2019-2020 Wide Receiver (WR) Targets

Targets are extremely important for wide receiver production. Whether that production is for fantasy football or real-life stats, they need targets to have the chance to produce. Within the wide receiver tab, you can see targets are broken out by the week, which can be shown as a percentage of team targets or merely the number of receiving targets. Sort through each week to recap targets and compare them with other wide receivers. You can also check out total numbers and see their overall team target percentage and how often they are making receptions of these targets. This is the spot to find those trends and see who will step up if there is an injury or change on the roster.

Targets are extremely important for wide receiver production. Whether that production is for fantasy football or real-life stats, they need targets to have the chance to produce. Within the wide receiver tab, you can see targets are broken out by the week, which can be shown as a percentage of team targets or merely the number of receiving targets. Sort through each week to recap targets and compare them with other wide receivers. You can also check out total numbers and see their overall team target percentage and how often they are making receptions of these targets. This is the spot to find those trends and see who will step up if there is an injury or change on the roster.

NAME RTG TEAM DEPTH Wk 1 Wk 2 Wk 3 Wk 4 Wk 5 Wk 6 Wk 7 Wk 8 Wk 9 Wk 10 Wk 11 Wk 12 Wk 13 Wk 14 Wk 15 Wk 16 Wk 17 Total Avg TM TGT % Rec Catch % TD
AJ Green
87
CIN 1 9 13 9 9 9.3 5 55.6% 0
Tyler Boyd
80
CIN 2 5 8 5 5 5.2 4 80% 0
Odell Beckham Jr
88
CLE 1 10 6 10 10 16.1 3 30% 0
Mike Thomas
67
CIN 7 3 4 3 3 3.1 2 66.7% 0
Jarvis Landry
82
CLE 2 6 3 6 6 9.7 5 83.3% 0
John Ross
77
CIN 3 5 2 5 5 5.2 2 40% 0
Khadarel Hodge
67
CLE 5 3 2 3 3 4.8 1 33.3% 0
Adam Humphries
79
TEN 3 7 7 7 16.3 6 85.7% 0
Adam Thielen
92
MIN 1 8 8 8 32 6 75% 2
Ashton Dulin
67
IND 6 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Alex Erickson
70
CIN 6 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Andy Isabella
70
ARI 4 0 0 0 0 0% 0
A.J. Brown
83
TEN 1 8 8 8 18.6 5 62.5% 0
Allen Lazard
73
GB 2 4 4 4 9.1 4 100% 1
Allen Robinson
91
CHI 1 9 9 9 25 5 55.6% 0
Amari Cooper
94
DAL 1 14 14 14 35.9 10 71.4% 0
Anthony Miller
79
CHI 2 6 6 6 16.7 4 66.7% 1
Andre Roberts
73
BUF 9 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Auden Tate
76
CIN 5 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Braxton Berrios
68
NYJ 6 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Bennie Fowler
69
NO 3 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Brandon Powell
67
ATL 6 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Byron Pringle
70
KC 5 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Brandin Cooks
88
HOU 2 5 5 5 15.6 2 40% 0
Breshad Perriman
73
NYJ 2 5 5 5 14.3 3 60% 0
Bryan Edwards
71
LV 3 2 1 1 3.3 1 100% 0
Brandon Zylstra
67
CAR 7 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Calvin Ridley
84
ATL 2 12 12 12 22.2 9 75% 2
Christian Blake
67
ATL 4 0 0 0 0 0% 0
CeeDee Lamb
76
DAL 3 12 6 6 15.4 5 83.3% 0
Chase Claypool
67
PIT 4 2 2 2 6.2 2 100% 0
Chris Conley
76
JAX 4 1 1 1 5 1 100% 0
Chris Godwin
86
TB 1 7 7 7 19.4 6 85.7% 0
Chris Hogan
74
NYJ 4 4 4 4 11.4 1 25% 0
Christian Kirk
81
ARI 2 5 5 5 12.5 1 20% 0
CJ Board
68
NYG 7 2 2 2 4.9 2 100% 0
Cole Beasley
80
BUF 3 7 7 7 15.2 4 57.1% 0
Collin Johnson
67
JAX 7 2 1 1 5 1 100% 0
Cooper Kupp
86
LAR 2 5 5 5 16.1 4 80% 0
Cordarrelle Patterson
77
CHI 4 1 1 1 2.8 1 100% 0
Corey Davis
78
TEN 2 8 8 8 18.6 7 87.5% 0
Cam Sims
68
WAS 5 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Curtis Samuel
78
CAR 3 8 8 8 23.5 5 62.5% 0
Cedrick Wilson
71
DAL 5 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Daesean Hamilton
68
DEN 4 3 3 3 9.1 1 33.3% 0
Damiere Byrd
73
NE 4 0 0 0 0 0% 0
Danny Amendola
79
DET 3 7 7 7 16.7 5 71.4% 0
Darius Slayton
81
NYG 1 9 9 9 22 6 66.7% 2
Darnell Mooney
67
CHI 7 6 3 3 8.3 3 100% 0
Davante Adams
97
GB 1 17 17 17 38.6 14 82.4% 2

Targets are extremely important for wide receiver production. Whether that production is for fantasy football or real-life stats, they need targets to have the chance to produce. Within the wide receiver tab, you can see targets are broken out by the week, which can be shown as a percentage of team targets or merely the number of receiving targets. Sort through each week to recap targets and compare them with other wide receivers. You can also check out total numbers and see their overall team target percentage and how often they are making receptions of these targets. This is the spot to find those trends and see who will step up if there is an injury or change on the roster.

Viewing Wide Receiver Targets

Every week targets will update to show the prior week's data and help you view targets for wide receivers. Throughout a season, you will be able to spot trends and see who gets targets consistently. You can also use prior seasons to determine if targets are safe for a wide receiver early in the year. The dropdowns up top can help you navigate based on year or position. You can also select to view teams, and this is helpful to narrow down targets within a singular team, especially over a few weeks. There are two main ways to see targets, and that is simply just with totals, or you can look at the percentage. If a player gets 30% of the team targets in a week, that number will be reasonably high.

Within the table, you can see the rating we have for the player, which is our unique rating based off of stats that will update each week. You can also see their depth chart, which will always update if there are any moves. Next is the table divided into weeks, where you can see how they got to their total targets. A receiver jumping from three targets to nine the next might have a story behind it. If receivers don't have targets, that is because they did not record any for some reason. That is usually injury-related, or they simply didn't see the field.

The total numbers at the end are going to be accumulated over the season. You can see how many targets a receiver averages per game and also the percentage of targets within a team's offense. We will also want to know if they are making the most of their targets or not, with receptions, catch percentage, and touchdowns. One thing we are going to note is that this table can be used to help see where targets go with injuries. If a player that sees 25% of the targets is out for the next few weeks, those targets will be spread out to other players. This chart can help showcase that.

Projecting Targets For Fantasy Football

Because of the correlation of targets and fantasy points, we often will be looking for receivers who will be getting a hefty amount of targets. Some wide receivers are more straightforward to project than others, like your team's WR1. They are usually going to see eight or more targets every week, and you can bank on that consistency. However, it is not always that simple. Matchups might cause a change of plans in an opposing offense where they work the ball more towards their running backs or tight ends. They can also avoid throwing to a shutdown corner and look more at secondary options. Games, where an offense is expected to be trailing, might see a tick up in passing attempts, which would mean more targets to go around. The same can be said if they are expected to blowout a team where the running backs get more work instead. These are some of the outside factors to consider when looking at projecting targets.

When injuries or even roster changes occur, there will be changes in team targets. If a WR1 goes out, that could leave 8-9 targets up for grabs. Now, if a minor player goes down, then it isn't as dramatic when looking at the potential target uptick for other names. Teams will go about this in a few ways; they might spread out the ball across the board or give the next in line a tick up in targets. For example, we saw the Packers last year spread around their targets when Davante Adams missed a few games. They also ran the ball a bit more, which is another option that offenses have and can deploy.

What Wide Receivers Get The Most Targets?

There are a few consistencies that wide receivers have at the top of the target table. The depth chart is always going to be essential, and you will notice that the names at the top of the table will be number one on their team's depth chart. Being a number one wideout is always crucial because those are the ones who usually produce the best stats and draw the most targets. This would be your Julio Jones-style receivers and names like Michael Thomas and Davante Adams. You might see a few number two wide receivers up at the top of the list when sorting through targets. This is because they are on a team without any other options at running back or tight end to throw too, or they have a team with a heavy passing offense. Volume is always going to be something to factor in, and WR2s in potent passing offenses have the edge over WR2s on other teams.

We will take the Kansas City Chiefs as an example, where they have different styles of wide receivers on their team. They also have a top tight end in Travis Kelce and use their running backs in the passing game. However, Tyreek Hill is their WR1 and sees the most targets out of their receiving core. Now he isn't like some other WR1s where they are more physical threats. He still operates as one and sees big targets in addition to Kelce. Sammy Watkins would fall in line next as the WR2, where he sees the third-most targets on the team. Then you have names like Demarcus Robinson and Mecole Hardman, who are speed threats and only average a few targets a game.

Receivers With The Highest Team Target Shares

If you are looking for a rundown of the league's top wide receivers that lead in targets, you have come to the right place. Michael Thomas has been a target machine for the New Orleans Saints since coming into the league, and he has also been one of the more talented wide receivers. He has had a catch rate of over 75% over the past four seasons. Having Drew Brees also helps. Davante Adams has soaked up most of the team targets for the Green Bay Packers over the last few seasons. Partly because there is no help, but also because he is the most talented wideout on the team. DeAndre Hopkins is another name that dominates in targets. He has played in Houston for his career, but traded to Arizona; he will still operate as a WR1.

Julio Jones continues to dominate, even over the age of 30. He has always led the Falcons in targets, and that continues to be the case for him. Often an overlooked name is Allen Robinson, who has had no help with quarterback play as Mitch Trubisky and Blake Bortles have been his quarterback over his career. However, Robinson is someone who leads the teams he plays for in targets like a true WR1. Keenan Allen is another name for the Los Angeles Chargers, who have continuously seen high targets as the team's WR1. Even with talented names around him, Allen has been consistently used. Julian Edelman has been used in a similar way for the New England Patriots, as he has been someone who has racked up plenty of targets. Despite the trade for Odell Beckham Jr, Jarvis Landry has seen a bulk of Cleveland's targets. Both of them have some of the higher target rates in the NFL, and that has been the case even when they were with New York and Miami.

The Los Angeles Rams have had one of the more potent passing attacks over the last few seasons, and Robert Woods has been consistently at the top of the list for targets. Cooper Kupp is another name and heading into the new year, and there will be no Brandin Cooks. Younger names are beginning to make their mark. Courtland Sutton is a name on the rise and is the WR1 in Denver. He is coming off a season where he was at 25% of the team targets. Amari Cooper isn't quite the newcomer he once was, and a change of teams has not derailed his targets one bit. In fact, both he and his teammate Michael Gallup were two of the highest-targeted wideouts in football last season. The receiving core from the previous draft produced big numbers. Terry McLaurin went to Washington and instantly saw the most targets as there was a lack of options. D.K. Metcalf saw a massive amount of targets in Seattle, even with Tyler Lockett and the Seahawks opting to be a run-first offense. A.J. Brown is another name for the Titans, who saw over 80 targets.

FAQ

What Are Targets For Wide Receivers?

Targets for wide receivers are a way of recording how many passing attempts are thrown to them. A target is marked whether the receiver catches it or not. Targets can be divided by any position that has a passing attempt thrown their way.

What Wide Receiver Had The Most Targets In 2019?

Michael Thomas of the New Orleans Saints had the most targets in the NFL during the 2019 season. He had 185 total targets, and nobody else had more than 160. Thomas saw 31% of the Saints targets and averaged 11.6 per game.

What Wide Receiver Had The Most Targets In 2018?

Julio Jones of the Atlanta Falcons led all players in targets with 170. That was one more than Davante Adams. Jones averaged 10.6 per game and had 28.3% of the Falcons overall team targets. He produced 113 catches on those targets.

Who Has The Most Targets In A Single Season?

In 1997 for the Arizona Cardinals, Rob Moore had 208 targets. These are the most targets by any player in a single season. Moore caught less than 50% of his targets but had 97 catches for 1,584 receiving yards and eight touchdowns.

What Is Team Target Percentage?

The team target percentage is a way of looking at the rate of overall targets a player is getting for their team. For example, if Julio Jones has a 27% target percentage, he sees 27% of all the passes thrown in Atlanta.

What Is Considered A High Number For Team Target Percentage?

Anything over 20% for team targets is going to be a substantial number for wide receivers. This usually means they are getting 90+ targets, which is what you want when looking at wide receivers for fantasy football.

Do Wide Receivers Get The Most Targets?

Wide receivers are usually the most targeted on a team. On occasion, you might see a tight end lead the team in targets, but WR1 and WR2 type players are going to see a strong amount of targets on their team.