2022 Wide Receiver (WR) Red Zone Receptions

Nearly 45% of red zone catches end in touchdowns, and the efficiency factor is what we are looking for inside the 20 yard line. While volume is something we are always seeking, efficiency numbers are crucial as well. At the moment, Cole Beasley has four red zone receptions, all of them for touchdowns. Alshon Jeffery has been limited in the red zone, but has made the most of his role with three touchdowns out of four receptions. Green Bay has been one of the best examples of red zone efficiency with Jordy Nelson and Davante Adams leading the way. Their volume was already at a high rate, but the efficiency is what made an Aaron Rodgers led team very dangerous. After diving into the volume part of the charts, seeing the guys who capitalize on it is the next step in the process. We help guide you in that direction.

Nearly 45% of red zone catches end in touchdowns, and the efficiency factor is what we are looking for inside the 20 yard line. While volume is something we are always seeking, efficiency numbers are crucial as well. At the moment, Cole Beasley has four red zone receptions, all of them for touchdowns. Alshon Jeffery has been limited in the red zone, but has made the most of his role with three touchdowns out of four receptions. Green Bay has been one of the best examples of red zone efficiency with Jordy Nelson and Davante Adams leading the way. Their volume was already at a high rate, but the efficiency is what made an Aaron Rodgers led team very dangerous. After diving into the volume part of the charts, seeing the guys who capitalize on it is the next step in the process. We help guide you in that direction.

NAME TEAM DEPTH Wk1 Wk2 Total Avg TD
Cooper Kupp LAR 1 1 3 4 2 3
Garrett Wilson NYJ 1 3 3 1.5 2
Stefon Diggs BUF 1 3 3 1.5 2
Amon-Ra St. Brown DET 1 1 2 3 1.5 3
Christian Kirk JAX 1 1 2 3 1.5 2
Drake London ATL 1 2 2 1 1
Josh Reynolds DET 3 2 2 1 1
Jaylen Waddle MIA 2 2 2 1 2
Tee Higgins CIN 2 2 2 1 1
Amari Cooper CLE 1 1 1 0.5 1
Allen Lazard GB 1 1 1 1 1
Allen Robinson II LAR 2 1 1 0.5 1
Brandon Aiyuk SF 2 1 1 0.5 0
Bryan Edwards ATL 3 1 1 0.5 0
Chris Olave NO 3 1 1 0.5 0
Curtis Samuel WAS 2 1 1 2 1 2
Courtland Sutton DEN 1 1 1 0.5 0
Christian Watson GB 3 1 1 0.5 0
Davante Adams LV 1 1 1 2 1 2
Dax Milne WAS 5 1 1 0.5 0
DJ Moore CAR 1 1 1 0.5 1
Demarcus Robinson BAL 3 1 1 2 1 1
David Sills V NYG 6 1 1 0.5 0
Greg Dortch ARI 4 1 1 0.5 1
Hunter Renfrow LV 2 1 1 0.5 0
Jahan Dotson WAS 3 1 1 2 1 2
Joshua Palmer LAC 2 1 1 0.5 1
JuJu Smith-Schuster KC 1 1 1 2 1 0
Kadarius Toney NYG 4 1 1 0.5 0
Michael Thomas NO 1 2 1 3 1.5 3
Mike Williams LAC 1 1 1 0.5 1
Nelson Agholor NE 2 1 1 0.5 0
Noah Brown DAL 2 1 1 0.5 1
Nico Collins HOU 2 1 1 0.5 0
Nick Westbrook-Ikhine TEN 4 1 1 0.5 0
Olamide Zaccheaus ATL 2 1 1 0.5 1
River Cracraft MIA 6 1 1 0.5 1
Terry McLaurin WAS 1 1 1 0.5 0
Trent Sherfield MIA 4 1 1 0.5 0
Andre Baccellia ARI 0 0 0
A.J. Brown PHI 1 0 0 0
Ashton Dulin IND 2 1 1 0.5 0
A.J. Green ARI 2 0 0 0
Andy Isabella ARI 5 0 0 0
Alec Pierce IND 7 0 0 0
Andre Roberts CAR 7 0 0 0
Amari Rodgers GB 6 0 0 0
Anthony Schwartz CLE 4 0 0 0
Adam Thielen MIN 2 1 1 0.5 0
Braxton Berrios NYJ 4 0 0 0

Nearly 45% of red zone catches end in touchdowns, and the efficiency factor is what we are looking for inside the 20 yard line. While volume is something we are always seeking, efficiency numbers are crucial as well. At the moment, Cole Beasley has four red zone receptions, all of them for touchdowns. Alshon Jeffery has been limited in the red zone, but has made the most of his role with three touchdowns out of four receptions. Green Bay has been one of the best examples of red zone efficiency with Jordy Nelson and Davante Adams leading the way. Their volume was already at a high rate, but the efficiency is what made an Aaron Rodgers led team very dangerous. After diving into the volume part of the charts, seeing the guys who capitalize on it is the next step in the process. We help guide you in that direction.