 yrs | 6’4″ | 216 lbs
Vision
8
Accuracy
9
Arm
7
Pocket IQ
8
Mechanics
7
Mobility
7
GP
37
COMP%
69%
PASS YDS
8,389
INT
73
RTG
172.2

Before the start of the college season, many were thinking Tua Tagovailoa would be the first pick overall, or even the star pass-rusher Chase Young. Joe Burrow stole the show in his senior season. He took home a Heisman Trophy, finishing the season with over 5,000 passing yards and 50 touchdowns. Burrow averaged 10.9 yards per attempt, and only turned the ball over six times. His pocket presence was spectacular, and will need to bring that to the next level. Burrow had some fantastic receiving options like Justin Jefferson and Ja’Marr Chase. Burrow has moved ahead of the remaining quarterback prospects and will likely be taken first overall. That means he will be heading back to Ohio, where he started off his college career before transferring down to LSU. Burrow is a big 6’4 quarterback who stands tall in the pocket, and moves well for his size. To think we Burrow lost his job to Dwayne Haskins, and blossomed after transferring. Look for Burrow to be the first name called during the 2020 NFL Draft.

Strengths

•   IQ
•   Accuracy
•   Leadership
•   Pocket Presence
•   Mechanics

Weaknesses

•   Arm Strength
•   Mobility

If I am going to nitpick Joe Burrow, the arm strength is still above average but isn’t quite as elite as some of the other quarterbacks in this class. Is this a significant problem? No, I don’t think so. Burrow threw the deep ball with success, and we can chalk some of that success up to his top wideouts. Burrow’s IQ and accuracy were at elite levels in 2019, which mask his arm strength. At 6’4 and well over 200 points, Burrow has a strong pocket presence, but his mobility is about what you’d expect for someone of his size. Once again, this is more nitpicking for some weaknesses here, as he has average mobility and isn’t a complete tree stump back there. As far as strengths go, Burrow showed off a tremendous football IQ. His pocket presence was on another level, and he works through his progressions with ease. Burrow has a calm nature to him, yet he is the clear leader of this LSU offense. With Cincinnati likely taking him, they need a clear guy on offense that can get this team going. While we have just a one-year sample size with Burrow, his 77% completion rate was a 20% increase from the year prior. He will have to still prove he is not just a one-hit-wonder.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 14, COMP%: 77.6, PASS YDS: 5,208, PASS TD: 55, INT: 6, RTG: 204
Overall stats – GP: 37, COMP%: 69, PASS YDS: 8,389, PASS TD: 73, INT: 11, RTG: 172.2

Best Landing Spot

Cincinnati is officially on the clock, and Joe Burrow is the likely candidate to head to the Bengals. We can make jokes about the Bengals, but honestly, this is not a bad spot for Burrow to get into. We will have to see what A.J. Green does, but Joe Mixon, Tyler Boyd, John Ross, Auden Tate, and Tyler Eifert make up the skill position spots around him. This is a fairly good offensive core to jump right into. With Washington, Detroit, and New York picking behind them, they have young or already established quarterbacks already. Cincinnati is going to need to continue to invest in the offensive line, which should be a big priority this offseason. They will get back Jonah Williams after he missed the entire rookie 2019 season.

Worst Landing Spot

Now I don’t see Cincinnati passing up on Joe Burrow, but say they do, would Washington draft him despite taking Dwayne Haskins last season. Washington would be the worst spot here. I love Terry McLaurin, but Washington lacks immediate receiving help for a new quarterback. The offensive line is in bad shape, and overall this organization continues to be poorly run.

Draft Range

Picks 1-3

NFL Comparison

We have heard numerous comparisons for Joe Burrow already, comparing from Tom Brady to Tony Romo. He even got a comparison to Peyton Manning. Certainly, he is in high praise right now with what he is doing. We can eliminate any sort of mobile quarterback from comparisons, and look at true pocket passers. However, I won’t link him with the cannon-armed quarterbacks either. When you really get into it, Brady and Romo are pretty fair comparisons for what he does well. Both are strong pocket passers who are excellent in reading defenses and making their reads. The clean mechanics of all three can be tied together, alongside the accurate ball. None have also been praised for their arm strength in comparison to names like Aaron Rodgers. I like the Romo comparison here, although his name value tends to be mixed depending on who you ask.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 8 – Progresses through reads well and doesn’t lock onto one receiver
Accuracy: 9 – Completed over 70% of his passes, showed excellent touch on mid to deep
Arm Strength: 7 – Not as strong as some of the quarterbacks in his class
Pocket Presence:8 – Good movement within the pocket, can sense pressure.
Mechanics: 7 – Can be a bit flat footed at times on throws, but nothing major here.
Mobility: 7 – Burrow has above average mobility inside & outside of the pocket.


By: Jason Guilbault @jguilbault11

Chase Young
2
Chase Young
Ohio State, Junior, #1 EDGE, Pick #2
20 yrs | 6’5″ | 265 lbs
IQ
Physical
Pass Cover
Tackling
Run Def
Strength
GP
34
Tackles
98
Sacks
30.5
FF
9
FR
0

Last season, NFL scouts didn’t think that any edge rusher could be more dominant than Nick Bosa. In fact, many college football analysts were skeptical that Ohio State’s defense could bounce back from the loss of Nick Bosa. However, Chase Young was able to emerge as one of the best pass rushing prospects of the decade because of his insane combination of quickness and strength. As the 2020 NFL Draft approaches, Young is certainly the second-best prospect, and will definitely be drafted in the top five.

Strengths

•   Pass rush
•   Finesse moves
•   Timing of the snap
•   Play recognition
•   Strength
•   Speed

Many NFL scouts believe that Chase Young is one of the best pass-rushing prospects of the 2010-2020 decade. Young’s ability to time snaps is rare and exceptional. Due to his timing, Young is remarkably quicker than the majority of the linemen he lines up against and is able to brush past them on the edge with finesse moves. Even when an OL perfectly times a snap, Young has way more tenacity for them to block him. In fact, his motor is so incredible that he knocks past offensive tackles and even some double teams in order to get to the quarterback. Young doesn’t always have to use a finesse or power move when he’s on the edge because his combination of strength and quickness allows him to just run past OL. Consequently, he repeatedly sheds blocks and runs toward his target. On run plays, Young showcases his high football IQ by remaining disciplined and keeping contain. The best attribute about Young is the fact that he is consistently a pain for offensive linemen, quarterbacks, and coordinators.

Weaknesses

•   Tackling Technique
•   Pad level too high
•   Coverage

Even though Young is a tremendous edge rusher, he still has areas where he needs to improve. For instance, Young’s pad level is often too low when he engages in power moves. If Young gets his pad level lower, then he’ll have more acceleration, and push OL back further with power moves. Speaking of technique, Young also needs to refine his tackling technique because he often grabs players too high. As a result, he has a slight tendency to not fully grasp quarterbacks, like Trevor Lawrence, who are able to shrug him off occasionally. Another area for Young to improve is his pursuit because he shows noticeably less effort if the play isn’t directly near him.

College Production:

2019 stats – GP: 12, Tackles: 46, Sacks: 16.5, FF: 7, FR: 0
Overall stats – GP: 34, Tackles: 98, Sacks: 30.5, FF: 9, FR: 0

Over his last two seasons, Chase Young’s input has potentially skyrocketed. During the 2019-2020 season, Young led all college football defenders in sacks, even though he was suspended for two games due to a loan discrepancy. Throughout his career, Young has been able to obliterate offensive linemen and harass quarterbacks in the backfield.

Best Landing Spot

The best landing spot for Chase Young would be the Washington Redskins because of Ron Rivera’s 4-3 scheme. The best thing for Chase Young would be for him to stay as a 4-3 defensive end who is solely responsible for run stopping and pass rushing. Especially since Rivera’s scheme emphasizes aggressiveness on passing plays and keeping contain on running plays, Young would be suited quite well opposite from Montez Sweat or Johnathan Allen.

Worst Landing Spot

While this scenario would be almost impossible, the worst place for Young to end up is in Miami with the Dolphins. As of 2019, the Miami Dolphins currently run a 3-4 scheme, which would limit Young’s upside. Throughout Young’s tenure at OSU, he played in a 4-3 scheme where he was able to be aggressive against the pass. Despite his edge rushing skills, Young isn’t quite fast enough to drop back in coverage on passing plays in a 3-4 system.

Draft Range

Within the top three/five picks.

NFL Comparison

Chase Young’s combination of speed and power is most similar to Julius Peppers. Most scouts believe that Young will be able to generate pressure in the same way that Peppers did when he was in the NFL. Especially if Chase Young plays in Ron Rivera’s 4-3 scheme, he will be able to wreak havoc on opposing offensive lines.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Young has tremendous play recognition
Athleticism: 9 – his athleticism helps him shed blocks and get into the backfield quickly
Mechanics: 6.5 – needs to refine tackling form and work on pad level
Pass Rush: 9 – gets pressures on a consistent basis
Run Def: 7 – is great at keeping contain because he’s disciplined on run plays
Strength: 9 – uses his strength to obliterate offensive linemen and to tackle RBs and QBs


By: Myles Whitmore @MylesWhitmore

Jeffrey Okudah
3
Jeffrey Okudah
Ohio State, Junior, #1 CB, Pick #3
20 yrs | 6’1″ | 220 lbs
IQ
8
Speed
7.5
Agility
8
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
6
Tackles
7
GP
35
Tackles
83
Sack
0
FF
1
FR
2
INT
3

Strengths

•   Man coverage
    •   Especially deep man coverage
•   Run Support
•   Play recognition
•   Versatility
•   Footwork
•   Agility

You won’t be able to find a better man coverage cornerback in the 2020 draft class than Jeff Okudah. When Okudah is going against receivers on the outside, he is able to use his quickness, speed, and footwork to stay step for step with them on deep routes. Even if a wideout catches the ball, Okudah’s aggressive play style allows him to force the ball out of the receivers hands. One of the most underrated attributes about Okudah is his ability as a run stopper. Due to his insane combination of play recognition and physicality, he is able to consistently find the ball and be in a position to make a tackle. Another underrated attribute is the fact that Okudah can actually play some safety if necessary.

Weaknesses

•   Slant/Drag route coverage
•   Zone spacing
•   Recovery

While Okduah is an excellent man coverage corner, he struggles against slant, hitch and drag routes the most. This is especially true when Okudah is in zone coverage, where he still needs to develop as a defensive back. Moreover, Okudah struggles to recover at times when he is in coverage if he gets beat on a route. If Okudah’s team is going against a physical WR who excels at slant and drag routes, like Michael Thomas, it would be detrimental for Okudah to cover him.

College Production:

2019 stats – GP: 13, Tackles: 34, Sacks: 0, FF: 1, FR: 0, INTs: 3
Overall stats – GP: 35, Tackles: 83, Sacks: 0, FF: 1, FR: 2, INTs: 3

Best Landing Spot

Jeffery Okudah would be a perfect fit for the Detroit Lions because he is an excellent man corner. Last season, the Lions were among the league leaders in terms of playing man coverage. However, the Lions desperately need to draft a quality man coverage cornerback considering the fact that they surrendered the most passing yards in the NFL last season. Okudah’s aggressiveness would help out Darius Slay on the outside, and be greatly coveted by Lions coach Matt Patricia.

Worst Landing Spot

Jeffery Okudah would have a difficult time playing for the Washington Redskins because their head coach, Ron Rivera, loves to use zone coverage. Throughout his tenure as the Carolina Panthers’ head coach, Rivera used zone coverage more than any other team in the NFL. Given that Okudah still needs to work on his spacing and reaction time in zone coverage, it would be optimal for him to be eased into zone coverage rather than fully inserted into a mostly zone system.

Draft Range

Early First Round

NFL Comparison

Jeffery Okudah’s combination of speed and man coverage skills have drawn parallels to Marshon Lattimore. I believe that this comparison is accurate because Okudah has the ability to step in on day one and take over as a starting CB. However similar to Marshon Lattimore, Okudah needs to improve at covering against short routes and zone coverage. If Okudah puts in the work and is placed in the right system, his ceiling could be as high as Patrick Peterson and Jalen Ramsey because of Okudah’s skill against deep routes.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – knows how to read plays well and reacts well
Speed: 7.5 – speed helps him stay step for step with wide receivers
Agility: 8 – can change directions quickly and moves his hips fluidly
Man coverage: 8 – best man coverage corner in college, especially on deep plays
Zone Coverage: 6 – needs to work on spacing in zone coverage
Tackling: 7 – has great tackling form and is a great run stopper


By: Myles Whitmore @MylesWhitmore

Andrew Thomas
4
Andrew Thomas
Georgia, Junior, #1 OL, Pick #9
21 yrs | 6’5″ | 320 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
7
Mechanics
8
Pass Blk
7
Run Blk
9
Strength
8

Teams can always use a solid offensive lineman, and Andrew Thomas out of Georgia is just that. He was a three year starter at Georgia, and had a productive few seasons. Thomas is entering the draft as a top 15 pick, and if this class wasn’t so offensive heavy, Thomas would likely be going higher in the draft. Thomas worked in a pro-ready Georgia offense and had a big strength as a run blocker. Thomas will be turning 21 before the draft, and is already a top draft prospect. He has room for growth, especially in pass protection, which isn’t a knock against him. We look back at the Bulldog offenses over the last decade, and they have built top offensive lines year after year, to go along with great run games. There are a handful of teams within the first 15 picks that need an offensive tackle. Thomas will likely be first off the board, looking towards the back half of the first ten picks.

Strengths

•   Run Blocking
•   Strength
•   IQ

Weaknesses

•   Blocking In Space
•   Footwork

There is a big reason for why Georgia’s rushing attack has been so strong, outside of the NFL talented backs. Andrew Thomas and some other names had an excellent season. It was a pro style offense where Thomas began to emerge as a top pick in the upcoming draft. He is an excellent run blocker, and is athletic for his build. If we are going to look at some negatives, there is room for growth in terms of his footwork, and also blocking in space. His pass protection was solid, but not quite at the level of running. He struggled a bit against quicker defensive lineman, which is where the footwork failed him at times.

College Production

Andrew Thomas has been starting since his freshman year, and went up against some strong defensive lineman throughout his three seasons. While we can talk about the dropoff in SEC defenses of late, their pass-rushers have still been noteworthy. Georgia’s offenses over the past three years have been tremendous, and having a strong offensive lineman is a big plus. That was the case here with Thomas.

Best Landing Spot

There are quite a few spots where Andrew Thomas can land, and it will shakeout depending on if a few teams bite on Jerry Jeudy instead. The Giants should be looking to boast their offensive line, as would Arizona and Cleveland. In terms of these teams, they are better suited for the future in comparison to teams like the Jets. Thomas can come in and make an instant impact to help the offensive line, which would provide a lift for the players around him.

Worst Landing Spot

The Jets are another team that desperately needs to upgrade their offensive line, and Andrew Thomas would do that immediately. They struggled to run the ball, and Thomas excels in opening up lanes for his running backs. The problem with landing on the Jets is that they still are a mess with Adam Gase at the helm, and a roster that you are not sure who will be there moving forward. In comparison to other teams around them, the Jets do not have a big picture plan it seems.

Draft Range

Top 15

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Worked in a pro system, and his awareness is one of his best traits.
Physical: 7 – Moves well for his size, but speedy edge rushers can get to him.
Mechanics: 8 – Has tremendous hands and balance, but footwork in the pass game is a bit average.
Pass Blocking: 7 – Deeper drop backs is where Thomas can struggle, but he is still above average.
Run Blocking: 9 – Thomas is one of the top run blockers in the draft.
Strength: 8 – He has excellent strength and moves bodies off the ball in the run game.


By: Jason Guilbault @jguilbault11

Tua Tagovailoa
5
Tua Tagovailoa
Alabama, Junior, #2 QB, Pick #5
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 219 lbs
Vision
9
Accuracy
10
Arm
8
Pocket IQ
10
Mechanics
8
Mobility
8
GP
32
COMP%
69.3%
PASS YDS
7,442
PASS TD
87
INT
11
RTG
199.4

Tua Tagovoila has made it official. He will be in this year’s NFL draft. After an up-and-down, injury-ridden career at Alabama, Tua will hope to become the franchise quarterback that many believe he can in the NFL. He certainly has the tools to make this happen. Despite questions surrounding his durability, his ability and skills translate well to the next level. He does not have the height or stature of a Trevor Lawrence or Joe Burrow. Yet, his accuracy inside and out of the pocket are elite. He has plenty enough arm strength and we have seen several QBs thrive at his height and shorter. Tua has shown his ability to torch SEC-level defenses and be extremely accurate and precise while doing so. Last season as a sophomore, he threw for nearly 4,000 yards with 43 TDs and only 6 Ints. He missed games from injury this year, but followed up with a 33 TD 3 Int season. He certainly has the ability to raise his level of play when it matters most, bringing the tide back as a freshman to capture the 2018 title. In LSU’s lone chance of actually being defeated this year, Alabama fell short 46-41. Tua went for 418 yards, 4 TDs, and 1 Int. His command of the offense has been unparalleled in his three years at Alabama. Alabama has been known for having game-managing quarterbacks throughout their dynasty. Let’s be honest: the likes of Greg Mcelroy, AJ McCarron, Jake Coker, Blake Sims, and even Jalen Hurts were never on the level that Tagovailoa was at the collegiate level. Tua has the intangibles, skillset, and IQ to be Russel Wilsonesque in the NFL.

Strengths

•   Vision
•   Accuracy
•   Arm Strength
•   Pocket Presence
•   Mechanics
•   Mobility

Weaknesses

•   Durability

Tua does not have any glaring weaknesses across the board. His vision and accuracy is elite, especially for short to intermediate-level throws. That is especially beneficial in today’s NFL. His precision and ability to get the ball out quickly can make him a 3rd down machine. Tua may not have Matt Stafford arm strength, but has plenty enough and is very accurate when going deep. He is terrific navigating the pocket and is balanced with his footwork in the pocket. Tua understands coverage rotation well, although he may underestimate his need to audible based on coverage at times. He knows how to utilize the strengths of his receivers extremely well, whether their best quality is speed, physicality, or leaping ability. Tua has an uncanny ability to escape sacks while not doing too much. If he can find better ways to protect himself inside and out of the pocket, durability should not be an issue. His build is pretty solid already, so more added strength would prevent future injuries. Tua does have a slight hitch, but his overall mechanics are good for a young quarterback coming out of college. His confidence and command of the offense is not normal for someone his age, and he has been this way throughout his entire college career. As competitive as there is, Tua’s injury history at Alabama should not offset him the way many believe.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 9, COMP%: 71.4, PASS YDS: 2,840 yds, PASS TDs: 33, INTs: 3, RTG: 206.9
Overall stats – GP: 32, COMP%: 69.3, PASS YDS: 7,442 yds,PASS TDs: 87, INTs: 11, RTG: 199.4

His confidence, will to win, big play ability, and consistency make him a top 3 quarterback prospect when healthy. His potential is out the roof considering just how deadly he can be in and outside the pocket.

Best Landing Spot

Teams with speedy wideouts that model Alabama would be the perfect fit for Tua. Yet and still, the most important trait is a team with a good offensive line. It is essential that the young quarterback coming off injury goes to a team that is also beefing up their O-line. This would include a team like the Colts. Other great spots for Tua include teams with an already established run-game. The Panthers and Chargers would be good fits for this reason.

Worst Landing Spot

While many mock drafts have Tua possibly going to the Dolphins, this would not be good for his immediate health and success. The offensive line is an issue and the run game is non-existent. Other teams that would not bode well for Tua include the Falcons and Bengals.

Draft Range

Early-mid 1st round

NFL Comparison

One common NFL comparison for Tua has been Russel Wilson. As a left-hander, Tua is unorthodox given his skillset and many NFL defenses may struggle to adjust. In terms of style of play and his ceiling, Drew Brees comes to mind. Not very gifted physically, but similar body types with an emphasis on accuracy and precision.

Ratings Breakdown

Vision: 9
Accuracy: 10
Arm Strength: 8
Pocket Presence: 10
Mechanics: 8
Mobility: 8
IQ: 9


By: Maury Jackson

Isaiah Simmons
6
Isaiah Simmons
LB, Junior, #1 S, Pick #4
21 yrs | 6’4″ | 230 lbs
IQ
9
Physical
9
Pass Cover
10
Tackling
9
Run Def
8
Strength
8
TACKLES
128
SACKS
11
FF
6
FR
1
INT
3

Outside of Chase Young, Isaiah Simmons is one of the top defensive prospects in the draft. He should be headed for a top five pick, although a slight change in a pick could change everything. Simmons lined up all over the field, playing mostly linebacker but also played at the safety level at times. Simmons moves well all over the field, and is extremely athletic. He had over 100 tackles in this past season, and eight sacks to go with it. Simmons athleticism helps him in pass coverage, and it is hard to find a negative about it. He is going to be a game changer for any team that drafts him, and will be an instant help. Any team should be looking to get him rather they need him or not.

Strengths

•   IQ
•   Athleticism
•   Pass Coverage
•   Speed
•   Pass Rush
•   Tackling

Weaknesses

•   Shedding Blocks

It is hard to find a negative here, and shedding blocks isn’t even a massive weakness. In comparison to the rest of his strengths, he could stand to improve in this area. Simmons is all over the field with his speed, and he is excellent in pass coverage which is big given how the NFL is now. He also is an excellent pass rusher and open field tackler. About every aspect of the game, Simmons excels in. Simmons has excellent IQ, knowing where the ball is going and also taking efficient routes to the ball or ball carrier. His size and speed make him a dangerous threat in all areas of the game. There isn’t a linebacker who can match him in this draft class, especially in pass coverage.

College Production

2019 stats – 104, tackles, 8 sacks, 1 INT, 3 FF, 0 FR
Overall stats – 238 tackles, 11 sacks, 3 INT, 1 FR, 6 FF

Clemson’s success has also come from the defensive side, which has been big in draft classes over the last few years. In 2019 he had a standout year with over 100 tackles, and showed the ability to get to the quarterback. His pass coverage skills were strong, and Clemson moved him around all over the place.

Best Landing Spot

The New York Giants are in desperate need of a defensive playmaker like Isaiah Simmons, and this is where he could land. He is going to jump into any defense and be an instant starter. New York is in search of a key linebacker to build around and this would be a start. Out of the teams likely to take him, New York at least is in better shape moving forward.

Worst Landing Spot

There really isn’t a bad landing spot for Simmons for the sake of his playing time. If you want to look at a team where they are in not great of shape, we could say Miami if they decided to make shock pick, where Tua Tagovailoa is projected to go. Although the Dolphins have several draft picks to start gearing for the future.

Draft Range

Top Ten

NFL Comparison

It is hard to narrow down a comparison for Isaiah Thomas because he is just a freak athlete and does so many things well. He is a hybrid linebacker, but has played all over the field. Simmons has lined up in the secondary, linebacker, and as an edge rusher as well. He might set a bar where we start comparing other prospects to him.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9 – Part of his elite playmaking ability is his awareness and IQ.
Physical: 9 – Top end speed for the position and can play all over
Pass Coverage: 10 – He is the top pass coverage linebacker in the draft.
Tackling: 9 – Simmons is great in the open field and wraps up everyone in sight.
Run Defense: 8 – Like everything else he is great at reading plays and wraps up if they get to second level.
Strength: 8 – Simmons is a big time hitter and is a big presence on the field.


By: Jason Guilbault @jguilbault11

Grant Delpit
7
Grant Delpit
LSU, Junior, #2 S, Pick #14
21 yrs | 6’3″ | 203 lbs
IQ
9
Speed
8
Agility
8
Man CVGE
8
Zone CVGE
9
Tackles
6
TACKLES
120%
SACKS
7
FF
2
FR
2
INT
8

Grant Delpit was the heart and soul of the 2019 DBU season. He was a huge contributing factor in their success on defense, and in LSU’s college football playoff run. Delpit has a high motor which makes him one of the best safeties going into the NFL Draft. One of his best traits is his IQ. Delpit understands what’s going on from pre-snap reads, to understanding what the offense is doing mid-play. Along with his speed and athleticism, this makes his future look promising with understanding where to be one the field at all times.

Strengths

•   IQ
•   Agility
•   Coverage

Delpit really is the complete package at safety. His speed and athleticism help keep up with any receiver. He also has the size where he won’t get pushed around by anybody either. Also, Delpit understands the game better than anyone in college. He knows where he needs to be at all times on the field and doesn’t allow much success when receivers are in his area.

Weaknesses

•   Tackling

There really isn’t much to pick apart in Delpit’s game. One of the few weak points is his tackling. Overall, he is a good tackler but he is susceptible to getting lazy and going for arm tackles only.

College Production

2019 stats – 38 tackles, 2 sacks, 1 forced fumbles, 1 fumble recoveries, 2 interceptions
Overall stats – 120 tackles, 7 sacks, 2 forced fumbles, 2 fumbles recoveries, 8 interceptions

Best Landing Spot

Tampa Bay or Indianapolis would be the best fit for him given where they are drafted. Both need help defensively. Given the divisions both teams are in, they need help with opponents passing attacks. If he falls slightly then Dallas wouldn’t be a terrible spot for Delpit either.

Worst Landing Spot

Somewhere in the second round. This is hard to see happen, but LSU’s secondary was picked apart earlier this season. If teams believe Delpit was apart of the teams’ struggles, then he could see his draft stock fall.

Draft Range

Mid 1st Round

Delpit should be one of the first safeties off the board if not the first one drafted. Expect him to go somewhere between 14-22.

NFL Comparison

Jamal Adams

Delpit has the same centerfield range the Jamal Adams has. Both are very cerebral players that understand how teams are trying to pass the ball, so they are able to defend at will. Size and athleticism are about the same as well.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 9 – Understands defenses and pre-snap reads very well
Speed: 8 – He isn’t letting anyone get passed him
Agility: 8 – His athleticism helps him make the plays in the secondary
Man Coverage: 8 – Not as much work here but man coverage is still strong
Zone Coverage: 9 – One of the best zone coverage safeties in college
Tackles: 6 – Arm tackles aren’t going to get it done in the NFL


By: Nick Wojcik @DePaulWoj

Jerry Jeudy
8
Jerry Jeudy
Alabama, Junior, #1 WR, Pick #8
21 yrs | 6’1″ | 191 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
9
Agility
9
Speed
8
Blocking
5
Size
6
GP
36
REC
159
REC YDS
2,742
TD
26
YDS/REC
17.2

Jerry Jeudy will look to become the latest wide receiver out of Alabama to be drafted in the first round, as we have seen quite a few over recent years with Amari Cooper and Calvin Ridley being drafted. Jeudy was part of an electric passing attack at Alabama, going for 24 touchdowns and over 2,100 receiving yards in his final two seasons. He is incredibly fast, and teams will be looking at him in the first round, especially those in need of a major playmaker. Both him and CeeDee Lamb are neck and neck in terms of the top wideout in this draft class, and both are headed for top 20 picks. He excels in athleticism and is an excellent route runner. He isn’t the most physical wideout, but is a force in the open field. There are several teams looking to upgrade their receiving core, and Jeudy will do just that.

Strengths

•   Route Running
•   IQ
•   Speed & Acceleration
•   Agility
•   Yards After Catch

Weaknesses

•   Dropped Passes
•   50/50 Balls
•   Matching Up Against Physical Corners

There are not too many weaknesses in Jerry Jeudy’s game. He is one of the top route runners in the draft, especially in short yardage routes. This also helps him create chances to explode into the open field with his acceleration and speed. Because he isn’t a big and physical wideout, he can struggle with press coverage from more physical corners. However he also stands the chance to use that speed and get by as well. Jeudy won’t make a ton of 50/50 plays, but is good at getting the ball in the air in open space. The one slight knock on him is that he tends to lose concentration at times, which results in some frustrating drops.

College Production

2019 stats – 13 GP, 77 receptions, 1,163 receiving yards, 15.1 YPR, 10 TD
Overall stats – 36 GP, 159 receptions, 2,742 receiving yards, 17.2 YPR, 26 TD

Playing with Tua and a few other strong wideout candidates, he asserted himself at Alabama. He was a big time playmaker, and averaged over 15 yards per reception in his final season, and over 17 in his college career. Jeudy’s production should follow him into the pros. Both him and Devonta Smith had over 1,000 yards and double digit touchdowns, although Jeudy is viewed as the better prospect.

Best Landing Spot

Arizona would be a fun spot for Jerry Jeudy, although they do have a few other needs as well. Pairing him with Kyler Murray would be instant success for both sides. Ultimately we need to look at who would be throwing to him, and then the coaches as well. Even with Larry Fitzgerald returning, Arizona still needs that deep threat option. This would give Arizona a solid aerial attack.

Worst Landing Spot

Jacksonville is by far the worst landing spot for any of the top wideouts. The quarterback situation is not ideal, even with Nick Foles and his huge contract there. Gardner Minshew was fun for a few weeks, but this team is not suited for a wide receiver to have instant success. Get Jeudy to one of the younger upcoming quarterbacks instead.

Draft Range

Top 15

NFL Comparison

There are plenty of comparisons to Odell Beckham out there, given his speed in the open field and burst on crossing routes. We can see that resemblance. However, after watching Chris Godwin this past season, Jeudy is slightly smaller but shows that burst that Godwin had after the catch. I would throw him in between both of these names, especially in terms of their hands.

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 9 – Very good speed and acceleration off the line and open field.
Agility: 9 – His feet are incredible, and he has everything to be an elite playmaker at the next level.
Routes: 9 – Both him and Lamb are the top route runners in the draft.
Hands: 8 – Will have some drops, but nothing major
Blocking: 5 – Wasn’t asked to do a ton of blocking, but average at best.
Size: 6 – Not overly tall or a physical presence, but athleticism makes up for it.


By: Jason Guilbault @jguilbault11

A.J. Epenesa
9
A.J. Epenesa
Iowa, Junior, #2 EDGE, Pick #13
21 yrs | 6’6″ | 280 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
6.5
Mechanics
8
Pass Rush
8
Run Def
8.5
Strength
9
GP
37
Tackles
101
Sack
26.5
FF
9
FR
1
TFLs
36

After a very solid 10.5 sack year as a Sophomore, A.J. Epenesa started to climb up 2020 draft boards. Now after another impressive year, Epenesa is slotted to be the second EDGE player off the board only behind arguable the best prospect in the draft, Chase Young. Epenesa helped lead the Iowa Hawkeyes to a 10-win season in 2019 and a bowl win. He has arguably a more complete skillset than Chase Young to go along with a high ceiling.

Strengths

•   Extremely strong, especially at point of contact
•   Elite bull rush and push/pull moves
•   Great frame and length
•   Versatility
•   Technique

There is a lot to like about A.J. Epenesa’s complete skillset. As you could assume by his 6’6’’, 280lb frame Epenesa is very strong and uses his length very well. There is no doubt that Epenesa is the best power rusher out of this group of EDGE players. He has strong hands and uses power/bull rush moves effectively. Does a great job of striking tackles with his hands and is very frustrating to move off of the ball. He has shown good gap control as well as containment as an edge defender. Epenesa displays versatility in multiple ways. He is an impact player in the rush and passing game. Epenesa was mainly a 5-technique at Iowa but has all the tools to play on the outside as well as the interior in certain situations at the next level. He displayed the ability to work out of both 3- and 4-point stances on a consistent basis. There may be some concern about his pure speed and athleticism, but his strength and advanced technique to beat blockers on a regular basis.

Weaknesses

•   Lacks elite speed and athleticism
•   Lateral quickness
•   Needs to diversify pass rush moves

Unlike Chase Young, Epenesa is not the type of electric athlete on the line of scrimmage. He has solid get up off the ball, but that’s not how he is going to beat you. I don’t want to nit-pick Epenesa too much for his athleticism because he is able to be impactful through his power and technique. There is some worry about his lateral quickness. At times Epenesa can lack explosiveness when working down the line of scrimmage to make a play. As good of a pass-rusher he is there is still some work to be done. Epenesa changes speeds well to make up for the lack of elite explosiveness, but needs to add more moves to his arsenal. He started to diversify his pass-rush moves this year and will need to continue to do so. Lastly, he has an elite frame, but it is worth noting that he will need to work to keep that pad level consistently low.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 13, Tackles: 49, Sacks: 11.5, FF: 4, FR: 0, TFLs: 14
Overall stats – GP: 37, Tackles: 101, Sacks: 26.5, FF: 9, FR: 1, TFLs: 36

A.J. Epenesa was able to produce throughout his 3-year career, but his last two have been dominant. Epenesa put up 22 sacks and 30.5 tackles for a loss over his Sophomore and Junior years. He was the most impactful player on Iowa and did so in a BIG 10 conference with some very impressive offensive lines.

Best Landing Spot

Epenesa is made for 4-3 system in which he can predominantly play the 5-technique, but also move around to the interior in certain situations. On a good note every team in the 9-15 range runs a 4-3 base defense other than the Jets and Broncos. Of those 4-3 teams I view the Indianapolis Colts as a great fit. Being drafted by the Colts would allow Epenesa to come into a scheme that fits him and make an impact immediately. It also wouldn’t hurt him to pick the brain of Justin Houston and add some more pass-rush moves to his repertoire.

Worst Landing Spot

In my opinion the worst landing sport for Epenesa would either be the Jets or Broncos. Now this isn’t to say he couldn’t excel there because he has the talent to be successful anywhere. These teams don’t fit Epenesa as well because of their 3-4 defenses. He would be less valuable in a 3-4 front because he isn’t the type of player to pass-rush from a 2-point stance. He would be forced to play more interior which I believe he would still make an impact at, but profiles best as a 5-technique.

Draft Range

Picks 9-15

NFL Comparison

Derek Wolfe

Now this is a comparison of skillset not the type of success at the next level. Wolfe and Epenesa both have similar frames and all-around skillsets as defensive ends. Ironically, Wolfe has played his entire career with a team that I mentioned as a bad landing spot for Epenesa. Wolfe has been forced to play more interior d-line than I would like. I think that Wolfe, like Epenesa, would have benefitted from being able to play defensive end in a 4-3 system.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8, good play recognition but still has some room for block rec improvement
Athleticism: 6.5, not an elite speed/athleticism guy
Mechanics: 8, good technique and frames
Pass rush: 8, great power rusher, but needs more versatility
Run Defense: 8.5, great gap control, main flaw is lateral quickness
Strength: 9, extremely strong and powerful


By: Nick Kallas @NickKallas3

CeeDee Lamb
10
CeeDee Lamb
Oklahoma, Junior, #2 WR, Pick #12
20 yrs | 6’2″ | 191 lbs
Hands
9
Routes
9
Agility
8
Speed
7
Blocking
8
Size
7.5
GP
40
REC
173
REC YDS
3292
TD

32

YDS/REC
19

Ceedee Lamb is our number two ranked wide receiver but is not far behind Jerry Jeudy and you could even make the argument that he should be ranked higher than Jeudy. Lamb has been a contributor for Oklahoma since he was a Freshman in 2017 but really burst onto the scene in 2018. He played with a different quarterback each of his three seasons in Norman (going for Baker Mayfield to Kyler Murray and then Jalen Hurts) and showed elite talent with all of them.

Strengths

•   Hands
•   Body Control
•   Ball Skills
•   IQ

Lamb is not the type of receiver to blow you away with his physical attributes, but he has elite skills. Many rave about Ceedee Lamb’s fantastic body control and an elite nose for tracking the ball. This is what makes him such a threat downfield despite his lack of top tier breakaway speed. His hands put together with his phenomenal ball skills give Lamb a combination that can truly help a quarterback. Lamb often makes in-air adjustments to track down passes both in and out of traffic and can play through contract even with his slimmer frame. Lamb’s route running, change of speed through routes, and craftiness allows him to get great separation.

Weaknesses

•   Lacks top level speed
•   Slimmer frame

The main weakness you will see associated with CeeDee Lamb is his lack of elite speed. He is still able to get separation due to his craftiness and route running but he doesn’t have the type of beat you of the ball speed that is associated with top receivers. He is also going to have to adjust to an increase level of DBs going from the offensive heavy BIG 12 to the NFL but I believe he will be able to transition well. Some may be weary of his skinnier frame but didn’t miss a game at Oklahoma and does a lot of his damage closer to the sidelines.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 13, REC: 62, REC YDS: 1327, TDs: 14, YDS/REC: 21.4
Overall stats – GP: 40, REC: 173, REC YDS: 3292, TDs: 32, YDS/REC: 19

Lamb has arguably been college football’s most productive receiver over the last three seasons. He started his career fast breaking Oklahoma’s freshman receiving record with 807 yards and followed it up with back to back seasons of 60+ receptions, 1100+ yards, and 11+ TDs. Lamb has also shown the ability to return punts, leading the Big 12 in punt return yards (218) and was second in 2019 (179).

Best Landing Spot

CeeDee Lamb is looking like he will land in or near the top 10 of the 1st round and will be asked to make an impact at the next level right away. I believe that the best possible landing spot for Lamb would be the Arizona Cardinals. This would give him the opportunity to once again play with his former college teammate Kyler Murray and rekindle some of that chemistry that they showed at Oklahoma. It would also give Lamb the potential opportunity to learn from a similar type of receiver and one of the best ever if Larry Fitzgerald decides to play again.

Worst Landing Spot

Lamb should make an impact wherever he ends up getting drafted to but two specific spots that could deter some production would be the Jets and Broncos. This is due to the fact that neither team has an established quarterback and wouldn’t exactly be inserting Lamb into deep receiving corps.

Draft Range

Picks 7-13

NFL Comparison

Allen Robinson

Ratings Breakdown

Speed: 7 – Doesn’t have the top straight away speed
Agility: 8 – good not great athlete
Routes: 9 – great route running and deception
Hands: 9 – very strong hands
Blocking: 8 – good positional blocker
Size: 7.5 – Has good height but might need to bulk up a little
Separation: 8 – creates separation with good releases and craftiness
IQ: 9 – smart and makes good adjustments


By: Nick Kallas @NickKallas3

Derrick Brown
11
Derrick Brown
Auburn, Senior, #1 DL, Pick #7
21 yrs | 6’5″ | 318 lbs
IQ
8
Physical
9
Mechanics
8
Pass Rush
7
Run Def
9
Strength
9
GP
46
Tackles
170
Sack
12.5
FF
5
FR
4

Derrick Brown is headed for a top ten pick, and anything after the first five picks is going to be a steal for whichever team grabs him. Brown is a disruptive defensive tackle who is going to make an instant impact at the next level. Brown had the chance to leave last year for the draft, and was projected to go first round. He finished his senior year at Auburn, and had another productive year. If you are going to solely look at his stats, you may not be impressed, but he is someone who makes a ton of plays in the backfield and helps others get pressure on the quarterback. Brown’s run defense is exceptional, and there are quite a few teams that will have him circled to help in that department. His size helps plug up gaps, and Brown’s athleticism helps him get in the backfield before opposing offenses even realize it. He endured a ton of double teams, and got the Aaron Donald treatment in most games. Brown will be able to adapt into a 3-4 or 4-3 offense, but would work a bit better in a 4-3 offense. While he won’t be the top defensive player off the board, he is one of the top three prospects on the defensive side and will be a force to be reckoned with for a long time in this league. He will easily be the first defensive tackle off the board, and second defensive lineman behind Chase Young.

Strengths

•   Run Defense
•   Pressuring QB
•   High Motor
•   Strength
•   Mechanics

Weaknesses

•   None

Derrick Brown has no glaring weaknesses, and his upside at the next level is high. He is about as safe as you can get from a floor standpoint as well. Brown’s size and athleticism is unmatched in this draft, and is a smart defender as well. He has a high motor and will work to find the ball at a high rate. His run defense is going to make an instant impact at the next level, and he will help his line-mates as well. Brown has excellent hands, and while he could add another pass rush move or two, his ability to get to the quarterback when not being double-teamed is there.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 12, Tackles: 54, Sacks: 4.5, FF: 2, FR: 2
Overall stats – GP: 46, Tackles: 170, Sacks: 12.5, FF: 5, FR: 4

While returning to Auburn for his final season was a bit of a surprise, he came back and caused havoc in the backfield. He had over 50 tackles, with 12 of them going for loss in 2019. He had 8.5 sacks over his final two seasons, and saw a ton of double teams. Brown handled them well, and went up against some strong SEC lineman over his final two seasons. His numbers won’t pop off, but his athleticism and size are a big problem for opposing offenses.

Best Landing Spot

Carolina has the 7th overall pick, and this is where Brown should be going. However, the Chargers would be smart to take him and help free up their edge rushers a bit. The Panthers struggled against the run last season, and Brown would slide right into a starting role. That would be the case wherever he goes.

Worst Landing Spot

There is really no bad spot for Brown, because he is going to go top ten, and find himself on a team that will plug him right away. I like the Chargers/Panthers spot the best for him, as it is unlikely he will slide to Jacksonville who is in line for a defensive tackle as well. The Panthers and Chargers would be places I’d rather play in comparison to Jacksonville.

Draft Range

Top 10

NFL Comparison

Ndamukong Suh is the name that comes to mind as a big time playmaking defensive tackle who causes major issues plugging up the line. Suh was a top three pick back in 2010, going second to the Lions. Brown is more disciplined, which was always the knock against Suh, yet still keeps that same motor. Brown is going to have a similar impact like Suh in the NFL.

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 8 – Ability to line up in a few spots, and does extremely well at reading plays.
Athleticism: 9 – Absolute monster for his size, and freakishly quick.
Run Defense: 9 – His best feature is his run defense, where he plugs up gaps quick and will wrap up.
Pass Rush: 7 – Can get to the quarterback, it’s just opposing offenses made sure that he absolutely didn’t.
Tackling: 8 – Wraps up well in the run game, and will chase down ball carriers.
Strength: 9 – Gave offensive lines trouble even in double teams, and has top end strength.


By: Maury Jackson

Javon Kinlaw
12
Javon Kinlaw
South Carolina, Senior, #2 DL, Pick #16
22 yrs | 6’6″ | 310 lbs
IQ
6
Physical
8
Mechanics
9
Pass Rush
9
Run Def
8
Strength
9
GP
29
Tackles
82
Sack
10
FF
3
FR
4

Javon Kinlaw comes into the NFL draft as the second best interior defensive lineman behind Auburn’s Derrick Brown. Kinlaw had an impressive 2019 season, and played his way into potentially becoming a first-round pick. Despite the Gamecocks finishing 4-8 on the season, he was one of the focal points on defense, and kept South Carolina in some games because of the havoc he created on the line of scrimmage. Kinlaw finished in the SEC tied for ninth in sacks. His strength and athleticism will help an NFL team limit an opponents rushing attack by taking on double teams, and get into an opponents backfield. His 6’6″, 310 pound size makes him impossible to miss on the field.

Strengths

•   Strength
•   Run Defense
•   Athleticism
•   Tackling

Kinlaw is arguably one of the strongest players in the draft. For someone that sits at his size, it has been difficult for SEC opponents to push him around. His pure strength is going to help him at the next level. Also, he is very athletic for his size. This makes him even more difficult to block at his size and having the ability to move the way he does. Kinlaw can shoot through gaps and disrupt an offense just by beating lineman off the ball. His length and technique help him stay within the play every snap. Also, he has a high motor and will chase down ball carriers if he needs too.

Weaknesses

•   IQ
•   Double teams

He could work on the mental side of his position more. At times, he does seem to struggle with understanding what the offense is giving him. Kinlaw can find himself taken out of the play by his own doing. He struggles with taking on double teams at times, which can lead to horrible technique and take him away from the play. He does struggle to keep his pad level low at times as well. From a physical standpoint, there isn’t a negative trait that he possess. There are times where he lacks mental focus and technique, which is where his downfall can be.

College Production

2019 stats – GP: 12, Tackles: 35, Sacks: 6, FF: 0, FR: 2
Overall stats – GP: 29, Tackles: 82, Sacks: 10, FF: 3, FR: 4

Best Landing Spot

Kinlaw can very well hear his name called on the Thursday of the draft. He could go as high as Atlanta as a mid first-round pick, depending on how the draft shakes out, but will most likely hear his name called later that round. Kinlaw could fall to a playoff team like the Chiefs or Vikings as depth and age begin to have an impact on their defenses. Jacksonville could take him at 20 as the Jaguars defense completely fell off in 2019.

Worst Landing Spot

Kinlaw will most likely hear his name called by the second round at the latest. Unless he has a bad combine, and his numbers aren’t what people expected, then he could fall into the third-round, but that’s very hard to imagine. Overall, I don’t think there is a bad landing spot for Kinlaw in this draft. Any team would love to have him as an interior defensive lineman as immediate impact, or add depth. For Kinlaw’s sake, going to a team that has depth wouldn’t be best for him in terms of playing time. Also, he could slip in the later part of the second-round, which would cost him money.

Draft Range

Mid/late 1st-2nd round

NFL Comparison

•   Leonard Williams
•   Arik Armstead

Ratings Breakdown

IQ: 6
Athleticism: 8
Run Defense: 8
Pass Rush: 9
Tackling: 9
Strength: 9


By: Nick Wojcik @DePaulWoj