Tight End Fantasy Football Stats: 2020 Cheat Sheet

Tight ends have become a bigger part of NFL offenses over the last decade or so. We have seen some truly great fantasy tight ends like Rob Gronkowski and Antonio Gates. Touchdowns have always carried tight ends, but with upgraded scoring formats, they are a very relevant fantasy position these days because of their ability to rack up receptions and yards. While the position is not deep, you can certainly find strong names to give you some fantasy production. The tight end fantasy stats page will help you narrow down those tight ends who are seeing big volume. A lot of tight ends will find their way into large red zone targets, which correlate with fantasy points. Be sure to have the correct scoring selected that you are looking for because tight ends will have their value change based on scoring formats.

Tight ends have become a bigger part of NFL offenses over the last decade or so. We have seen some truly great fantasy tight ends like Rob Gronkowski and Antonio Gates. Touchdowns have always carried tight ends, but with upgraded scoring formats, they are a very relevant fantasy position these days because of their ability to rack up receptions and yards. While the position is not deep, you can certainly find strong names to give you some fantasy production. The tight end fantasy stats page will help you narrow down those tight ends who are seeing big volume. A lot of tight ends will find their way into large red zone targets, which correlate with fantasy points. Be sure to have the correct scoring selected that you are looking for because tight ends will have their value change based on scoring formats.

PlayerFantasy PointsReceivingRushing
NAME RTG TEAM DEP BYE GP FPPG SNAP TOUCH TGT TGTS REC REC YDS REC TD YDS/REC CATCH % ATT YDS TD YDS/ATT
Player Travis Kelce
96
KC 1 10 15 Fantasy Points 17.3 3.3 0.4 0.6 Receiving 9.7 7 94.4 0.7 13.5 71.9% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Darren Waller
93
LV 1 6 16 Fantasy Points 14.1 4.3 0.5 0.6 Receiving 9.1 6.7 74.8 0.6 11.2 73.8% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player George Kittle
99
SF 1 11 8 Fantasy Points 12.6 4.4 0.5 0.6 Receiving 7.9 6 79.2 0.2 13.2 76.2% Rushing 0.2 2.1 0 8.5
Player Mark Andrews
86
BAL 1 8 13 Fantasy Points 10.1 4 0.4 0.6 Receiving 6.1 3.9 49.2 0.5 12.5 64.6% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player CJ Uzomah
78
CIN 1 9 2 Fantasy Points 9.3 5.1 0.4 0.6 Receiving 5.5 4 43.5 0.5 10.9 72.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Mike Gesicki
84
MIA 2 11 15 Fantasy Points 8.9 4.6 0.4 0.6 Receiving 5.7 3.5 46.9 0.4 13.3 62.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player T.J. Hockenson
81
DET 1 5 16 Fantasy Points 8.9 5.3 0.5 0.7 Receiving 6.3 4.2 45.2 0.4 10.8 66.3% Rushing 0.1 0 0 0
Player Robert Tonyan Jr.
79
GB 1 5 10 Fantasy Points 8.8 4.6 0.3 0.4 Receiving 3.5 3 37.5 0.6 12.5 85.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Logan Thomas
80
WAS 1 8 16 Fantasy Points 8.7 7.1 0.5 0.8 Receiving 6.9 4.5 41.9 0.4 9.3 65.5% Rushing 0.2 0.3 0 1.7
Player Dallas Goedert
85
PHI 2 9 11 Fantasy Points 8.5 6.2 0.5 0.7 Receiving 5.9 4.2 47.6 0.3 11.4 70.8% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Hunter Henry
85
LAC 1 10 14 Fantasy Points 8.2 7.9 0.5 0.8 Receiving 6.6 4.3 43.8 0.3 10.2 64.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player OJ Howard
84
TB 2 13 4 Fantasy Points 8 4.1 0.3 0.6 Receiving 4.8 2.8 36.5 0.5 13.3 57.9% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Noah Fant
85
DEN 1 8 15 Fantasy Points 7.9 6.1 0.5 0.8 Receiving 6.2 4.1 44.9 0.2 10.9 66.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Rob Gronkowski
87
TB 1 13 16 Fantasy Points 7.9 6.3 0.4 0.6 Receiving 4.8 2.8 38.9 0.4 13.8 58.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Eric Ebron
85
PIT 1 8 15 Fantasy Points 7.6 6.5 0.5 0.8 Receiving 6.1 3.7 37.2 0.3 10 61.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Hayden Hurst
77
ATL 1 10 16 Fantasy Points 7.6 6.3 0.5 0.7 Receiving 5.4 3.5 35.7 0.4 10.2 64.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jimmy Graham
78
CHI 2 11 16 Fantasy Points 7.4 5.3 0.4 0.6 Receiving 4.8 3.1 28.5 0.5 9.1 65.8% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jared Cook
89
NO 1 6 15 Fantasy Points 7.3 4.1 0.3 0.6 Receiving 4 2.5 33.6 0.5 13.6 61.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jonnu Smith
82
TEN 1 7 14 Fantasy Points 7.2 6.6 0.4 0.6 Receiving 4.1 2.6 29.1 0.4 11.3 62.1% Rushing 0.1 0.3 0.1 2
Player Dalton Schultz
73
DAL 1 10 16 Fantasy Points 7.2 8.2 0.5 0.8 Receiving 5.6 3.9 38.4 0.2 9.8 70.8% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Tyler Higbee
82
LAR 1 9 15 Fantasy Points 7.1 7.6 0.4 0.6 Receiving 4 2.9 34.7 0.3 11.8 73.3% Rushing 0.1 0.1 0 1
Player Austin Hooper
87
CLE 1 9 13 Fantasy Points 7 7.3 0.5 0.8 Receiving 5.4 3.5 33.5 0.3 9.5 65.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Evan Engram
83
NYG 1 11 16 Fantasy Points 6.8 7.6 0.6 1 Receiving 6.8 3.9 40.9 0.1 10.4 57.8% Rushing 0.4 1.6 0.1 4.3
Player Irv Smith Jr.
77
MIN 1 7 10 Fantasy Points 6 6.7 0.3 0.5 Receiving 3.2 2.1 23.5 0.4 11.2 65.6% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jordan Reed
81
SF 1 11 10 Fantasy Points 6 4 0.4 0.8 Receiving 4.6 2.6 23.1 0.4 8.9 56.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Albert Okwuegbunam
69
DEN 2 8 4 Fantasy Points 5.9 3.6 0.5 0.6 Receiving 3.8 2.8 30.2 0.2 11 73.3% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Zach Ertz
81
PHI 1 9 11 Fantasy Points 5.4 10.5 0.6 1.2 Receiving 6.5 3.3 30.5 0.1 9.3 50% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Dawson Knox
75
BUF 1 11 10 Fantasy Points 5.3 8.1 0.4 0.8 Receiving 4 2.3 27.3 0.3 11.9 57.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Richard Rodgers
71
PHI 3 9 11 Fantasy Points 5.3 4.1 0.4 0.5 Receiving 2.8 2.2 31.4 0.2 14.4 77.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Trey Burton
77
IND 2 7 13 Fantasy Points 5.3 5.3 0.4 0.7 Receiving 3.6 2.2 19.2 0.2 8.9 59.6% Rushing 0.2 0.2 0.2 1.5
Player Dan Arnold
67
ARI 1 8 16 Fantasy Points 5.1 5.7 0.4 0.6 Receiving 2.8 1.9 27.4 0.2 14.1 68.9% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jordan Akins
77
HOU 3 8 13 Fantasy Points 5 6 0.6 0.8 Receiving 3.8 2.8 31 0.1 10.9 75.5% Rushing 0.1 0.3 0 4
Player Gerald Everett
75
LAR 2 9 15 Fantasy Points 4.8 8.3 0.6 0.8 Receiving 4.1 2.7 27.8 0.1 10.2 67.2% Rushing 0.1 0.1 0.1 2
Player Kyle Rudolph
80
MIN 1 7 12 Fantasy Points 4.3 10.7 0.5 0.7 Receiving 3.1 2.3 27.8 0.1 11.9 75.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Tyler Eifert
77
JAX 2 7 15 Fantasy Points 4.3 8.3 0.6 0.9 Receiving 4 2.4 23.3 0.1 9.7 60% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Mo Alie-Cox
67
IND 1 7 15 Fantasy Points 4.3 7.4 0.5 0.6 Receiving 2.5 2.1 26.3 0.1 12.7 81.6% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Anthony Firkser
70
TEN 3 7 15 Fantasy Points 4.1 5.2 0.6 0.8 Receiving 3.2 2.4 24.5 0.1 10.2 75% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Darren Fells
73
HOU 1 8 16 Fantasy Points 4.1 8 0.3 0.4 Receiving 1.8 1.3 19.5 0.2 14.9 72.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Tyler Kroft
76
BUF 2 11 9 Fantasy Points 4 7.3 0.3 0.4 Receiving 1.8 1.3 13.2 0.3 9.9 75% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Greg Olsen
77
SEA 1 6 11 Fantasy Points 3.8 10.2 0.6 0.9 Receiving 3.4 2.2 21.7 0.1 10 64.9% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Jack Doyle
79
IND 1 7 14 Fantasy Points 3.8 9.8 0.4 0.6 Receiving 2.4 1.6 17.9 0.2 10.9 69.7% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Nick Boyle
83
BAL 2 8 8 Fantasy Points 3.7 11.7 0.4 0.5 Receiving 2 1.6 13.6 0.2 8.4 81.2% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Drew Sample
70
CIN 1 9 16 Fantasy Points 3.7 14.4 0.7 0.9 Receiving 3.3 2.5 21.8 0.1 8.7 75.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player David Njoku
81
CLE 1 9 12 Fantasy Points 3.6 8.7 0.4 0.7 Receiving 2.4 1.6 17.8 0.2 11.2 65.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Harrison Bryant
67
CLE 2 9 14 Fantasy Points 3.6 10.7 0.5 0.8 Receiving 2.7 1.7 17 0.2 9.9 63.2% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Cameron Brate
76
TB 1 13 15 Fantasy Points 3.6 5.5 0.5 0.6 Receiving 2.3 1.9 18.8 0.1 10.1 82.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Donald Parham
67
LAC 3 10 7 Fantasy Points 3.3 4.6 0.2 0.4 Receiving 1.3 0.6 12.6 0.3 22 44.4% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Will Dissly
77
SEA 1 6 15 Fantasy Points 3.3 10.1 0.5 0.6 Receiving 1.9 1.6 16.7 0.1 10.5 82.8% Rushing 0 0 0 0
Player Cole Kmet
73
CHI 1 11 15 Fantasy Points 3.3 11.1 0.6 0.9 Receiving 2.9 1.9 16.2 0.1 8.7 63.6% Rushing 0.1 -0.2 0 -3
Player Jacob Hollister
73
SEA 2 6 16 Fantasy Points 3.3 6.9 0.5 0.7 Receiving 2.5 1.6 13.1 0.2 8.4 62.5% Rushing 0 0 0 0

Tight End Fantasy Stats Cheat Sheet

Whether you are looking at this page during the middle of the season or leading up to the new year, this page will help point you in the right direction for all your tight end needs. Looking from the left, this is where you will find basic player information like their depth chart position, team bye week, and our own Lineups Player Rating. The ratings are ever-changing to pinpoint who are the most valuable tight ends over the last year. Under the fantasy points area, you will see how often a tight end is scoring per game, as well as their overall fantasy points. These are updated each week, as are all of the stats. Fantasy points can also be divided by touch, snap, or target. These help you gauge their fantasy potential based on the number of snaps, touches, or targets they are seeing.

The production stats will give you what you need for how they are producing those fantasy points. Some tight ends are going to make their living on touchdowns or receptions. Then the elite ones will produce on all levels. targets will showcase the volume a tight end is getting, as well as what they are doing with those targets. Catch percentage will show how efficient they are in catching targets thrown their way. When you go into the snaps, targets, and touches, this shows you the overall numbers they are on the field, touching the ball, and seeing pass attempts thrown their way. It will also break down to how they compare to the other players on their team. Red zone stats will break down their production inside the opposing team’s 20, as well as how many targets they are seeing.

What Makes A Good Fantasy Tight End

Volume is usually the first thing that stands out with a good fantasy tight end. We usually think wide receivers can get most of the targets, but there are a lot of stand out tight ends who see 100+ targets a year. This is important because you can’t score fantasy points without getting passing attempts thrown to you. Finding a tight end that is heavily involved in the offense is the first step you should take when looking at a tight end. Using this page, you can see this under the targets and also the percentage of their team targets.

When looking at numbers, this also ties into how your scoring format sets things up. Receptions are important because they will give you a good weekly floor. Even if they don’t find the end zone most weeks, they can still be productive with receptions and yards. This is what we look for in terms of the top end tight ends. They will not make up those types of numbers without receptions and yards. Now, if you are in a league that doesn’t count receptions, yards and touchdowns become much more important.

Touchdowns overall are a high variant stat, because tight ends can have a ten touchdown season, and then four the next. It is just how it goes. Being able to produce on those lower touchdown seasons is what separates the top options from the rest of the field. Tight ends will usually get run in the red zone because they are a mismatch, but finding those tight ends who get more targets than others inside the team’s opposing 20s is important. Keep an eye on how those tight ends are used in the offense because those opportunities that come often will translate into fantasy points.

Red Zone Tight End Stats

Because tight ends are often bigger-bodied and quicker options than defenders, it makes it easy for them to get open against linebackers and get over cornerbacks who don’t have that size or strength. This is why they are often targeted in the red zone. The red zone numbers showcase the fantasy production they have within. You can see which tight ends are generating the most fantasy points in the red zone, but also how crucial the red zone is to their overall fantasy success. Breaking down stats inside the 20 are important because getting targets inside the five-yard line is a lot different from back at the 19-yard line.

When looking at the team, it is important to see how they rank within their own set of players for what they do in the red zone. The target share percentage is going to break down how much of the targets are going where. Running backs and wide receivers will be included as well. The catch percentage shows how efficient receivers are with the targets they are getting in the red zone. targets won’t mean much if they are catching only 50% of them. Like any of the other skill positions, red zone stats are an important part of fantasy football.

Different Styles Of Fantasy Tight Ends

It is extremely important to know what you are getting from the tight end position because the range of outcomes for tight ends is fairly large. The least optimal fantasy tight end is going to be a blocking tight end. They are on the field quite a bit, but the targets and fantasy production are low. These tight ends can be paired with a more receiving tight end threat, and snaps might vary between the two. This is why it is important to check targets and touches because snaps might not tell the whole story. These blocking tight ends are often used on more run-heavy offenses, and teams that are not prioritizing the importance of having a receiving tight end.

There are a few different styles of fantasy tight ends that are more receiving threats. Tight ends that are not the most agile or profound route-runners make their fantasy value in the red zone. They have the advantage over small corners and linebackers, and that gives their team an edge when it comes to the red zone. This is where they can bring fantasy worth, so red zone targets can point this out. Some tight ends are just simply larger wide receivers. Those elite athletes create a size and size mismatch, and they can dominate against anyone. They will often be used in the offense, and targets find their way to them.

Fantasy Gaps Between Tight End Tiers

Unlike some of the other positions in the league, tight ends have wide caps in fantasy production between players in different tiers. The first bunch of tight ends are going within the first few rounds of fantasy drafts, or are the highest auction values. However, the value they have overall is a lot higher than the tight ends going lower on the list. There are only going to be a few 200+ fantasy point scorers at the position each year, and then things will take a steep drop off. Now there are always going to be a late or mid-round guy that overperforms or begins to get going, but in terms of consistency, the top draft picks of the positions are going to be reliable.

The next group of tight ends have a little bit more volatility, but the upside is still there. We haven’t hit the big drop off yet, but the next tier of tight ends doesn’t have the same floor like the ones above. There is a lot of fluctuation in this range, with names popping in and out of these fantasy spots. This can partially be because seasons before were an outlier, and outliers are occurring in this season as well. Tight ends that are on the younger side usually take a few years to get involved in fantasy relevance. Every year we see a few Tight Ends start to get going on teams, and recently it has been names like Hunter Henry and Mark Andrews. There will be more in the future too.

After that we start to get into a pretty big drop off. A lot of this range is made up of younger tight ends who haven’t cracked a full dose of targets yet. Tight ends that are on the older side are starting to fade away, and don’t have the same fantasy impact as before. The upside is severely capped, and the week to week consistency is not ideal. These guys are also not highly involved in the offense but are involved just enough to find their way onto fantasy rosters and be drafted in the later rounds.

Going deeper into the tiers, we start to look at tight ends that are more blocking oriented, and tight ends that are second on the depth chart. This is not a great range, and we get to it a lot quicker in comparison to other positions. That is why finding those top-end tight ends in drafts is fairly important because the gap difference is so much larger. These tight ends do not often find their way into the top half of scoring towards the end of the season. They are deep league options, bench plays, or possibly a streaming option in the right spot. This is certainly a reason why you do not have two or more tight ends on your roster and why those formats are not requiring two tight ends.

Tight End fantasy football stats FAQ

What Stats Score The Most Fantasy Points For Tight Ends?

Receiving tight ends equal six points, and tight ends can accumulate fantasy points quicker than racking up sixty receiving yards. However, if you are in a PPR league, tight ends can generate a lot of fantasy points through receptions that way.

What Are The Most Important Fantasy Stats For Tight Ends?

Touchdowns are a bit more important because not all tight ends will be racking up fantasy points with receptions and yards. Overall they can hit their weekly value by finding the end zone. Volume stats like targets are important as well.

How Are Tight Ends Fantasy Points Calculated?

In most default scoring systems, every ten receiving yards is going to equal one fantasy point. If you are playing PPR leagues, one reception will be one fantasy point. Other scoring systems could be half a point or zero points. Touchdowns equal six points.

What Is Fantasy Points Per Target?

Tight ends will see targets, which are passing attempts thrown their way. Fantasy points per target divides fantasy points by target. This shows the amount of fantasy points they average per target, and provides who is doing the most with their pass attempts

What Are Red Zone Fantasy Points?

Red zone fantasy points are solely the number of fantasy points a player scores while in the opponent’s 20-yard line. If Travis Kelce catches a touchdown while the snap occurred on the 15-yard line, it will go down as red zone fantasy points.

Are Red Zone Stats Important For Tight Ends?

Because tight ends accumulate a lot of their touchdowns within the red zone, they are important for tight ends. Fantasy owners should be looking for tight ends who see targets within the red zone and who are scoring red zone fantasy points.